Wed Apr 23 2014   
 

College News

14th Annual Richard Grand Damages Argument Competition Award-Winners Announced Read more...

Posted: 04/21/2014

 

Conversations with Bob Mundheim Continues with John Cannon of Shearman & Sterling Read more...

Posted: 04/07/2014

 

Board of Regents Approves Reduction in Arizona Law Nonresident Tuition Read more...

Posted: 04/04/2014

 

Peter Mundheim & Brandon Becker Join Prof. Mundheim in the Conversation Series Read more...

Posted: 03/31/2014

 

Conversations with Bob Mundheim Start March 24, 2014 Read more...

Posted: 03/24/2014

 

Arizona Law Career Development Starts Interview Program in Phoenix Read more...

Posted: 03/14/2014

 

Arizona Law and Quarles & Brady Partner to Launch Intellectual Property & Entrepreneurship Clinic Read more...

Posted: 03/11/2014

 

UANews Features Prof. Anaya's Work as Teacher & International Human Rights Expert Read more...

Posted: 02/27/2014

 

Richard Grand Legal Writing Competition Rewards Excellence in Legal Writing Read more...

Posted: 02/17/2014

 

Prof Anaya Nominated for Nobel Peace Prize Read more...

Posted: 02/07/2014

 

Environmental Breakfast Club 2013 - 2014 Schedule Read more...

Posted: 09/11/2013

 

 

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Course Description

The course in Civil Procedure introduces the structure and operation of the civil justice system. The term civil as used here distinguishes this field from the field of criminal law. The litigation processes studied involve lawsuits in which the parties seek civil remedies, such as compensatory or punitive damages, injunctive relief, or a declaratory judgment. In criminal litigation, in contrast, the government seeks to impose criminal sanctions on the defendant for unlawful conduct. The course in civil procedure is largely an examination of the ground-rules for litigation between private parties.

The term procedure refers to the rules and doctrines governing the process of litigation rather than the substantive principles underlying the claims and defenses in litigation. The emphasis is on questions lawyers face in litigation, such as how and where to start a lawsuit, how factual investigation takes place, what claims and parties can be combined in a single lawsuit, what mechanisms a court can use to end a lawsuit without trial, and which questions are barred from litigation after a final judgment. While courts prefer to resolve cases on the merits, many lawsuits are won or lost because of procedural issues that have nothing to do with the merits.

 

Updated: 01/06/2014