Ninth Circuit Conference
Fri Sep 19 2014 10:52:32 UA Law | Events | Ninth Circuit Conference | Speakers & Moderators  

Speakers & Moderators

Vik Amar
is the Harry and Lillian Hastings Research Professor of Law at the University of California, Hastings College of Law in San Francisco, where he has taught since 1997 and where he teaches in public law fields, including constitutional law, civil procedure, criminal procedure, and remedies. He received his A.B. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1985 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1988. He served as a law clerk for Judge William A. Norris of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and then for Justice Harry A. Blackmun. He practiced law with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, dividing his time between complex civil litigation and white collar criminal defense. He then taught at the UC-Davis and UCLA law schools. He teaches regularly as a visiting professor at UC-Berkeley’s Boalt Hall School of Law.

W. Scott Bales recently appointed to the Arizona Supreme Court, will take his seat there on September 16, 2005. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1983 and clerked for Ninth Circuit Judge Joseph T. Sneed III and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. Mr. Bales served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Policy Development, as the Special Investigative Counsel for the Justice Department’s Inspector General, and as a federal prosecutor in the United States attorney’s office in Phoenix. Mr. Bales served as Arizona’s Solicitor General from 1999-2001. He has taught as an adjunct professor at the law schools of The University of Arizona and Arizona State University.

Sara C. Benesh has been an assistant professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee since 2001, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in civil rights and civil liberties, judicial behavior, and political methodology. She received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 1999. She taught at the University of New Orleans from 1999-2001.

Joe S. Cecil, who received his J.D. and a Ph.D. in psychology from Northwestern University, is a senior research associate and project director in the Division of Research at the Federal Judicial Center. Currently he directs the Center’s Program on Scientific and Technical Evidence, and serves as the principal editor of the Center’s Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence. He directs an FJC research project on the difficulties that arise with expert testimony in federal courts, with an emphasis on clinical medical testimony and forensic science evidence. He has published several articles on the use of court-appointed experts, has served as a member of several panels of the National Academy of Sciences, and presently serves on its Science, Technology & Law panel.

Cathy Catterson has worked at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit for 20 years, serving as a senior case expeditor, chief deputy clerk, court executive, and clerk of the court. She received her undergraduate degree from the Catholic University of America and her J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. As a staff assistant to Sen. Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.), she served as a research assistant to the Senator’s chief legislative assistant with responsibility for domestic legislation. After law school, as a law clerk to Judge Edward J. Devitt (D.Minn.), she was on the staff for the U.S. Judicial Conference Committee to Consider Standards for Admission to Practice in the Federal Courts and for its subcommittees.

Gloria A. Goldman, who received her undergraduate degree from Wayne State University and her J.D. from
The University of Arizona, has practiced immigration
and nationality law in Tucson, Arizona, since 1991.
Ms. Goldman represents clients in the areas of business immigration, family immigration, and citizenship, as well as political asylum and complicated deportation matters. She represents clients before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Susan B. Haire is an associate professor of political science in the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Georgia. She received her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1993; her dissertation was co-recipient of the American Political Science Association’s Edward C. Corwin Award. Her research has focused on the U.S. Courts of Appeals, with a particular emphasis on the role of resources in judicial decision making.

Michael Daly Hawkins is a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. His service began on September 15, 1994, and he currently maintains his chambers in Phoenix, Arizona. He is a graduate of Arizona State University (B.A. and J.D.) and the University of Virginia (LL.M.). Judge Hawkins served to the rank of captain in the United States Marine Corps (1970-1973), where his duties included service as a special courts martial military judge. He engaged in the private practice of law from 1973 to 1977 and again from 1980 to 1994. While in private practice, he frequently served as a judge pro tempore of the Arizona Court of Appeals. He served as a United States attorney for the District of Arizona from 1977 to 1980.

Arthur D. Hellman is a professor of law and at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and as of 2005, inaugural holder of the Sally Ann Semenko Endowed Chair. He teaches courses in federal courts, civil procedure, and constitutional law. In 2001, he was designated as one of the law school’s first Distinguished Faculty Scholars, and in 2002, received the Chancellor’s Distinguished Research Award. He received his B.A. from Harvard University in 1963 and his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1966. Professor Hellman has studied and written about the Ninth Circuit for more than 30 years. In the 1970’s, he served as Deputy Executive Director of the Commission on Revision of the Federal Court Appellate System (Hruska Commission).

Bruce R. Heurlin is a shareholder with Karp, Heurlin & Weiss in Tucson, Arizona. He practices primarily in complex federal civil litigation and federal white collar criminal defense, and has argued many appeals in the Ninth Circuit and in other circuits. He received his B.S. from Drake University and his J.D. from The University of Arizona. Mr. Heurlin served as a trial attorney in the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, as a special attorney in the District of New Mexico, and as an assistant U.S. attorney in the District of Arizona. Mr. Heurlin has served on the faculty of many trial advocacy programs and is an adjunct assistant professor of law at the James E. Rogers College of Law at The University of Arizona.

Toni M. Massaro is Dean of the James E. Rogers College of Law at The University of Arizona, where she has taught since 1989. Since 1997, she has been the Milton O. Riepe Chair in Constitutional Law. She currently teaches constitutional law and has taught civil procedure, evidence, legal counseling and Constitutional Law in Public School Settings. Dean Massaro received her undergraduate degree from Northwestern University and her law degree from the College of William and Mary in 1980. She was in private practice with Vedder, Price, Kaufman and Kammholz in Chicago. She has also taught at Washington and Lee, Stanford, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, and the University of Florida.

M. Margaret McKeown has been a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit since 1998. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Wyoming in 1972 and from Georgetown University Law Center in 1975. Judge McKeown was a White House Fellow in 1980-1981, serving as a special assistant to the Secretary of the Interior and a special assistant at the White House. In 1992, she served as a Japan Society Leadership Fellow. After law school, Judge McKeown joined Perkins Coie and was a partner in its Seattle and Washington, D.C. offices, with a practice focused on complex litigation, intellectual property, antitrust, and trade regulation.

Mary M. Murguia has been a judge in the United States District Court for the District of Arizona since 2002, and is the first Latina to serve on that court. She received undergraduate degrees in Spanish and journalism from the University of Kansas in 1982 and her J.D. from the University of Kansas Law School in 1985. She began her legal career in 1985 as an assistant district attorney in Wyandotte County, Kansas (Kansas City). In 1990, Judge Murguia was appointed an assistant United States attorney for the District of Arizona. She served as Criminal Deputy Chief from 1994-1998. Starting in August 1998, Judge Murguia served as the counsel to the director of the Executive Office for United States Attorneys at the United States Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. In September 1999, Attorney General Reno appointed her the Director for the Executive Office for United States Attorneys.

John B. Oakley is a professor of law at the University of California at Davis, where he has taught since 1975. He teaches civil procedure, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction, and jurisprudence, and he is also an associate in the Department of Philosophy. He graduated from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969 and from Yale Law School in 1972. He served as a law clerk for a federal district court judge and for the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of California. He has served as a scholar-in-residence and a senior trial attorney at the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and has been a visiting scholar at University College, Oxford, as well as a visiting professor of law at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Tennessee.

Michael Rusing, a graduate of Stanford Law School, is a senior partner in the law firm of Rusing & Lopez in Tucson, Arizona. With over 24 years of experience in all areas of civil litigation, he emphasizes business litigation, both plaintiff and defense injury cases, and, most recently, class actions. Mr. Rusing has been active in matters involving the federal courts.

Pamela Ann Rymer has been a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit since 1989, after serving as a judge in the United States District Court for the Central District of California from 1983-1989. She received her undergraduate degree from Vassar College, her law degree from Stanford, and a Doctor of Laws degree from Pepperdine University. Before taking the bench, she was engaged in the practice of law, and was a partner at Lillick McHose & Charles (1966-1975) and Toy and Rymer (1975-1983).

Mary M. Schroeder has been Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit since December 2000, and has served on that court since 1979. She received her undergraduate degree from Swarthmore College in 1962 and her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School in 1965. After serving as a trial lawyer in the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, Chief Judge Schroeder was a law clerk to Justice Jesse A. Udall of the Arizona Supreme Court. She practiced law with and was a partner at Lewis and Roca in Phoenix, doing substantial work in the fields of appeals, labor law, and construction. From 1975-1979, she was a judge of the Arizona Court of Appeals, receiving the first such appointment under Arizona’s merit system for selecting appellate judges. Chief Judge Schroeder has taught at Arizona State University College of Law and as an adjunct lecturer at Duke University Law School.

Kevin Scott is an assistant professor of political science at Texas Tech University. He received his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 2002. His primary research interests are in the field of judicial politics. His work includes current projects on judges of the U.S. Courts of Appeals and justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, and also includes the relationship between Congress and the federal judiciary
and the impact of the Supreme Court on public opinion.

Roslyn Silver has been a judge in the United States District Court for the District of Arizona since October 14, 1994. She received her B.A. in 1968 from the University of California at Santa Barbara and her J.D. in 1971 from Arizona State University College of Law, where she was the comment editor of the law review. Immediately prior to taking the bench, she was the Criminal Division Chief and First Assistant in the United States Attorney’s Office in Phoenix.

Elliot E. Slotnick is a professor of political science and associate dean of the graduate school at Ohio State University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1976, and has taught at Ohio State since 1977. Professor Slotnick’s main area of interest is in judicial politics, and he has been a student of federal judicial selection processes and their outcomes since the 1970’s.

Rorie Spill Solberg received her Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1997. She taught at Binghamton University and the University of Northern Iowa before following the lead of Lewis and Clark and joining the faculty at Oregon State University, where she teaches introduction to American government, methodology, judicial politics, gender and the law, and constitutional law.

Michael Solimine received his B.A. in political science from Wright State University in 1978 and his J.D. from Northwestern University School of Law in 1981. After he clerked for U.S. District Judge Walter Rice in the Southern District of Ohio, he was a litigation associate at the Dayton, Ohio, office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur. In 1987, he joined the faculty at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, where he is the Donald P. Klekamp Professor of Law. He teaches and writes in the areas of civil procedure, federal jurisdiction, and conflict of laws.

Richard Tallman is a judge on the United States Circuit Court for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, with chambers in Seattle. He was nominated by President Clinton and was confirmed by the Senate in May 2000. Prior to his judicial service, Judge Tallman was an associate, and later a partner, in Schweppe, Krug, Tausend & Beezer from 1983-1989; a member of Bogle & Gates from 1990-1999, where he chaired the White Collar Criminal Defense Practice Group; and, a partner in the Seattle firm of Tallman & Severin from 1999-2000. At all three firms, he handled complex commercial litigation involving business issues collateral to white collar matters such as civil RICO suits, False Claims Act (or qui tam) “whistleblower” lawsuits, shareholder derivative suits, securities fraud, antitrust, income tax, and commercial bribery cases.

Sidney R. Thomas is a judge on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. He was nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate on January 2, 1996. Judge Thomas received his undergraduate education at Montana State University and received his law degree from the University of Montana School of Law in 1978. From 1978-1996, he was engaged in the private practice of law in Billings, Montana, with an emphasis on complex civil commercial litigation. For fifteen years, Judge Thomas has been an adjunct instructor in law at Rocky Mountain College, from which he received an honorary doctorate in law in 1998.

Stephen L. Wasby is a professor emeritus of political science at the University at Albany-SUNY and a visiting scholar at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth. He received his B.A. from Antioch College and his M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Oregon. He was a Russell Sage Post-Doctoral Resident in Law and Social Science as the Director of the Law and Social Sciences Program at the National Science Foundation. Professor Wasby earlier served on the faculty at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and he has been a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; the United States Naval Academy; the University of Toronto, where he was the Bissell-Fulbright Chair in Canadian-American Relations; and the University of Victoria (B.C.), where he was a visiting professor of law.

Henry E. Weinstein received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1966 and his J.D. from Boalt Hall in 1969. Since 1993, he has been a legal affairs writer for the Los Angeles Times, for which he was previously a staff writer and labor writer. His reporting focuses on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He earlier worked as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. As an adjunct professor of law at the University of Southern California Law School, he has co-taught a seminar on law and the media.

Stephen J. Wermiel is Associate Director of the Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project at American University Washington College of Law, where he first directed the Program on Law and Government and then taught courses on media law and constitutional law. As an adjunct professor, he teaches a seminar on the Supreme Court and the First Amendment. He received his B.A. from Tufts in 1972 and his law degree from the Washington College of Law in 1982. He earlier taught as a fellow at William and Mary Law School and then at Georgia State University from 1992-1997. From 1972-1979, Professor Wermiel was a reporter for The Boston Globe. From 1979-1991, he was the Supreme Court correspondent for The Wall Street Journal.

Russell Wheeler, who received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago in 1970, has
served since 1991 as the Deputy Director of the Federal Judicial Center, which he joined in 1977. After teaching political science at Texas Tech University (1970-1973), he was one of the first two U.S. Supreme Court Fellows (1973-1974), and then was a research associate in the Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Chief Justice of the United States (1974-1976) and a senior staff associate at the National Center for State Courts (1976-1977). He is currently an adjunct faculty member at the Washington College of Law, American University. In 2003, he received the Supreme Court Fellows Alumni Association’s first Administration of Justice Award.

   
       
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