Mon Sep 01 2014   
Legal Writing
 

The 2014/15 Student Handbook

Updated Jun. 10, 2014


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Table of Contents

 

Introduction

 

Honor Code

 

Attendance and Class Participation Policy

 

Accommodations for Students With Disabilities

 

Curriculum

   J.D. Program

 

LL.M. and S.J.D. Programs in Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy  Requirements (IPLP)

 

LL.M. and S.J.D. Programs in International Trade and Business Law Requirements

 

 

Examination Procedures and Reporting of Grades

 

Grading System

 

Registration

 

Procedure for Degree Candidacy

 

Leaves of Absence, Probation, & Disqualification

 

Bar Examinations

 

Career & Professional Development

 

Costs and Financial Aid

 

Student Health Policy

 

The Law Library

 

Student Committees/Activities

 

Student Organizations

 

Student-Faculty Committees

 

College of Law Policies

 

Student Complaints

 

Email Policy

 

Rooms

 

Parking

 

Signage

 

University Polices

 

Introduction

The purpose of the Student Handbook is to acquaint you with the rules, policies, procedures and organizations of The James E. Rogers College of Law at The University of Arizona.  YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR REVIEWING AND UNDERSTANDING ALL OF THE MATERIAL IN THIS HANDBOOK.

 

You should not assume that all policies announced in this handbook will remain in effect for the entire time you are a student here.  The University of Arizona and The College of Law reserve the right to change the fees, policies, procedures, rules, regulations, requirements for graduation, course offerings, and any other contents of this handbook at any time. You will be able to review changes here in this handbook.


You are subject to the College of Law's Honor Code.  As well, as are all students, you are subject to the Student Code of Conduct (ABOR 5-308 et seq.) indicated here in this Handbook and other policies adopted by the University.  The Code of Conduct spells out Prohibited Conduct and sanctions for such conduct.  Additionally, student conduct that violates state or federal law has a bearing on the fitness to practice law, and must be reported by the student when applying to take the bar exam.  Further, any criminal conviction in a student's file must be reported by the College of Law when asked to certify the student for bar admission.  Finally, you are under an ongoing duty to report any citations, convictions of any misdemeanors or felonies that occur while you are in law school.  These include citations and convictions that involve the use of drugs or alcohol.


The College of Law takes seriously its responsibility to foster civility and professionalism in its students.  It is expected that students will timely respond to faculty and staff requests for information or meetings to discuss matters of concern.  It is further expected that students will, at all times, deal courteously with fellow students, staff, faculty and administrators.


If you have any questions about the viability of policies or rules announced in this Handbook, speak to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.

 

The College of Law's Honor Code and the rules for taking examinations are also found in this Handbook.  You are responsible for familiarizing yourself with the Honor Code immediately, and with the examination rules before taking examinations.  If you have any questions about the Honor Code, please speak with the Dean, Marc Miller.


We wish you the best of luck in law school and in your legal career.

 

The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law

 

 

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The Honor Code

 

Preamble

The Honor Code is predicated on the assumption that the conduct of students at the College of Law will at all times reflect the standards of integrity expected of entrants to the legal profession.  The speech and conduct of students at the College of Law are governed by the Honor Code and all students are responsible for knowing and abiding by the Honor Code.
Students at the College of Law are also expected and indeed required to comply with the University's Student Code of Conduct, which may be found at here.  This Student Code of Conduct establishes the rules of intellectual honesty, self-discipline and respect for the rights of all individuals necessary in a university community dedicated to the advancement of all persons. 

 

 

Section 1: Statement of Purpose

A. A law school prepares students for entry into the legal profession and educates students in the history, philosophy and practice of law and legal norms. The integrity of one’s words and actions are of utmost importance to this educational endeavor; both as a model for norms that are expected in the profession and which are vital to any academic institution where the free exchange of ideas and the advancement in one’s studies requires trust that one’s ideas or accomplishments will not be stolen or misused by others.  The Honor Code is just one element in establishing such a culture of trust, albeit an important one.  The Honor Code articulates standards and establishes rules to govern student conduct at the University of Arizona College of Law and provides procedures for their administration and the adjudication of any infractions. 

B. The Honor Code particularly governs student conduct with respect to academic integrity. 

C. The Honor Code is also intended to promote an atmosphere of confidence and trust among students.

 

Section 2: The Honor Pledge

Every student at the College of Law pledges not to participate in or tolerate academic dishonesty.

 

 

Section 3: Scope

A. While the Honor Code provides guidance for many aspects of life at the College, the Code governs academic conduct including all assignments, examinations, papers, and projects submitted for academic credit or as part of classes or activities for which academic credit is sought or granted.

B. Jurisdiction over matters not included in, or not explicitly resolved by, the Honor Code, is reserved to the Dean or the Dean's designee.

 

Section 4: Academic Matters and Academic Fraud

A. General Principles

The Honor Code governs in particular academic matters.  For purposes of the Honor Code, “academic matter” means an act or activity by any student that may affect that student’s or any other student’s grade, standing at the College of Law, course enrollment, or progress toward satisfaction of requirements for graduation.  Dishonesty and fraud with respect to work submitted for a degree or credit toward a degree are always academic matters.  Academic matters include, but are not limited to:

  1. any application for admission to the Law College, or supporting documentation relating to such an application;
  2. any examination;
  3. any research, writing, or other assignment for a course or credit toward graduation;
  4. any matter involving participation in classes, clinics, moot courts, internships, externships, Rule 38(d) or similar sponsored placements, or independent study projects, and compliance with class conduct and other participation rules; and
  5. any matter involving placement on or work for the Arizona Law Review, Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law, Arizona Journal of Environmental Law and Policy or any other journal officially supported by the Law College subsequent to the effective date of this Code, including administration of and participation in the "write-on" competitions of those journals.

 

B.  Examinations
1.  Every Law College examination is governed by the Honor Code.

2. The Honor Code applies to all aspects of the examination process at the Law College, including student conduct before, during, and after any examination, and the procedure by which examinations are administered.  Students should in all cases follow the specific instructions for a given examination set forth by the instructor in the examination instructions.

3.  Unless otherwise provided by the course instructor, it is a violation of the Honor Code, in connection with an examination, to:

  • give, receive, or solicit aid relating to the substance of the examination during any examination, or in connection with any make-up examination;
  • use materials during any examination not expressly permitted by the instructor;
  • begin reading any part of the examination prior to the start of the examination or failing to start the exam software when told to do so;
  • continue writing or typing any examination answer when the examination time has expired;
  • retain, without instructor permission, examination questions (hard or electronic copy) beyond the time when examinations have been collected at the conclusion of the examination;
  • work on an examination in any place other than the designated location;
  • discuss the examination with the instructor after the examination and before grades have been submitted;
  • engage in any conduct prior to or during the examination that unreasonably interferes with another student's ability to concentrate or otherwise complete the examination; or
  • engage in any other conduct in the preparation or taking of an examination that gives a student an unfair advantage or places another student at an unfair disadvantage.

4.   It is a violation of the Honor Code to remove materials from the library without authorization, or to fail to return materials including casebooks, with the intent to interfere with the ability of other students to complete assignments or prepare for exams.

5. The prohibitions described above are examples of violations of this Honor Code; conduct not specifically identified may also violate the Honor Code.  In general, any conduct that tends to create an unfair advantage for certain students and a disadvantage for others with respect to an examination may violate the Honor Code.

 

C.  Research Assignments, Writing Projects and Other Class Assignments
1.  All written work submitted for credit or as part of a course of study at the Law College is governed by the Honor Code, and every student is expected to behave with integrity with respect to all written work.

2.  It is a violation of the Honor Code, in connection with any research assignment, writing project, or other class assignment to:
a)  engage in any act or use any materials specifically prohibited by the instructions governing the assignment;
b) submit as one’s own work the work of another;
c)  submit as one's own work any work partially or wholly edited by another person unless specifically permitted to do so by the instructions governing the assignment;
d) submit for course credit work already or simultaneously submitted, in whole or in part, for credit in another course, without the explicit permission of the second instructor, and without providing the second instructor with a copy of the originally submitted material;
e) submit for course credit work already or simultaneously submitted, in whole or in part, for fulfillment of a publication note requirement, or fulfillment of the substantial paper requirement, without the explicit permission of the second instructor, and without providing the second instructor with a copy of the originally submitted material;
f) submit as part of a publication note or substantial paper work already or simultaneously submitted, in whole or in part, for credit in any course, without the explicit permission of a faculty sponsor of the journal receiving the note, or of the faculty sponsor of the substantial paper; or
e) use any material created by others without proper attribution.
3. Plagiarism, which is the failure to properly credit the sources of words or ideas used in one’s written work, constitutes academic fraud and thus violates the Honor Code.  What constitutes proper crediting of sources is left to the discretion of the course instructor, the publication editor supervising a student note, or the faculty sponsor of a substantial paper. Any questions about proper attribution should be raised with those persons.  University of Arizona resources explaining plagiarism and how to avoid it are here.  Guidance to avoid plagiarism in legal writing can be found here and here.

4. In order to avoid plagiarism, proper attribution must be given for ideas and language of others that are included in a student’s written work.  Where attribution is absent, it is assumed that the student intends to represent the words and ideas as his own work, and the student will be responsible to bear the consequences for any resulting misrepresentation.

5. In particular, verbatim repetition in student work of the words of another must, without exception, be indicated, for example by use of quotation marks, along with an appropriate citation to the source of the quotation.

6. Where a student paraphrases the words of another, this must also be indicated, for example through appropriate punctuation, along with an appropriate citation to the source of the language paraphrased.

7.  The failure to obey the prohibitions and requirements described in this subsection are examples of violations of the Honor Code, and are not meant to be an exclusive list of Honor Code violations that may occur

 

Section 5: Duty to Cooperate; False Accusations

A.  Duty to Report Honor Code Violation
All students have the duty to report to the Dean of Academic Affairs any circumstances they believe to constitute or indicate a violation of the Honor Code.  This includes the obligation to report one’s own actions if they violate the Honor Code.  Staff members, exam proctors, or other persons may also report violations of the Honor Code.

B.  Duty to Cooperate with Honor Code Investigations and Adjudications
1. All students have the duty to cooperate with investigations and adjudications of alleged violations of the Honor Code if requested by a student facing disciplinary charges, the Honor Council, or the Dean of Academic Affairs.
2. Failure to cooperate is itself a separate Honor Code violation, subjecting the person not cooperating to sanction.
3. Intentional misrepresentations made with respect to an Honor Code investigation or adjudication are separate Honor Code violations, subjecting the person responsible for the misrepresentation to sanction.

C.  Violation to Make False Accusation
It is a violation of the Honor Code knowingly to report an Honor Code violation that is without merit, or that the reporter knows to be baseless.

 

 

Section 6: The Honor Council

A.  Every academic year there shall be constituted an Honor Council composed of five members.  The term of service on the Honor Council is one academic year.  Unless separately appointed by the Dean, the Executive Committee shall serve as the Honor Council.   Regardless, the Honor Council must include the following members:

  1. Two students selected under procedures prescribed by the Student Bar Association; and
  2. Three faculty members appointed by the Dean of the College of Law, such members not to include the Dean of Academic Affairs or the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs.

B.  The Dean of the Law College shall have authority to remove any member of the Honor Council for good cause.

 

C.  Replacements
               

  1. If a faculty member of the Honor Council has a conflict of interest or is temporarily not available to serve, the Dean of the College of Law shall appoint a temporary replacement.
  2. If a faculty member of the Honor Council becomes unavailable for service for a substantial period, so that the work of the Council would be compromised, the Dean of the Law College shall appoint a permanent replacement.
  3. If a student member has a conflict of interest or is unavailable to serve for a semester or less, the president of the Student Bar Association may nominate a replacement, subject to the approval of the Dean of the College of Law.
  4. If a student member becomes unavailable for more than one semester, the president of the Student Bar Association shall nominate another student to fill the vacancy using the procedures employed for filling student positions normally.

 

Section 7: Procedures

A.  Initial Report of Alleged Violations
               
1.  Any report of an alleged Honor Code violation shall be made in confidence to the Dean of Academic Affairs or the professor of the course implicated, who shall then report the allegation to the Dean of Academic Affairs.

2.  The Dean of Academic Affairs, and any professor hearing a report of an alleged violation shall strive to preserve the anonymity of the reporting student unless circumstances or the procedures of the Honor Code dictate otherwise. 

B.  Preliminary Investigation
1.  After learning of any alleged Honor Code violation, the Dean of Academic Affairs shall determine whether, if true, the facts alleged constitute an Honor Code violation.  The Academic Dean may consult with the reporting student, professor, and Dean of Student Affairs.  If the Dean of Academic Affairs and the Dean of Student Affairs both agree that the facts alleged do not constitute an Honor Code violation, no further action shall be taken, no record shall be made or maintained in the reported student's record, and the matter shall be considered concluded.

2. If the Dean of Academic Affairs concludes that reported facts would, if true, amount to a violation of the Honor Code, the same shall conduct a preliminary, informal investigation to determine whether there is a substantial basis for the facts as alleged.  The Dean of Academic Affairs may contact any member of the faculty, staff or students who may have information about the alleged Honor Code violation, including the standards to be applied in any class or exam setting.  The Academic Dean may disclose the identity of the accused student and any reporting person to the faculty or staff member as necessary for conducting the investigation, but this information shall be kept confidential from all other persons during preliminary investigation.  The Dean of Academic Affairs may contact the accused student, but shall not as part of the preliminary investigation disclose the identity of the reporting person without the consent of the reporting person.

3.  If a preliminary investigation indicates to the satisfaction of the Dean of Academic Affairs that the facts found do not indicate an Honor Code violation has occurred, he or she shall take no further action, no record shall be made or maintained in the reported student's record, and the matter shall be considered concluded.

4.  If, after preliminary investigation, the Dean of Academic Affairs is unsure whether an Honor Code violation has occurred, the Dean of Academic Affairs may refer the matter to the Honor Council for preliminary determination of whether the facts as found indicate a violation of the Honor Code has occurred.

5. If a preliminary investigation by the Dean of Academic Affairs or the Honor Council indicates that an Honor Code violation has occurred, the Dean of Academic Affairs must promptly inform the student implicated, and interview the student about the matter.

6. If after consulting with the student accused and, as appropriate, after consulting with the Honor Council, the Dean of Academic Affairs concludes that the facts found do not indicate an Honor Code violation, no further action shall be taken, no record shall be made or maintained in the reported student's record, and the matter shall be considered concluded.

7.  If a preliminary investigation indicates that an Honor Code violation has occurred, and the accused student, after being consulted, substantially disagrees with the facts as found in the preliminary investigation and wishes to contest the findings, or agrees with the facts as found but maintains that they do not indicate that an Honor Code violation has occurred, the matter shall be referred to the Honor Council to determine the relevant facts, if those facts constitute or indicate a violation of the Honor Code, and any sanction.

8.  Any student, including a student who is the subject of a preliminary investigation by the  Dean of Academic Affairs, may seek advice about the process from the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.  The Assistant Dean's role is not to act as formal counsel for the student in proceedings, but the Assistant Dean may properly act to help ensure fairness to all, including fairness to any accused student.

C.  Admitted Violations
1. Procedure When a Student Admits a Violation to an Instructor
If at any time a student admits to having violated the Honor Code with respect to work being supervised or graded by an instructor at the College and that student and the affected instructor agree on an appropriate punishment, the instructor must report the admitted violation and the agreed punishment to the Academic Dean.  Upon consultation with the Chair of the Honor Council (who may, but is not required to convene the entire Council to consider the matter), the Academic Dean has authority to approve such an arrangement, require modification by the instructor, or refer the matter to the Honor Council for evaluation or full proceedings.

2.  Procedure When an Accused Student Admits a Violation to the Academic Dean
If, at any time a student admits a violation of the Honor Code to the Academic Dean, the Academic Dean must conduct a preliminary investigation to verify the nature of the violation, if it has not already been done, which may include consultation with the instructor of any implicated course or the supervisor of any affected work.  If the investigation confirms the nature of the violation, and the confessing student agrees with the characterization of the matter as concluded by the Academic Dean, whether the matter is then referred to the Honor Council for proceedings is within the discretion of the Academic Dean.  Instead, after consulting with the Chair of the Honor Council (who may, but is not required to convene the entire Council to consider the matter), the Academic Dean may propose a sanction for the violation by notifying the student in writing.  The sanction proposed may take into account circumstances beyond those that established guilt.  If the student accepts the sanction, any reporting person will be notified that the violator has acknowledged facts in substantial agreement with the allegations and taken responsibility, and that a summary of the matter including the disposition will be placed on file in the Dean’s office.  If the accused student rejects the sanction or withdraws the confession, the matter will be referred to the Honor Council for a determination.

3.  If a student admits to violating the Honor Code, agrees with the Academic Dean’s findings of fact, agrees with the Academic Dean’s characterization of the violation, but does not wish to proceed before the Honor Council, the student may appeal directly to the Dean for relief from the sanction proposed by the Academic Dean.  The proposed sanction will be imposed unless the Dean finds that it is not just and appropriate under the circumstances.  If the Dean makes such a finding, the Dean will determine and impose a sanction and that decision will be final, with no appeal to the Honor Council.  If the Dean finds the sanction proposed by the Academic Dean to be just and appropriate, the sanction will be imposed with no further right of appeal.

4.  In all cases where a student admits to a violation, and the violation is confirmed by the Academic Dean, the Academic Dean shall present to the Dean of the College a summary of the admissions, findings, and disposition, and shall record the matter and its disposition in the student’s file where it shall become either a temporary or a permanent part of the student's academic record, as determined by the Academic Dean.  Upon request by the student, and the passage of five years, the sanction may be removed from the record in the discretion of the Dean.  Unless the accused student requests otherwise, the student's name shall be omitted from the summary provided to the Dean.

D.  Contested Violations and Evidentiary Hearing

1.  If the Academic Dean after preliminary investigation determines that the facts as discovered indicate an Honor Code violation, but the accused student contests the Academic Dean’s findings, or maintains that the facts found do not indicate any Honor Code violation, the Academic Dean shall appoint a prosecutor from the faculty or administration and schedule an Honor Council evidentiary hearing.

2. The Prosecutor.  An Honor Code violation prosecutor may be a disinterested member of the faculty or an administrator.
                a. A prosecutor does not have authority to decline to prosecute a case.  The prosecutor may, however, recommend to the Academic Dean a re-consideration of charges, which the Academic Dean may consider as part of the preliminary investigation, and respond accordingly.
                b. A prosecutor may resign at will.

3. Notice.  The accused student must be provided written notice of an Honor Council hearing at least fourteen calendar days prior to the hearing date.  The accused student may request an expedited hearing which may be granted at the discretion of the Honor Council.  Notice shall include the following:

  • A statement of the alleged Honor Code violation, including a narrative identifying with particularity the date, time, and place where any alleged misconduct occurred, and the actions indicative of an Honor Code violation;
  • Relevant Honor Code provisions;
  • A summary of the evidence to be presented;
  • A list of the witnesses to be called;
  • A copy of any tangible evidence to be offered in the hearing; and
  • The time and place of the hearing.
  • A student may employ outside counsel or be assisted by another individual.

4. At least seven days before an Honor Council hearing, an accused student may supply the Academic Dean with a list of witnesses and evidence the accused wishes to be present at the hearing.  The Academic Dean shall inform the desired witnesses that their presence is requested at the Honor Council and for what purpose and, if they are faculty members or students at the Law College, remind them of their obligation to cooperate under this Honor Code.  The Academic Dean shall also contact persons having custody of desired evidence and similarly inform them that the evidence is requested at the Honor Council meeting and, if they are faculty members or students at the Law College, remind them of their obligation to cooperate under this Honor Code.

5. Upon request by the accused student, the hearing may be rescheduled in whole or in part if a majority of the Honor Council determines that it would be inappropriate to conduct the hearing at the scheduled time, for example if needed testimony will not be available until a later time.  This request may be entertained by the Honor Council at any time, including after the hearing has begun.  The decision of the Honor Council as to whether to postpone all or part of a hearing is final.

6. If an accused student has exercised his right to demand a hearing, but refuses to attend all or part of the hearing demanded, without requesting that the hearing be re-scheduled, the Honor Council may proceed to hear the case in the absence of the accused student, who will be bound by the Council decision as if present.

7. Honor Council hearings shall be closed to the public, unless an open hearing is requested by the accused student and the Honor Council agrees to the request.  If the hearing is open to the public, the time and place of the hearing shall be provided to the Student Bar Association and posted in either hard copy at appropriate locations around the law school or in electronic format to the student listserv at least three calendar days prior to the hearing.  A video recording of the hearing shall be made by the College at the request of the Honor Council, the accused student, or the Academic Dean, and a copy shall be provided to the accused student at the student's request.

8. Hearing Procedure
                a.  An Honor Council quorum is: all members present.  If any member is absent, the Council is not quorate.  See Section 6.C. for replacement procedures.
                b. The Honor Council shall admit any evidence that it considers relevant and reliable.
                c. The prosecutor shall first present evidence that the accused student has committed an Honor Code violation.
                d. The accused student (or his or her counsel or representative) may then present evidence to refute or mitigate the charge.
                e. Each side may present a rebuttal case, at the discretion of the Honor Council, including new evidence that goes beyond the scope of the initial presentations, but if either side develops its case beyond that initially presented, the other side may be allowed to present a further rebuttal.
                f. Opportunity for cross-examination shall be provided.
                g. Closing arguments may be presented, at the discretion of the Honor Council, and the time allotted for such arguments is also within the discretion of the Council.
                h.  After the relevant evidence has been presented by the prosecutor and the accused student, and closing arguments if any, the Honor Council shall declare the evidentiary hearing closed.  
                i. Any matter pertaining to the conduct of a hearing not covered in this Section 7, is left to the discretion of the Honor Council.

9.  At any time prior to or during the hearing, the accused student, the Academic Dean, or any member of the Honor Council may ask the Honor Council to determine that the evidence, taken as true, does not constitute an Honor Code violation.  If the Honor Council determines by a unanimous vote that the evidence, taken as true, does not constitute an Honor Code violation, the matter shall be dismissed.

10. Determination of Guilt
                a. If the Council finds that the prosecutor has presented reliable, clear and convincing evidence of an Honor Code violation by the accused student, it must find the accused student guilty.
                b. To find any accused guilty, at least four members of the Honor Council must vote in favor of guilt.  The fifth vote may either abstain or vote in favor of innocence.

11. Notification of Findings
                a.  The Honor Council shall notify the Academic Dean and the accused student of its decision, including its findings, within three days of the close of the evidentiary hearing, by mailing or by emailing a copy of the decision.

12. Announcement of Sanctions
                a. The Honor Council may announce sanctions in the same communication by which it announces its verdict.
                b. Sanctions must be announced within fourteen calendar days following the close of the evidentiary hearing by mailing or emailing a copy of the decision to the student.
                c. The Honor Council may, in its discretion, consider additional information from the accused or from the Academic Dean if such information is relevant to determination of the appropriate sanctions, or to mitigate their severity.  The Honor Council may require such information to be submitted in writing, or may convene a further hearing.
                d. See Section 8 below for example sanctions.

13. Records of Hearings
                a.  If the sanction imposed by the Honor Council so warrants, a summary of the hearing, the Honor Council's findings, and the sanction imposed shall become either a temporary or a permanent part of the student's academic record and must, while on record, be reported to the Character and Fitness committees of any bar to which the student applies for admission.
                b. Upon request by the student, and the passage of five years, the sanction may be removed from the record in the discretion of the Dean.
                c. Regardless of the outcome of an evidentiary hearing, the Honor Council shall provide a summary of the hearing, the Honor Council's findings, and the sanction imposed, if any, to the Dean.  Unless the accused student requests otherwise, the student's name shall be deleted from the summary.

E.  Prompt Disposition
                1. The Dean and the Honor Council shall complete all procedures and dispose of the case as promptly as is reasonably possible.
                2. To be entertained, charges of any misconduct must be brought within one year of the last substantive action in any course of misconduct governed by the Honor Code.

 

Section 8: Sanctions

A. The Academic Dean (in the case of an admitted violation) or the Honor Council (in case of a hearing concluding in a finding of guilt) may impose one or more of the following sanctions:
1.  Dismissal from the College of Law;
2.  Suspension from the College of Law for a specified time period;
3.  Mandatory failing grade or lowering of grade in the course involved;
4.  Written reprimand or record of the violation and sanction if any, either temporarily or permanently placed in the student’s academic record;
5. Monetary fines or restitution to third parties as appropriate;
6.  Formal notification of the Honor Code violation to the instructor of the course involved;
7. Academic probation;
or
8.  Other sanctions the Academic Dean or the Honor Council finds reasonable and appropriate under the circumstances.

B.  Course Grades
If an alleged violation involves course work, pending the outcome of the process the course instructor shall evaluate the work and assign a grade based upon the academic merits of the work apart from any alleged Honor Code violation.  If a grade must be reported to the Law College Registrar prior to disposition of the alleged Honor Code violation, a grade of "Incomplete" shall be reported.  After a final disposition of the alleged violation has been made, the appropriate grade shall be reported and entered for the student.

 

Section 9: Student Appeals

 

A.  Grounds for Appeal - A student found after a hearing to have violated the Honor Code may appeal to the Dean of the College of Law on any of the following grounds:
1.  The hearing was not conducted in accordance with procedures set forth in the Honor Code or was conducted in a manner unreasonably prejudicial against the accused, and the outcome was in fact influenced thereby;
2.  The finding that the student violated the Honor Code is not supported by clear and convincing evidence as disclosed by the record;
3.  The conduct found to have been engaged in by the student does not constitute a violation of the Honor Code;
4.  The sanction imposed by the Honor Council is unjust or inappropriate.

B.  Limitations of Appeals
                1. If the student fails to file a written appeal of the sanction with the Dean within fourteen calendar days, no appeal will be allowed and the sanction proposed by the Academic Dean will be imposed.

                2. When a student has admitted an Honor Code violation, which has then been confirmed by the Academic Dean’s investigation without demurral by the student, the student may not appeal to the Dean the finding of the underlying violation, but only the appropriateness of the sanction imposed.

C.  Procedure and Disposition
1.  The appeal must set forth the grounds for appeal in writing, be signed by the student, and be delivered to the Dean of the College within fourteen calendar days after the decision is sent by mail or email to the student by the Honor Council or the Academic Dean.  If no appeal has been delivered to the office of the Dean by the fifteenth day after notification was sent to the student, the decision and sanction are both final and the matter is closed.
2.  The Dean shall review those aspects of the record, including but not necessarily limited to the summary provided him, relevant to the specified grounds for appeal.
3.  The Dean, making an independent review of all aspects of any matter, and the decision of the Honor Council or Academic Dean, may affirm the decision, reverse in whole or in part, or remand for further proceedings.  However, the Dean may not increase the severity of the sanction imposed below.
4.  The Dean shall state, in writing, the grounds upon which his or her decision is based and shall keep a summary of the decision on file and available for review by any member of the College of Law community.  Unless the appellant student requests otherwise, the student's name shall be deleted from the summary.
5.  The decision of the Dean shall be final.

 

Section 10: Public Records of Violations & Sanctions

 

A. Any finding of an Honor Code violation shall be included in a summary file in the Dean’s office which describes the nature of the allegation, the findings, and any disposition.  This file shall be available for review by faculty, students, and staff.  Unless the accused student requests otherwise, the student's name shall be omitted from the summary.  The summary record of Honor Code violations and dispositions cannot be waived.

B. This provision shall not prohibit the Dean or Academic Dean from discussing or communicating the existence of an Honor Council proceeding and its findings and any sanction, or the existence of an admitted Honor Code violation, the basis, and any sanctions to the law school community when the Dean and Academic Dean believe it is appropriate to do so.

 

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Compliance with the University's Code of Conduct

Law students are required to comply with the University's Code of Conduct.  Reprehensible conduct or failure to comply with University regulations may result in a student's dismissal from a course or from the University at any time. Such action is posted on the student's academic record. Students suspended from the University are denied student privileges during the period of suspension, and may not register for correspondence work except with permission of the dean of the college in which they were previously enrolled. They may not enroll for Continuing Education courses, nor establish credit by examination during the period of suspension. The University's Code of Conduct may be downloaded from this link.

 

APPENDIX:  UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA "NONDISCRIMINATION AND ANTI-HARASSMENT POLICY

 

The University of Arizona is committed to creating and maintaining an environment free of discrimination.  In support of this commitment, the University prohibits discrimination, including harassment and retaliation, based on a protected classification, including race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or genetic information.  The University encourages anyone who believes he or she has been the subject of discrimination to report the matter immediately as described in the section below on Reporting Complaints to University Offices.  All members of the University community are responsible for participating in creating a campus environment free from all forms of prohibited discrimination and for cooperating with the University officials who investigate allegations of policy violations.

 

University Obligations

The University will take prompt and appropriate action to:  (1) thoroughly investigate complaints of discrimination described in this policy; and (2) prevent, correct and, if necessary, discipline individuals who engage in behavior that violates this policy in accordance with existing University policies.

 

Applicability and Enforcement of Policy

This policy applies to:

  • All University employees in all aspects of their employment relationship with the University;
  • All University students in all aspects of their participation in the University's educational programs and activities;
  • All University applicants, whether for employment of for admission to educational or University-sponsored programs, activities, or facilities;
  • All persons or groups participating in or accessing University-sponsored programs, activities, or facilities; and
  • All vendors or contractors in all aspects of their relationship with the University.

Enforcement of this policy is subject to constitutional protections related to freedom of speech, association, and the press.

 

Prohibited Discrimination, Including Harassment and Retaliation

Discrimination

Discrimination occurs when an individual, or group of individuals, is treated adversely because they belong to a classification of individuals that is protected from discrimination by a federal or state statute or University policy as set forth above.  The failure to provide reasonable accommodations required by law or University policy based on disability or religious practice may constitute discrimination.

 

Harassment

Harassment is a specific form of discrimination.  It is unwelcome behavior, based on a protected classification, that a reasonable person would perceive to be sufficiently severe or pervasive to create an intimidating , hostile, or offensive environment for academic pursuits, employment, or participation in University-sponsored activities.  Additionally, sexual harassment, whether between individuals of the same or different sex, includes unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature that is made, either explicitly or implicitly, a condition of an individual's education, employment, or participation in a University program or activity, and/or when the submission to or rejection of such conduct is a factor in decisions affecting that individual's education, employment, or participation in University-sponsored activities.

Harassing conduct may take many forms, including verbal acts and name calling, as well as nonverbal behavior, such as graphic, electronic, and written statements, or conduct that is physically offensive, harmful, or threatening.

 

Retaliation

Retaliation occurs when an adverse action is taken against an individual for engaging in protected activity.  Protected activity consists of:  (1) opposing conduct reasonably believed to constitute discrimination, including harassment, which violates a nondiscrimination statute or which University policy prohibits; (2) filing a complaint about such practice; or (3) testifying, assisting, or participating in any manner in an investigation or other proceeding related to a discrimination complaint.  Adverse actions that are reasonably likely to deter a complaining individual or others from engaging in protected activity are prohibited.

 

Supervisory Responsibilities to Prevent and Report Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation

Employees or agents of the University who (a) supervise other employees, graduate or undergraduate students, contractors, or agents; (b) teach or advise students or groups; or (c) have management authority related to a University-sponsored program or activity are required to:

  • Engage in appropriate measures to prevent violations of this policy; and
  • Upon receiving a report or having a reasonable basis to suspect that potential discrimination, harassment, or retaliation has occurred or is occurring, promptly notify and provide all available information and documentation either to the Dean of Students Office if the alleged policy violator is a student, or to the Office of Institutional Equity for all other matters.

The Dean of Students Office will promptly notify the Office of Institutional Equity of all reports of potential discrimination, harassment, or retaliation that it receives.

 

Reporting Discrimination, Harassment or Retaliation

Reporting Complaints to University Offices

An individual who believes that he or she has been subjected to discrimination, harassment, or retaliation in violation of this policy should report the matter immediately as set forth below to obtain information about resolving concerns, including complaint-filing options and procedures, and to enable the University to take prompt remedial action.  If the alleged policy violator is a University student, the individual who has been the subject of discrimination, harassment or retaliation in violation of this should contact:

Dean of Students

Dean of Students Office

Old Main 203

P.O. Box 210021

Tucson, AZ  85721-0021

(520) 621-7057

dos-deanofstudents@email.arizona.edu

 

For all other instances, the recipient of the alleged conduct should contact:

Director

Office of Institutional Equity

University Services Building, Room 217

P.O. Box 21058

Tucson, AZ  85721-0158

(520) 621-9449

equity@email.arizona.edu

 

If the alleged policy violator is employed by the Dean of Students Office or the Office of Institutional Equity, then the individual who has been the subject of discrimination, harassment or retaliation in violation of this policy may contact the Executive Vice President and Provost.  See http://provost.arizona.edu/provosts_office online for contact information.

 

Good Faith Allegations

Because of the nature of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation complaints, allegations often cannot be substantiated by direct evidence other than the complaining individual's own statement.  Lack of corroborating evidence should not discourage individuals from seeking relief under this policy.  No adverse action will be taken against an individual who makes a good faith allegation of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation under this policy, even if an investigation fails to substantiate the allegation.  However, individuals who make dishonest statements or make statements with willful disregard for the truth during an investigation or enforcement procedure under this policy may be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with existing University policies.

 

Anonymous Inquiries and Complaints

Members of the University community may contact the Office of Institutional Equity or the Dean of Students Office at any time to ask questions about discrimination, harassment, retaliation, or complaint-filing procedures and may provide information without disclosing their names.  This provision does not relieve managers, supervisors, instructors, or advisors of their responsibility to promptly report under this policy.

 

Reporting Complaints to Outside Agencies

University employees and students have the right to file discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation complaints with outside agencies as well as with the University's Office of Institutional Equity or the Dean of Students Office.  If an individual files a complaint with an external agency, the filing will not affect the University's investigation concerning the same or similar events.

 

Consequences of Policy Violations

Members of the University community who violate this policy will be subject to disciplinary action that could include reprimand, demotion, denial of promotion, termination from employment or from educational programs, or other appropriate administrative action.

 

Affiliated Entities

University employees or students who work or study at a worksite or program of an institution with which the University has entered into an Affiliation Agreement (Affiliate) are subject to this policy while at such worksite or participating in such program.  Similarly, Affiliates are obligated under agreements with the University to comply with all applicable state and federal statutes and regulations regarding equal employment opportunity and nondiscrimination.  If a University employee or student believes that he or she has been subjected to discrimination, harassment, or retaliation while working at or participating in a program of an Affiliate in violation of this policy, he or she should contact the Office of Institutional Equity or the Dean of Students Office in accordance with the reporting provisions of this policy.

 

Confidentiality

Employees of the Office of Institutional Equity, employees of the Dean of Students Office, and all responsible administrators who receive reports of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation shall maintain the confidentiality of the information they receive, except where disclosure is required by law or is necessary to facilitate legitimate University processes, including the investigation and resolution of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation allegations.

 

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Attendance and Class Participation Policy

 

  • The College of Law faculty recommends that each professor inform students of the following policy during the first week of class.  Failure to do so, however, shall not prevent its application as provided below.

 

  • The College of Law expects students to attend classes regularly, complete assignments in a timely manner, and be prepared for class.  A student may be (1) dropped from a course, or (2) refused permission to continue to be enrolled in a course, to take the final examination in a course, or to otherwise complete a course, for any of the following reasons: (a) an excessive number of absences, (b) an excessive number of instances of not completing class assignments or not completing them in a timely manner, or (c) an excessive number of instances of not being prepared for class.  Unexcused absences in excess of ten percent of the regularly scheduled classes in a course shall be considered an excessive number of absences for purposes of this section.

 

  • Before a professor drops a student from a course or refuses a student permission to continue to be enrolled in a course, to take the final examination, or to otherwise complete a course, the professor shall provide adequate notice to the student.  A professor may provide adequate notice to the student in either one of two ways: (1) by giving a reasonably detailed notice to the entire class at the beginning of the semester that students may be dropped from the course or denied permission to take the final examination or otherwise complete the course for any of the reasons listed above, or (2) by providing notice to an individual student who is in danger of being dropped from the course or refused permission to otherwise complete the course.

 

  • Notice to the entire class may be given by a written statement in the course syllabus explicitly notifying students that failure to attend class, to be prepared for class, or to complete assignments in a timely manner may result in a professor's dropping the student from the course or in the student being refused permission to take the final examination or otherwise complete the course. In such case, no further notice is required, and no individual notice is necessary.

 

  • If a professor has given notice to the entire class as provided above, the professor may, but is not required to, give individual notice to a student before dropping that student from the course.  Notice to an individual student may be provided by sending the student a notice to the student's mailing address on file with the College of Law Registrar indicating the following: that the student will be dropped from the course if the student has not, within ten days from the date of mailing of the notice, demonstrated to the Professor's satisfaction the student's intention to participate fully in the class activities for the remainder of the semester.  Thereafter, no additional prior notice is required before dropping the student from the course if the student fails to complete any requirement for the course, including attending class.

 

  • When a student is dropped from a course before the end of the 3rd week of class in the fall or spring semesters or the 1st week in a Summer Session term, the course will be deleted from the student's record at the end of the semester or term.  When a student is dropped, or refused permission to take the final examination or otherwise complete the course, later than that, a grade of "W" shall be entered on the student's record.

 

  • A professor may adopt a more stringent policy on class attendance than that contained above if the students are given notice.

 

  • An instructor who intends to make class participation a specific percentage of the final grade in a course shall indicate to the class at the beginning of the semester what percentage of the final grade will be based on class participation.  If a given percentage is not established and announced at the beginning of the semester, class participation may only directly be taken into account for purposes of raising the final grade of a particular student or students; in that case, a student's final grade may not be increased by more than one letter grade.  The mandatory/mean curve shall be applied after taking class participation into account, even though adjustments for class participation may have the indirect effect of lowering some students’ grades.

 

  • Unless approved by the appropriate University or College official as a reasonable accommodation of a disability, illness, or emergency, students may not audio or video-tape, stream, or by any other method (electronic, digital, or otherwise) capture or transmit class sessions without the prior approval of the course instructor. Even when approved, in no case shall students make copies of, distribute to others, or otherwise disseminate in any manner such capture or transmission of class sessions without the further express written permission of the instructor. 

 

 

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Accommodations for Students With Disabilities

 

The College of Law is committed to equal educational opportunities for students with disabilities.


The Disability Resource Center ("DRC") at the University of Arizona (http://drc.arizona.edu/) is the office designated by the University to receive requests for reasonable accommodations. A student who, because of disability, seeks a reasonable accommodation for, among others, attendance, class preparation, or class participation, or who anticipates barriers related to the format or requirements of the course, must provide documentation of the disability to the DRC and meet with a DRC Access Consultant to discuss accommodations.  If the DRC determines that a disability-related accommodation is necessary, this will be communicated to the Dean of Students at the College of Law who will make the necessary arrangements with all affected faculty.


Students who have temporary disabilities, illnesses, or other emergencies that require some accommodation in order to meet class requirements should consult with the Dean of Students at the College of Law who will determine what, if any, accommodation is necessary.  The Dean of Students will make the necessary arrangements with all affected faculty.


Disability Resource Center; Cheryl Muller, Assistant Director., 621-3268 (main office line); 621-9170 (direct line); mullerc@email.arizona.edu; http://drc.arizona.edu/


Dean of Students at the College of Law, Willie Jordan-Curtis, Ph.D., J.D., 621-8602

jordancu@email.arizona.edu

 

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Curriculum

 

J.D. Program

 

 

 

 

LL.M. and S.J.D. Programs in Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy  Requirements (IPLP)

 

 

 

 

LL.M. and S.J.D. Programs in International Trade and Business Law Requirements

(ITBL)

  

 

 

 

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J.D. Program - Requirements & Overview

 

Full-Time Program

Thorough preparation, regular and timely attendance, and active participation are crucial to successful law study.  The University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law offers a full-time course of study.  The College of Law does not offer a part-time program.  The course of study leading to the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree is designed to be completed in 6 semesters, or their equivalent, of resident study in accredited law schools. The College of Law adheres to the American Bar Association (ABA), the College's accrediting body, standard that students must successfully complete the J.D. degree requirements within seven years of the student's first enrollment at the College of Law.

 

Requirements Subject to Change

Requirements for completion of the J.D. course of study may change from time to time as a result of changes required by the ABA, or any changes otherwise approved by the College of Law faculty.  Students should check the current version of this Student Handbook on the College of Law website for changes that may be made during the student's matriculation. At the end of the student's J.D. course of study, if requirements for graduation have not been satisfied, the degree will not be granted. For this reason, students must remain currently informed about all policies and other information that bear directly on completing a degree program.  Students are responsible for checking, on a regular basis, their University of Arizona email accounts and information provided on the College of Law and University of Arizona websites.

 

Course, Unit, GPA Requirements

To meet J.D. graduation requirements, students beginning law study in the fall 2010 and after must successfully complete at least 88 units of law study, including required first year and upper level courses, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.000(C) and at least 37 graded law units beyond the first year. Students beginning work on their J.D. at the College of Law before fall 2010 must successfully complete at least 85 units to meet J.D. unit requirements and a minimum of 36 graded College of Law units after completing their first year.  In addition, each student must complete the following upper level courses or requirements: Evidence, Legal Profession, and an Advanced Research and Writing paper (otherwise known as the "Substantial Paper.")  Finally, all students must satisfactorily complete an upper-level Professional Skills course (see below), whether graded or non-graded.  Please note: When enrolling in law courses available for graded credit, J.D. students do not have a Pass/Fail option.  LL.M. students take all courses on a Pass/Fail basis; LL.M. students do not have a graded option.

    

Summer Study and Early Graduation

J.D. students are generally expected to graduate within three (3) years of the date of matriculation.  The course of study may be accelerated by summer study, but the earliest that a student is eligible for graduation is the end of the fall semester of the third academic year.  If a student wishes to graduate at the end of the fall semester of the third academic year, he or she must attend summer school both following the first and second year of law study, earn at least 10 summer school units total (a minimum of five (5) each summer), and must consult the College Registrar, before the first summer session following the first year of law school, to be sure the necessary number of summer school units are taken.  Students must obtain permission from the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs to enroll in more than six (6) units over any one summer.  Students should be aware that the J.D. program of study is intended to take three years, and that summer school offerings at the College of Law are not designed to provide for accelerated graduation.

 

Reduced Academic Load

Students who receive permission based on good cause from the Executive Committee or its designate, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Dr. Willie Jordan-Curtis, may take a reduced load each semester of their first year, as well as in the second and third years.  Students taking a reduced load during their first year of law studies must complete the first year courses not taken their first year during their second year of law studies.  The student must take the course(s) from the  same instructor(s) who  taught the course(s) in  the student's reduced-load semester(s).  The "same professor" requirement will only be waived in the event that the instructor who taught the course during the reduced-load semester is not teaching the course during the student's second year.

 

Required Courses -- First Year
First-year J.D. students are required to register for the entire prescribed course of first-year studies, which includes one elective in the second semester from among 3-unit graded courses offered by the College of Law that have no prerequisites (or recommended prior courses), that the instructor is willing to offer to 1Ls, that are not clinics or externships and that are scheduled so as not to be in conflict with required 1L courses and which, in the opinion of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, are appropriate as a first-year course.  These elective options may include classes emphasizing theoretical approaches to the law as well as courses concerned with specific subjects.   

 

Second and third-year students must carry between 13 and 18 units each semester.  Students may not enroll for more than 18 units in any one semester. Exceptions for a course load of fewer than 13 units must be approved by the Executive Committee or Dr. Willie Jordan-Curtis.  However, third-year students may take fewer than 13 units per semester, with a minimum 10 units, at the beginning of their fifth semester, if they need fewer than 26 units to graduate.

 

First Year, First Semester

Subject
Units
Contracts (Law 600A)
4
Introduction to Legal Process & Civil Procedure (Law 601A)
4
Torts (Law 604A)
4
Legal Process, Analysis, and Writing (Law 603P)
2
Introduction to Legal Research (Law 603Q) 1
Total
15

First Year, Second Semester

Subject
Units
Property (Law 605)
4
Limited Elective Choice
3
Criminal Procedure (Law 602)
3
Constitutional Law (Law 606)
3
Legal Process, Analysis, and Writing (Law 603P)                  2
Total
15

 

Specific Course Requirements Beyond First Year

Subject
Units
Evidence (Law 608)
3 or 4
The Legal Profession (Law 609)
2 or 3
Professional Skills Course
One of Courses Listed Below
Substantial Paper*
3-4

 

*Substantial Paper Requirements

Rules Governing Satisfaction of Substantial Paper Requirement

(A) Purpose. 

The Substantial Paper Requirement is designed to provide a student with the experience of deep, professional engagement with a legal topic or issue. The student will elucidate the goals of the paper in coordination with his/her advisor; perform extensive legal research in the relevant doctrinal area (including, as appropriate, the scholarly literature); craft an original argument that advances the goals of the paper; develop this argument via sustained, organized legal argument; and situate his / her contribution within the larger project.

 

(B) General Requirement

To graduate, each student must complete a substantial paper of satisfactory professional quality that is closely supervised by a faculty member and that involves significant independent research and analysis of a legal topic or issue.

 

(C) Methods of Satisfying General Requirement

Students may complete this requirement in one of three ways:

  1. Complete a three-unit substantial paper seminar (offered under course number LAW 696N);
  2. Complete a “Student-Initiated Substantial Paper” (offered as LAW 696N § 3); or
  3. As a member of the Arizona Law Review, Arizona Journal of International & Comparative Law, or Arizona Journal of Environmental Law and Policy, write a Note of publishable quality under the supervision of a faculty member AND earn at least four units as provided in section (g)(2).

 

(D) Requirements for Substantial Paper

Any substantial paper must meet these requirements:

  1. The paper must be at least 7,500 words in length, excluding footnotes, tables of authority, and other supporting documentation;
  2. The student must submit an abstract, an outline, and at least one rough draft of the paper to the supervising faculty member for review and comment; and
  3. The student must write and submit a final draft of the paper that meaningfully responds to the supervising faculty member’s comments on previous drafts.

 

(E) Oral Presentation Requirement. 

To satisfy the substantial paper requirement, the student must make an oral presentation of the paper to the students in the seminar or to another group of students and faculty, including the supervising professor, at a time to be scheduled by the professor.  This presentation generally should take place after the student has submitted a rough draft but before the student has submitted the final draft, and generally towards the end of the semester.

 

(F) Limitation on Award of Student-Initiated Substantial Paper Units.
  1. Unless the student is required to re-enroll as a result of receiving a failing grade, a student may enroll only once for a “Student-Initiated Substantial Paper” (LAW 696N §3).  A student who wishes to perform additional in-depth research and writing under the individualized supervision of a faculty member may do so as an Independent Study.
  2. In the same semester, a student may not register both for a “Student-Initiated Substantial Paper” (LAW 696N §3) and a substantial paper seminar (LAW 696N) where the topic of the student’s student-initiated paper is addressed by the seminar course.  An exception will be made where the student demonstrates to the satisfaction of the academic dean that the topics are sufficiently distinguishable to merit the units in both courses. 

 

(G) Faculty Supervision of Substantial Paper.
  1. Who may supervise:  Any tenured, tenure-eligible, continuing-status, and continuing-status-eligible faculty, as well as visiting assistant professors, professors of the practice, and faculty emeriti are eligible to supervise substantial papers.  Adjunct faculty and other faculty within the Law College, visiting faculty, and other faculty within the University of Arizona may supervise substantial papers with the approval of the academic dean.
  2. Supervision requirements:
    1. All faculty teaching a substantial paper seminar or supervising a student-initiated substantial paper should discuss the following topics, preferably during class or in some other way that effectively communicates their importance to students:
      1. Selecting a topic;
      2. Conducting preliminary research;
      3. Structuring a scholarly legal writing;
      4. Developing a thesis; and
      5. Structuring an oral presentation.
    2. All faculty teaching a substantial paper seminar, supervising a student-initiated substantial paper, or supervising a student Note must:
      1. Consult with the student on selection of a topic;
      2. Approve the topic;
      3. Review and consult with the student about a thesis for the paper and provide written or oral feedback after reviewing the thesis statement;
      4. Consult with the student about research;
      5. Review and provide written comments on an abstract;
      6. Review and provide written comments on an outline;
      7. Review and provide written and oral comments on a rough draft;
      8. Attend and give comments on oral presentation;
      9. Read final paper and assign grade for entire semester; and
      10. Work with student at the beginning of the semester to establish timeline for accomplishing 1-9.
    3. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs shall maintain, with the cooperation of the faculty, a list of faculty members eligible to supervise substantial papers, including Notes, and the areas of expertise and interest of those faculty members to direct students to the appropriate faculty member for supervision. 
    4. All tenured, tenure-eligible, continuing status and continuing status-eligible faculty members are expected to be available to supervise four (or more) substantial papers, including Notes, each academic year.  Other faculty are encouraged to supervise substantial papers, particularly within their areas of expertise.
    5. All faculty members supervising substantial papers shall inform the Office of Faculty Support of the details of the oral presentations of their students so that the law community may attend or participate. 

     

(H) Special Rules Governing Students Who Satisfy Substantial Paper Requirement through Section (c)(3). 
  1. Total Units.  Students who satisfy the substantial paper requirement as members of the Law Review, AJICL, or AJELP by writing a note of publishable quality under faculty supervision must also earn at least four units of credit as provided in section 2-109(g)(2)
  2. Earning Units.  A second-year student may earn three units of credit by completing one Note of publishable quality.  A third-year student may earn three units of credit for serving on the editorial board, two units of credit for participating as a third-year writer and completing a second publishable note, or one unit of credit for work in the support and production areas of the Law Review or Journals.
  3. Definition. A “Note” is an extensively researched paper on a narrowly defined legal topic. It is a thorough analysis and discussion of a specific legal issue, but it does not necessarily focus on a single case. A Note of “publishable quality” thoroughly addresses a novel topic with exhaustive research, correct citations to credible sources, as well as clear, cogent, and well-organized writing. It is key that the Note topic is novel and that it is supported by original analysis. A topic can be novel even if the subject matter has been explored in other scholarly writings, so long as it analyzes an issue that has not already been thoroughly considered or it approaches the topic from an original angle.  A publishable quality Note contributes something new to legal scholarship.

 

 

Professional Skills Courses, including Clinics -- Overview
The academic program at the College of Law provides a wide range of opportunities for students to gain practical skills and real-life lawyering experiences. These experiences range from simulated courses such as Basic Trial Advocacy and Pre-Trial Litigation to real-life experiences such as working with judges in the Judicial Clerking program or working in public or governmental agencies representing clients in one of our Clinics.

 

Professional Skills Courses

Advanced Legal Research

Advanced Legal Writing & Introduction to
Appellate Advocacy (formerly Persuasive Communication)

Advanced Professionalism and Law Practice

Advanced Family Law Practice

Advanced Trial Advocacy

ASUA Interviewing

Basic Trial Advocacy

Case Studies in Public Interest

Clinics (any law clinic, in-house or external) 

Corporate Governance
Critical Race Practice
Entrepreneurship Program
Externships (all permanent and ad hoc)

Intellectual Property Transactional Drafting

 

 

International Human Rights Advocacy Workshop

Jessup Moot Court

Judicial Clerking Program

Mediation

Mock Trial Team

Moot Court (Second Year)

Negotiation and Mediation Advocacy

Negotiation of Employment Agreements

Patent Practice

Post-February Bar Courses (all)

Pretrial Litigation
Trade Secrets (FebBar)
Transactional Practice
White Collar Crime: Ethics and Compliance

 

 

 

 

Any other courses approved by the Vice-Dean.

 

In addition to the first year and upper-level courses required to be completed before graduation, the faculty has recommended that students complete the following recommended core courses:


Recommended Core Courses

Business Organizations (Law 616)
3 or 4
Estates & Trusts (Law 619)
3 or 4
Constitutional Law II (Law 615)
3 or 4

UCC Secured Transactions (633C)

3

Income Taxation (Law 646)
3 or 5
Criminal Law (Law 650)
2 or 3
Persuasive Communication (now Advanced Legal Writing and Intro. to Appellate Advocacy) (Law 653A)
3

 

Professional Skills Courses, including Clinics -- Overview

The academic program at the College of Law provides a wide range of opportunities for students to gain practical skills and real-life lawyering experiences. These experiences range from simulated courses such as Basic Trial Advocacy and Pre-Trial Litigation to real-life experiences such as working with judges in the Judicial Clerking program or working in public or governmental agencies representing clients in one of our Clinics.

 

Clinical Courses

General

For the purposes of this section, "clinical course" means a course that has a field and classroom component and requires an enrolled student, under the supervision of a licensed attorney, to represent clients and perform legal work on actual cases. A clinical course may be offered through an in-house or placement program. Restrictions on Enrollment and Compensation. A student on academic probation is not eligible to participate in a clinical course. A student may not be compensated for clinical work for which the student receives academic credit.

 

Units of Credit

A student may enroll in clinical courses for up to fourteen units of graded credit. A student who seeks to enroll in more than fourteen units of graded credits for clinical coursework must receive approval from the academic dean.

 

Grading

Student in-house clinics shall be graded on a graded or pass-fail basis; students in placement clinics shall be graded on a pass-fail only basis. [Section 2-302 (e) amended by faculty vote April 6, 2009.]

 

 

Clinics Requiring Student Practice Certification

To be eligible to enroll in a clinical course that requires that a student be certified pursuant to Student Practice Rules, a student must have completed three semesters of full-time law study, have completed Evidence (Law 608), and either have completed Legal Profession (Law 609) or be enrolled in it contemporaneously with the clinical course. Clinical courses covered by the Student Practice Rules include the Child and Family Law Clinic and the Prosecution and Defense and Attorney General clinics. For pre- or co-requisites for the other clinics, please consult the course descriptions published each semester with the College of Law course schedule on the College of Law website.

 

Other Professional Skills Courses

 

As indicated above, students may select from a broad range of other Professional Skill Courses to develop their practical skills. Among these are courses in basic and advanced trial advocacy, pre-trial litigation, appellate advocacy, advanced legal research, interviewing, mediation, mediation advocacy, patent practice, entrepreneurship, negotiating employment agreements, and others. 

 

STUDENTS SEEKING CREDIT FOR STUDY AT A FOREIGN SCHOOL

Programs & Requirements

 

Formal Exchange Programs

J.D. students at the College of Law may be eligible to participate in one-semester visits under three formal home-home exchange programs in which the College is a participant.

The three programs are:

  1. North American Consortium on Legal Education (NACLE).  Students may visit at a Mexican partner school, so long as the student is fluent in Spanish, or at one of four Canadian partner schools:  Dalhousie (Halifax); McGill (Montreal); Ottawa (Ottawa); and University of British Columbia (Vancouver).
  2. University of Puerto Rico Law School.  Although there are some courses offered in English, fluency in spoken and written Spanish is required.
  3. Universidat Jean Moulin, Lyon.

          

General Requirements 

J.D. students enrolled at the College of Law who have completed the first year of law studies, who are in good academic standing, and who have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher may apply to the Director of International Programs to visit for a semester through one of the exchange programs, and to transfer a maximum of 10 credits earned toward their J.D. degree.  Participation is not guaranteed due to the limited number of opportunities available.  Exchange visitors receive a graded transcript from the host school upon completion of the term, and the grades, if "C" (or its equivalent) or above, are posted to the student's UA official transcript as Pass/Fail and will not be considered "graded units" for purposes of satisfying the requirement that each student earn 37 graded units beyond the first year.  Students may not visit at an exchange program school except pursuant to the formal exchange program.

 

Application Process 

The number of students participating in these exchange programs is limited, so early application is advisable.  Application for the fall or spring semester of the following academic year generally must be made by March 1 of the previous academic year.  Application materials are available from the Program Coordinator of the International Trade Law Program.

 

Financial Matters

Because these are "home-home" exchange programs, College of Law students continue to pay their regular College of Law tuition and remain eligible for most financial aid, but do not pay tuition at the foreign institution, although they are likely to be responsible for paying certain relatively minor fees at the host institution, and in some instances health service costs.  Students are also responsible for their travel and living expenses.

 

Ad Hoc Visits to Foreign Law Schools

J.D. students enrolled at the College of Law who have completed the first year of law studies and have maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher, may, subject to the approval of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, apply to the Director of International Programs to attend classes at a foreign law school or program located in a country where the College does not have an existing exchange program, and to transfer credit earned at that school toward their J.D. degree.  If the Director of International Programs, considering the merits of the student's petition and applicable accreditation criteria, provisionally approves a visit, the student must then obtain approval from the Vice Dean for Academic Affairs, or his or her delegate, before enrolling in courses in order to confirm that credit for those courses may be transferred.  The principal issue is likely to be the quality of the education proposed at the proposed host school.

 

General Requirements

Transfer credit will be awarded only for graded courses where the student obtains a grade of "C" (or its equivalent) or higher.  Grades for transfer credits will not be included in the student's cumulative grade point average, and will not be considered "graded units" for purposes of satisfying the requirement that each student earn 37 graded units beyond the first year.  The maximum time that students may visit at another law school is one semester, and the maximum number of units they may transfer is 10.  Students who spend a semester studying abroad must still complete all required courses at the College of Law.  The faculty of the foreign school must possess academic credentials and experience in the legal profession similar to faculty at the College of Law.

 

Financial Matters

A student seeking to study at an institution which does not have an Exchange Agreement with the College of Law remains responsible for his or her regular College of Law tuition, and remains eligible for financial aid (including any funds awarded as scholarship).  Students are also responsible for their travel and living expenses.  The College will, however, credit against this obligation the amount, if any, of the tuition and mandatory fees that the student is required to pay at the foreign institution--not to exceed the amount of UA tuition.  In the case of such a partial reduction of the UA tuition, the student's scholarship award for that semester will also be reduced proportionately.

 

Procedures Applicable to All Semester Abroad Programs

 

Faculty Oversight

In the case of an approved visit under either North American Consortium on Legal Education (NACLE) or Universidat Jean Moulin, Lyon (see above description), the Director of the International Trade Law Program, in consultation with the student, will identify a College of Law faculty member who is responsible for approving course work and monitoring the study undertaken by the student at the foreign law school, including reviewing course materials and written work of the student.  A student participating in a foreign visit must, in consultation with the assigned faculty member, work out an approved course of study for which the student may be awarded a maximum of 10 credits.  The course of study must be related to the socio-legal environment of the foreign school's country or have an international or comparative focus and must, in advance of the visit, include a written plan that defines the educational objectives of the student and the methods that will be used to evaluate the student's attainment of those objectives.  The foreign school must also appoint an advisor for the student who supervises and monitors the student's study at the foreign school.

 

Reporting

The Vice Dean for Academic Affairs will annually file a report with the ABA Consultant's Office identifying the students, institutions, courses taken, credit hours granted, grades received, and names of advisors at both the parent school and the foreign institution.

 

Limitation on Number of Students

For ad hoc foreign visits, no more than six students may be approved to study at a particular foreign law school over any consecutive three-year period.  For schools with which we have a formal exchange program, no more than 12 students may be approved to study at a particular foreign law school over any consecutive three-year period.

 

Educational Objectives

The principal objectives of affording J.D. candidates the opportunity to spend a semester studying at a foreign law school include:  a) exposure to a different legal culture, including understanding the roles that lawyers play in other countries; b) exposure to different educational methodologies and approaches to legal problems; c) opportunities for the rigorous study of civil law systems going well beyond those available at most American law schools; d) opportunities to become acquainted with lawyers and law students in other jurisdictions; and e) opportunities for students to enhance their foreign language capabilities and their ability to communicate across cultures.  For ad hoc visits (see paragraph above), the foreign school must provide written assurance that these educational objectives can be achieved at the foreign school.

 

Summer Abroad Programs

J.D. students enrolled at the College of Law who have completed the first year of law studies and are in good academic standing and who wish to attend a summer abroad program sponsored by an ABA approved law school must receive permission from the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs.  If the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs approves attendance at a summer abroad program, the student must then obtain approval from the Vice Dean for Academic Affairs before enrolling in courses in order to confirm that credit for those courses may be transferred.  Students may earn no more than 1.5 credit hours per week, and no more than six units total.  Transfer credit will be awarded only for graded courses where the student obtains a grade of "C" (or its equivalent) or higher.  Grades for transfer credits will not be included in the student's cumulative grade point average, and will not be considered "graded units" for purposes of satisying the requirement that each student earn 37 graded units beyond the first year.  Students who participate in a summer abroad program must still complete all required courses at the College of Law.

College of Law Scholarship and/or grant funds may not be used, and will not be disbursed, during the period of time that a student is participating in a summer abroad program.  Students who participate in an ABA-approved summer abroad program may be eligible to receive financial aid in the form of loans and should coordinate with the Financial Aid Office.

 

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Internships and Ad-Hoc Externships

Umbrella or "Ad Hoc" Externships

A student interested in applying for an Ad-hoc Externship described below must complete the linked “Ad hoc Externship Learning Contract” with the input of the supervising faculty member and submit it, in electronic format, to the Registrar as early as possible in the semester preceding the intended externship to allow the Committee to fully consider the student's proposal.  The Registrar will then forward the completed form to the Chair of the Curriculum Committee and the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.  Additionally, a student should, at the conclusion of his or her externship, submit the following two additional forms, also in an electronic format to the Registrar:  the “Ad hoc Externship Field Supervisor Student Evaluation Form” and the “Confidential Student Evaluation of Placement Form.”

 

(a) Authority of Curriculum Committee. The Curriculum Committee has the authority to approve, on an ad hoc basis, government-related, government-sponsored, or non-profit externships not specifically provided for elsewhere in this chapter.  The Curriculum Committee also has the authority to approve externships with for-profit entities so long as the externship with the for-profit entity has been reviewed and recommended by the Academic Dean before being submitted to the Committee for approval.  It is the responsibility of the Curriculum Committee and the faculty supervisor to assure that each externship approved under this section meets the requirements of ABA Accreditation Standard 305 and any successor Standard. An externship does not include a clinical or judicial placement program established by the faculty. 

 

(b) Definitions:

  1. An externship is defined as experience in which a law student receives academic credit for legal work performed outside of the College of Law under the direct supervision of a field supervisor who is an attorney licensed to practice law. Externships referred to under this section do not include faculty approved clinical education programs.
  2. Absent unusual circumstances, which the student submitting a proposal must demonstrate, a field supervisor must be an attorney or judicial officer who directly supervises a law student’s legal work.
  3. A placement is defined as the location, office or organization in which an externship takes place.
  4. An eligible student is one who has completed two semesters of law school and is in good standing.
  5. A faculty supervisor is the faculty member or dean who has direct responsibility for the educational component of an externship.
  6. An eligible student may receive up to 10 semester hours of academic credit for a single approved externship, but, absent unusual circumstances, which the student must demonstrate, should not expect to receive more than 3 units in any fall or spring semester where the placement is in Arizona.   Students earning externship credit may not receive compensation for their work.   Absent approval from the Executive Committee, no law student may receive more than 10 semester hours of externship or internship credit, in the aggregate, while in law school.   Externships are graded on a pass/fail basis.  For each unit of credit awarded, the student should work a minimum of 50 externship hours.

 

(c) An Approved Externship Must Meet the Following Criteria: 

  1. Proposals for new externships shall be developed with a faculty member or dean who will be the faculty supervisor.  The faculty member should have an academic or curricular interest in the field placement.
  2. Each proposal shall be submitted to the Curriculum Committee for review and approval before the externship placement can be offered.
  3. A proposal for an externship must describe its educational objectives, the educational outcomes, the work to be performed by the student, and any prerequisites for the externship.  The educational objectives and outcomes must provide that substantially all of the extern’s work be legal work or work directly related to that, involving activities and work product that lawyers engage in and produce and that will contribute to the professional development and legal education of the extern.
  4. A proposal shall describe how issues of professional ethics will be addressed including confidentiality, professional liability and conflicts of interest.
  5. The field supervisor must be an attorney or judicial officer and must be able to devote the requisite time to supervision of the student.   The proposal shall describe the method for training and evaluating the field supervisor. If the externship is new, there must be a pre-placement orientation for the field supervisor in which the educational purposes of an externship and the role of a field supervisor are explained.
  6. A proposal for an externship must describe how the faculty and the field supervisors will maintain regular contact about the student’s experience.
  7. An externship must include opportunities for faculty- guided reflection and shall describe the mechanism for such student reflection.
  8. A proposal for an externship must describe how and how often the faculty supervisor and the student will communicate about the student’s experience.
  9. A proposal for an externship must clearly describe how the student’s academic performance will be evaluated.  Such evaluation must involve both the faculty and the field supervisors.
  10. Faculty oversight must include an on-site visit to the externship placement as required by ABA Standard 305.   For out-of-town placements, this requirement may be delegated upon approval of the Curriculum Committee.

 

(d) Burden to Obtain Approval

The burden is on the person proposing that a particular externship receive Law College academic credit to establish that the externship meets all the requirements of this section and that a particular law faculty member is qualified and willing to serve as the supervising faculty member.  The Curriculum Committee may require the proposer to furnish whatever documentation it considers necessary to make its decision.  The judgments and determinations of the Committee whether the proposed externship meets the requirements of this section are final and not appealable.

 

Legislative Internships

(a) General. The College of Law offers legislative internships in Washington, D.C., through which J.D. students may receive academic credit while working in the office of a United States Senator or Representative from Arizona. A student who serves as an intern during the fall or spring semester may receive 10 units of credit. If the service is during the summer, a student may receive (6) units of credit. The units of credit for a legislative internship are awarded only as Pass/Fail. No more than three legislative interns may serve in the office of a United States Senator and no more than one intern may serve in the office of a United States Representative at a one time. Students interested in such Internships should consult the Career Office.

 

(b) Educational Goals. The overall legal education goal to be achieved by a legislative internship is to give the law student an intense experience in, and realistic view of, law making and the legislative process on the federal level. Participation in this program should enable the law student to hone professional skills, particularly those regarding legal research and writing and negotiation, in the legislative setting. In addition, it should provide the law student with some exposure to the interaction of the legislative and executive branches of government and various federal agencies, as well as an opportunity to observe sessions of the United States Supreme Court.

 

(c) Advance Approval of Program. Before a student is permitted to enroll in a legislative internship program under this section, the particular legislative office must submit for approval a written proposal to the College of Law. In order for a law student to receive academic credit for participating in the program, the program must meet the requirements set out in subsection (e). The Career Office has the list of approved Internships and information on application procedures.

 

(d) Student Eligibility. To be eligible to participate in a legislative internship, a law student must have successfully completed the first year of law school and, at the time of application and upon commencing the internship, have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75. In addition, the student must obtain the permission of the Vice Dean.

 

(e) Requirements of Legislative Internship Programs. Before a particular legislative internship program under this section is approved by the College of Law, it must meet all of the following requirements:

     (1) Substantially all of the work required of a legislative intern must be legal work or work directly related to legal work.

     (2) The daily work of a legislative intern must be directly supervised by a person in the particular legislative office who is an attorney admitted to the practice of law in a state or the District of Columbia. The fact that the legislator is an attorney does not satisfy this requisite because the legislator is frequently not able to assume direct, daily supervision of the legislative intern.

     (3) A legislative intern may not receive compensation for services performed as an intern but may receive a stipend or other allowance to assist with living costs, as well as a tuition waiver.

     (4) The work of a legislative intern shall be reviewed on a regular basis over the period of the internship by a member of the College of Law faculty to ensure that substantially all of the intern's work is legal work or work directly related to it; that the legal educational goals are being met; and that the academic credit allowed is commensurate with the time and effort expended by, and the legal educational benefits to, the intern and to evaluate the duties and work product of the intern. This review may be accomplished by written correspondence, telephone, FAX, e-mail, or other types of communication. In addition, the Dean or his or her representative shall conduct, when possible, in-person meetings with the legislative intern in Washington, D.C., during the internship. A law faculty member assigned to this supervisory task shall receive one or two hours of teaching credit therefore, as determined by the Dean or Vice Dean. The responsible law faculty member shall submit an annual report concerning the particular internship program to the Curriculum Committee, which report shall contain such information as the Committee reasonably requests.

     (5) A substantial amount of the work performed by the legislative intern for academic credit must involve legal research and writing projects that result in a written work product susceptible of effective review and evaluation by the supervising law faculty member. Failure of the legislative office to provide adequate opportunity for the intern to engage in this type of work may result in the legislative office being disqualified from further participation in the program, effective at the end of the semester or summer session in which the disqualification occurs.

     (6) To receive a "Pass" and academic credit for the internship, the legislative intern must receive a "Satisfactory" performance rating from both the attorney directly supervising the intern in the particular legislative office and the supervising law faculty member. In addition, before a "Pass" and academic credit are awarded, the legislative intern shall submit a final, written report to the supervising law faculty member detailing the nature of the intern's work, the average number of hours worked per week, the average percentage of the total work week spent on legal work or work directly related to it, and any other matters required to be included in the report by the supervising law faculty member.

 

Courses Outside the Law College

Graduate Courses Outside the College of Law That Are Not Cross Listed

A non- joint degree law student who has completed one year of law studies and has a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 or above may take a maximum of 6 units of graduate courses outside the College of Law that are not cross-listed by the College of Law. The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs must determine in advance that each course to be counted toward the 6 credit hours is relevant to law study. Law school credit may be awarded only if a grade of “C” or higher is received (in a graded course) or “pass” (in a pass/fail course). Whether credit is awarded or not, the grade earned shall appear on the student’s College of Law transcript, but shall not be included in the student’s cumulative grade point average at the Law College.


Cross-Listed Courses Outside of the College of Law

A non-joint degree law student who has completed the first year of law study may enroll in graduate courses cross-listed by the College of Law. Grades earned in up to the first 9 units in these courses, not to exceed 3 courses, shall appear on the student’s College of Law transcript and shall be included in the student’s cumulative grade point average at the College of Law, provided that the student enrolls under the “LAW” prefix. Grades earned in any additional courses cross-listed by the College of Law shall appear on the student’s transcript but not be included in the student’s cumulative grade point average.


Maximum Credit

A law student other than those pursing a joint degree may receive, in total, a maximum of 14 units of credit towards his or her J.D. degree from graduate level courses located in departments outside the College of Law, whether those courses are cross-listed or not.


Joint Degree Law Students

Generally joint degree students already take 12 or more units as part of the non-law units that count towards the J.D. The limitations of 2-107(c) on the total law units that may be obtained from non-law school courses apply to joint degree students unless the joint degree agreement with another department provides for more non-law units, in which case the terms of the agreement govern. This limitation can be adjusted, but only in compelling circumstances, on a case-by-case basis with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and the Executive Committee.

 

 

Students Visiting at Another ABA Accredited Law School

Students must generally complete their all three years of study at the College of Law in order to receive a J.D. degree from the College of Law.  In rare cases and for good cause, the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs may permit a student who has completed all required courses and who is in good academic standing to take no more than 30 credits at another ABA accredited law school.  "Good cause" may include, for example, a spouse with a job in a city in close proximity to the law school at which the student wants to visit, or the serious illness of a close family member which would require the student's presence and care.  "Good cause" would not include, for example, placement/job search opportunities, or the desire to save money.  If the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs finds good cause and approves such a visit, the student must then obtain approval from the Vice Dean for Academic Affairs before enrolling in courses in order to confirm that credit for those courses may be transferred.  Transfer credit will be awarded only for graded courses where the student obtains a grade of "C" (or its equivalent) or higher.  Grades for transfer credits will not be included in the student's cumulative grade point average, and will not be considered "graded units" for purposes of satisfying the requirement that each student earn 37 graded units beyond the first year.  Students who visit away at another law school must still complete all required courses at the College of Law.

 

College of Law scholarship and/or grant aid may not be used, and will not be disbursed, during the period of time that a student is visiting at another ABA-approved law school.  Students who visit at another ABA-approved law school are eligible to receive financial aid in the form of loans as long as the host school agrees to enter into a consortium agreement with the College of Law.  In order to be eligible for financial aid as a visiting student, students are required to timely:

          1.  Receive permission from the College of Law Assistant Dean of Student Affairs to visit another ABA accredited law school;

          2.  Obtain an official letter of admission as a visiting student at another ABA accredited law school;

          3.  Work with the College's Financial Aid Office to complete the appropriated paperwork, including the consortium agreement.

 

Dual Degree Requirements and Programs

The College of Law faculty has approved a number of dual degree programs through which students may work toward and earn the J.D. degree and another, non-law degree, at the same time.  A link to the various dual degree programs is provided below. Only the programs designated as dual degrees have been approved by the College of Law Faculty. Dual degree students must take several unique steps to enroll, as well as remain aware of special considerations applying to dual degree students. It is very important that any student enrolled in a dual degree program plan his or her program with these in mind:

  1. Admission. Students who wish to enroll in a dual degree program (described below) must apply independently to both the College of Law and the other program (Philosophy, Psychology, Business Administration, Economics, Public Administration, American Indian Studies, Latin American Studies, Agricultural Economics (AREC), Finance, Public Health, or Women's Studies). (For convenience, the non-law programs will be referred to as "other programs" in the "Graduate College.")
  2. Advising. Professor Kathie Barnes is the academic advisor for dual degree students. She may be reached at (520) 621-5513 and at kathie.barnes@law.arizona.edu. Professor Robert Williams is the academic advisor for Dual Degree students working on the J.D.-M.A. in American Indian Studies. He may be reached at (520) 621-5622, or 621-7108; and williams@law.arizona.edu.
  3. Advising in Other Programs. Students must consult with an advisor in the non-law program to be sure all requirements in the other program are met.
  4. Notification of College of Law Registrar. Students enrolled in the College of Law who wish to take advantage of the College of Law dual degree program must inform the College of Law Registrar, immediately upon acceptance into the other program; failure to do so may jeopardize the student's ability to obtain the benefits of the dual degree program.
  5. First Year of Each Program. All dual degree students, like all other J.D. students, must complete the entire required first year law program, and must do so in one academic year. The typical dual degree program requires a student to participate full time in one program for one year, and full time in the other program for the next year; after that, students may enroll in courses in both programs simultaneously.
  6. Non-Law Units Applied to the J.D. Each dual degree program allows a student to apply from between 9 and 15 units of non-law courses (from the other program) to the J.D. (For ease of discussion, these will be referred to as "15 units"). To apply the 15 non-law units to the J.D., the non-law units must have been earned after the student has been admitted to the College of Law. Non-law units earned before a student has been admitted to the College of Law will not be applied to the J.D. In addition, the 15 units will not be applied to the J.D. unless the other degree is awarded before or in the same semester as the J.D. is awarded. It is critical that students make sure that they understand the number of units that may be “double-counted” to both degrees, and that they confirm with both the other department and the Graduate College that they are counting units accurately.
  7. Graded Law Unit Requirement. Dual degree candidates must satisfy all requirements of the J.D. Program. The current J.D. Program requires that all students, including dual degree candidates who entered the J.D. Program before fall of 2010, must earn 36 graded law units beyond the first year required law courses; students who entered the J.D. Program beginning with the fall of 2010 must earn 37 graded units beyond the first year. To meet this requirement, a dual degree student must plan carefully. Any units earned in the other program that are allowed to be applied to the J.D. do not count toward the graded unit requirement, even if those courses are taken for a grade in another department. If a dual degree student wishes to earn the J.D. before the other degree, only six (6) non-law units may be applied to the J.D.
  8. Calculating Law Grade Point Average. The candidate's grades in courses taken in the other program that are applied to the J.D. degree are shown on the Law College transcript, but the grades from the other program will not be included in the cumulative law grade point average. The candidate's grades in law courses that are applied to the other program's degree will be reported to the Graduate College on whatever basis is approved by the Graduate College and the College of Law. In any event, the College of Law will record a student's grades in law courses on the Law College transcript in the same manner as for all other law students and compute law course grades into the cumulative law grade point average.
  9. Enrollment in College of Law for Minimum of Five Semesters. Every dual degree student must enroll as a law student for at least five full semesters, and may enroll in the other program for the remaining semesters during which the student is working toward the two degrees. Students in any of the dual degree programs may take courses simultaneously in both programs after completing the first full year of law studies and the first full year of the other program. In any event, during any semester that a student is enrolled in a majority of law units, the student must be enrolled as a law student.
  10. Registration. Registration for dual degree students is particularly complex, and dual degree students should follow the instructions in this paragraph to insure as smooth a registration process as possible. For University registration purposes, students must formally elect each semester to register either in the College of Law as a law student or in the Graduate College as a graduate student. For example, if a dual degree student is enrolled as a law student in the fall semester, and plans to register as a graduate student for the following spring semester, the student must contact a representative in the graduate program to ensure that the "change" in registration from one college to the other is properly achieved. In other words, every dual degree student must contact the college he or she is changing into before the semester begins. Even if a dual degree student is not changing from one college to another in a given semester, he or she should contact the college Registrar before each registration period to ensure that registration goes smoothly. Note: After completing the full first year of each program, dual degree students may take courses from both law and the other program during any given semester; students must, however, be formally enrolled in either the College of Law or the other program, and cannot be formally enrolled in both programs.
  11. Graduation. To have the units from a non-law program applied to the J.D. degree, students must submit, within the first three weeks of the graduating semester, a list of courses the student wishes to have applied to the J.D. This list must be attached to a properly completed General Petition Form and submitted to the College of Law Registrar, (General Petition Forms are available from Ms. Donna Shafer, Room 150-D).
    Note: Any dual degree student who hopes to receive the J.D. before receiving the other degree will only be able to apply up to six (6) non-law units toward the J.D.
  12. Ranking. The following ranking procedures apply to any student who is considered a dual degree student by the College of Law:
    • Until a dual degree student begins to take law courses, there will be no class rank for the student in the College of Law.
    • Once a dual degree student begins to take law courses, the student will be ranked. For the first year, the student will be ranked in the first year law school class with whom the dual degree student completes his or her first year.
    • After completion of the first year, a dual degree student will be ranked in the current law school class that has completed the first year but has not completed the second year of law school (the second year class). Neither the starting class nor the expected graduating class of the dual degree student is relevant to the ranking of the student. The student will be ranked with the current second year class until the student completes law course units sufficient to render the student a third year student if he or she were not a dual degree student.
    • After the dual degree student completes law course units sufficient to advance the student to "third-year" status, the dual degree student will be ranked with the current third year class (those students who have completed two but not three years of law school). The student will be ranked with the current third year class until the student receives his or her J.D.
    • The unit breakdown is as follows:
      • Dual degree students shall be ranked at the time of their graduation from law school in the class with which they graduate.
      • Note that ranks will not be provided through email. Rather, ranks will only be provided pursuant to a written request, accompanied by a signature, or pursuant to a request made in person.
      • Order of the Coif. Not fewer than 66 (64 for students entering the J.D. program before fall 2010) graded units must be taken at the College of Law if a student wishes to be considered for membership in Order of the Coif.
  13. Financial Aid. A dual degree student who applies for financial aid will be considered for need-based scholarships from the College of Law only during those semesters in which the student is enrolled as a law student in the College of Law (and not enrolled as a graduate student in the other program) and meets all of the other criteria for receipt of need-based scholarship aid approved by the faculty. For additional information about Financial Aid, see the section on Financial Assistance in this handbook.

 

A description of the individual dual degree Programs can be found at

Dual Degrees.

 

 

Independent Study

Students may receive one to three units of credit, depending upon the magnitude of the project, for investigating and writing on special legal problems under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Prior to registration, the student must obtain written approval to register for Independent Study from the professor who will supervise the student's work. Students who intend to enroll for Independent Study should contact the college Registrar, to get an authorization form that must be signed by the sponsoring faculty member. Students may take up to 6 units of Independent Study during their law school careers. A student who either wishes to:  (a) take more than three (3) units of Independent Study in a single semester; (b) take more than three (3) units of Independent Study under the supervision of one faculty member; or (c) take a total of more than six (6) units of Independent Study, must petition the Executive Committee for permission, as well as obtain the approval of the appropriate faculty member.  Petitions should be submitted to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.  Independent Study is offered only on a Pass/Fail basis; no other grade is available.

 

Employment During Law School

The Faculty believes that part-time legal education lacks the depth required for adequate professional training. Thus, the College of Law does not offer a part-time program. During the first year, the College of Law strongly recommends that students devote themselves entirely to their studies and suspend any outside work. During the second and third years, students may choose to work on a part-time basis; however, the classroom educational experience and the preparation necessitated by the rigors of law coursework demand that academic work take primary importance in a student's pursuits.  However, the College of Law recognizes that certain financial situations may call for employment. Whatever the case, the American Bar Association Standards for Accreditation of Law Schools require that full-time students not be employed more than 20 (twenty) hours weekly (whether inside or outside the law school).  There can be no exception to this rule.

 

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IPLP LL.M. and S.J.D. -- Overview of Requirements

 

LLM Requirements

The LL.M. in Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy (IPLP) is a full-time residential academic program. LL.M. students are required to successfully complete 24 credit hours of classes over the course of one academic year in order to graduate. Three courses are required: Federal Indian Law I, International Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples, and the IPLP Colloquium. It is the responsibility of each LL.M. student to ensure that he or she meets these requirements. The LL.M. is available in three concentrations, in addition to the basic degree. Students wishing to pursue the Cultural Resources, Human Rights, or Critical Race Theory & Practice concentration should contact IPLP’s Associate Director to design an appropriate course of study. Students may switch between tracks of the LL.M. with written permission of IPLP’s Associate Director.

 

S.J.D. Requirements

S.J.D. candidates will spend one year in residency with the program, taking part in course work equal to a minimum of 24 credit hours. With the guidance of the candidate’s faculty advisor and IPLP’s Associate Director, each S.J.D. student is expected to enroll in courses related to his or her specialization. Coursework may include independent study credits, clinical courses, or any other courses approved by IPLP’s Associate Director. Students are required to enroll in the IPLP Colloquium during their year in residence. For the remaining credits, students are permitted to choose from law school courses and with prior written permission of IPLP’s Associate Director may also take up to one related graduate-level class each semester from another department on campus. Upon completion of the one-year residency requirement, candidates will typically spend one to two years completing their dissertation and related research. Students must fully complete all degree requirements no later than three years after the end of their year in residence. S.J.D. students must also comply with the IPLP Program's Dissertation procedures.

 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Unless excused by an official Leave of Absence, all LLM and SJD students are subject to the Continuous Enrollment Policy and must pay applicable tuition and fees in order to remain in the program. If the student fails to obtain a Leave of Absence or maintain continuous enrollment, he or she will be required to apply for re-admission, pay the Graduate College application fee, and pay all overdue tuition and fees, including cumulative late penalties. Tuition or registration waivers cannot be applied retroactively.

 

Changing Degree Programs

Students enrolled in IPLP’s LL.M. program who apply for admission to the S.J.D. prior to graduation may choose to forego receipt of the LL.M. and directly apply previously earned credits toward the S.J.D. Students interested in this option should consult with IPLP’s Associate Director.

 

Course Selection

The IPLP post-graduate programs are intended to be flexible in order to match the College of Law's diverse academic strengths with the particular interests of each L.LM. and S.J.D. student. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in IPLP courses to complete the credits required to earn the LL.M. and S.J.D. degrees, although IPLP’s Associate Director will work with each student to design a course of study that will help each student fulfill his or her career goals. Students are permitted to take other law school classes and with prior permission of IPLP’s Associate Director may also take up to one related graduate-level class each semester from another department. With the prior permission of IPLP’s Associate Director, students in the LLM and SJD programs may enroll in up to 6 units of 400-level or higher course work taken at The University of Arizona to fulfill degree requirements. These units must not have been used to fulfill requirements for an undergraduate degree. Students may not apply credits earned in classes below the 400 or level to the credits required for the LL.M. and/or S.J.D. degree. Only classes taken at the University of Arizona may be applied toward the credits required for the LL.M. and S.J.D. degree; no credits from courses taken at other law schools or universities may be used to fulfill the degree requirements. 

 

Grading

LL.M. and S.J.D. students are graded on a Superior/Pass/Fail basis.

 

Internships

A student in the LL.M. or S.J.D. program may also earn up to six credits for an internship. LL.M. and S.J.D. students wishing to obtain academic credit for an internship must arrange the internship and obtain prior approval of the internship. A copy of the conditions for approval may be obtained from IPLP's Associate Director. One of those requirements is that the student submit a proposal to the IPLP Associate Director demonstrating that all conditions for approval of the internship have been met. If the Associate Director approves the proposal, it will then be submitted to the College of Law Curriculum Committee. The Curriculum Committee shall make the final determination of whether the student may obtain academic credit for the internship and the number of academic credit hours to be awarded. A student interested in applying for an ad-hoc internship should submit a proposal as early as possible in the semester preceding the intended internship to allow the Committee to fully consider the student's proposed internship. Students must be prepared to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Curriculum Committee that arrangements for any required site visit and classroom component have been made.

 

Independent Study

Students may receive one to three units of credit, depending upon the magnitude of the project, per semester for investigating and writing on special legal problems under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Prior to registration, the student must obtain written approval to register for Independent Study from IPLP's Associate Director and from the professor who will supervise the student's work. Students who intend to enroll for Independent Study should contact the College Registrar, to get an authorization form that must be signed by the sponsoring faculty member. Students may apply up to 6 units of Independent Study toward the LL.M. or S.J.D. degree.

 

Employment During Law School

The educational experience involved in the LL.M. and S.J.D. programs, and the preparation necessitated by the rigors of law coursework, demand that academic work take primary importance in a student's pursuits. However, the College of Law recognizes that certain financial situations may call for employment. While outside employment is discouraged for students enrolled in the LL.M. and S.J.D. programs, students are permitted to engage in up to twenty hours of employment per week.

 

Fulfilling Requirements

Students are responsible for remaining informed about all policies and other information that bear directly on completing degree programs. If the student does not fulfill the requirements, the degree will not be granted.Students are responsible for checking, on a regular basis, their University of Arizona email accounts and information provided on the College of Law and University of Arizona websites.

 

 

ITBL LL.M. and S.J.D. -- Overview of Requirements

LL.M. Requirements

The LL.M. in International Trade and Business Law (ITBL) is a full-time residential academic program. LL.M. students are required to successfully complete 24 credit hours of classes, together with the one unit Introduction to American Law class over the course of one academic year in order to graduate. The following courses are required: Introduction to American Law; Legal Research and Writing; Business Organizations; International Trade Law; and either International Commercial Transactions or Comparative Commercial Law.  Each student must also sign up for three thesis units in the fall or spring semester, or in some combination of the two.  The thesis will be a work of independent research and writing on a topic of the candidate's choice, completed under the direction of a faculty advisor.  It is the responsibility of each LL.M. student to ensure that he or she meets these course and thesis requirements.

 

S.J.D. Requirements

S.J.D. candidates will spend one year in residency with the program, taking part in course work equal to a minimum of 24 credit hours. With the guidance of the candidate’s faculty advisor and the ITBL Program Director, each S.J.D. student is expected to enroll in courses related to his or her specialization. Coursework may include independent study credits, clinical courses, or any other courses approved by the Program Director. Students are permitted to choose from law school courses and with prior written permission may also take up to one related graduate-level class each semester from another department on campus. Upon completion of the one-year residency requirement, candidates will typically spend one to two years completing their dissertation and related research. Students must fully complete all degree requirements no later than three years after the end of their year in residence. S.J.D. students must also comply with the ITBL Program's Dissertation procedures.

 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Unless excused by an official Leave of Absence, all LLM and SJD students are subject to the Continuous Enrollment Policy and must pay applicable tuition and fees in order to remain in the program. If the student fails to obtain a Leave of Absence or maintain continuous enrollment, he or she will be required to apply for re-admission, pay the Graduate College application fee, and pay all overdue tuition and fees, including cumulative late penalties. Tuition or registration waivers cannot be applied retroactively.

 

 

Changing Degree Programs

Students enrolled in ITBL's s LL.M. program who apply for admission to the S.J.D. prior to graduation may choose to forego receipt of the LL.M. and directly apply previously earned credits toward the S.J.D. Students interested in this option should consult with the ITBL  Program Director.

 

Course Selection

The ITBL's post-graduate programs are intended to be flexible in order to match the College of Law's diverse academic strengths with the particular interests of each LL.M. and S.J.D. student. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in ITBL courses to complete the credits required to earn the LL.M. and S.J.D. degrees, although the program director will work with each student to design a course of study that will help each student fulfill his or her career goals. Students are permitted to take other law school classes and with prior permission of the program director may also take up to one related graduate-level class each semester from another department.

 

Grading

LL.M. and S.J.D. students are graded on a Superior/Pass/Fail basis.

 

Fulfilling Requirements

Students are responsible for remaining informed about all policies and other information that bear directly on completing degree programs. If the student does not fulfill the requirements, the degree will not be granted.Students are responsible for checking, on a regular basis, their University of Arizona email accounts and information provided on the College of Law and University of Arizona websites.

 

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Examination Procedures and Reporting of Grades

Examination Procedures

Individual examination numbers are distributed each semester through UA Law Forums accessible through the College of Law website. New examination numbers are distributed each semester. After logging onto Forums, go to "Profile." Your exam number will be displayed there with other information such as your class rank (after completion of your first year) and the list of courses you are taking in the current semester. These examination numbers are randomly generated and replaced each semester. The purpose of this process is to insure anonymity during grading.

 

On examination day, you should report to the room assigned for your exam at least thirty(30) minutes before your examination is scheduled to begin. You must furnish your own examination bluebooks or laptops unless you have made arrangements to use a law school computer.  You should check the IT webpage on the law school website to see complete instructions for taking examinations by computer. You should take only your bluebooks or laptops and necessary writing instruments into the examination room unless otherwise instructed.

 

Examinations may be taken only in the rooms specified on the examination instruction sheet or in the examination computer room. Students are not allowed to take examinations in the library or any other location. If for any reason you must leave a classroom during an examination, the bluebooks and all examination materials must remain in the classroom. ALL STUDENTS ARE INDIVIDUALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR KNOWING THE CORRECT TIME AS GOVERNED BY THE ROOM CLOCK AND FOR STOPPING WHEN TIME IS UP. Where space permits, students are to take alternate seats in the examination rooms. Before writing, all students must place their examination number, the course name, and the examining instructor’s name on their bluebooks.


When the allotted time expires, you must immediately stop writing. Each student is responsible for keeping track of time. You may not make deletions or corrections after the time has expired. Anyone who does so is in violation of the Honor Code. Upon expiration of the examination time, hand in your examination questions and answers. If you finish before the expiration of the allotted examination period, you may hand in your examination questions and answers and leave quietly so as not to disturb those still taking the examination.  Please refrain from discussing the examination in or around the classroom area before the allotted time has expired, even though you may have finished the examination and turned in your examination answers. Even after time has expired, if anyone is still uploading or handing in their examination questions and answers, everyone should refrain from discussion. The examination does not officially end until all students have handed in their examination answers. ONCE THE EXAM HAS ENDED STUDENTS MUST REFRAIN FROM ANY DISCUSSION WITH THE PROFESSOR ABOUT THE EXAM UNTIL AFTER GRADES HAVE BEEN TURNED IN TO THE REGISTRAR.

 

Examination Schedule

Examination schedules are released prior to registration each semester or summer session. Any changes to the examination schedule are also posted on the College of Law website.

 

Use of Computers, Typewriters, and Other Devices to Write or Calculate Answers on Examinations

Students may write examinations in longhand, by typewriter, or, with instructor permission, by computer, subject to the following rules:

  • If an examination is written in longhand, ink should be used and answers should be written on only one side of each page, unless the professor specifies otherwise. Students generally are required to provide their own examination blue books, available for purchase at the University Bookstore.
  • If an examination is written with the use of a typewriter, the typewriter may include an automatic self-correcting key, but shall not include a device that contains any memory or programming feature.
  • If an examination is written with the use of a computer, students must use software selected by the College of Law, which for the duration of the examination disables a computer's programs except desktop word processing, and must perform in a timely manner all necessary steps for obtaining, downloading, and becoming familiar with the the software in a timely manner. Students who do not own their own laptop computers may use College of Law computers, on an as-available basis, provided they comply in a timely manner with the College's procedures governing requests for using College of Law computers and, before the exam, undertake the necessary steps to become familiar with the required software.
  • Unless an instructor specifies otherwise, the use of mechanical or electronic calculating devices are permitted to calculate answers on examinations, but models with programming capacity are not permitted.
  • Special exceptions for students with disabilities may be made upon petition to the Executive Committee through Dr. Willie Jordan-Curtis.

 

Examination Time Policy

Instructors may schedule examinations other than the final exam, but should obtain the approval of the Vice Dean before doing so.


Change of Final Examination Time

An instructor may not change the time for which his or her final examination is scheduled without the approval of the Vice Dean. A student may not change the time of his or her final examination without the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs or Executive Committee, which may only be granted in extraordinary circumstances. For purposes of this section, three examinations in three consecutive calendar days does not constitute "extraordinary circumstances." A student's petition to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs or Executive Committee to change an examination time may not be acted upon until the instructor involved has been informed about the petition and had an opportunity to confer with the Assistant Dean or appear before the Committee.

 

Conflicting Examination Schedule

If a student has more than one examination scheduled at the same time, or more than one examination on any calendar day, a petition setting forth these facts will be granted. Examinations on successive days shall not be sufficient ground for a change of schedule. No accommodation will be made for personal inconvenience, travel complications or similar matters. Any examination which is deferred from its scheduled date must be taken on the next open date in the student's final examination schedule. All deferred and rescheduled examinations must be taken no later than the end of the relevant semester's (or summer session) examination period. Any time a student has received a deferral to take an examination and fails to complete that examination by the end of the relevant semester's (or summer session term's) examination period, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs shall refer the matter to the Executive Committee for its determination. The Executive Committee may take whatever action it deems appropriate. If the Executive Committee determines that the examination should have been taken within the examination period at the time the examination was scheduled for that student, the student shall receive a "W" in that course.

 

Illness or Other Emergency

Students having an illness which is sufficiently serious to warrant deferring an examination must bring to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs a written note from a doctor which documents the illness before the examination time will be changed. Students who are unable to report for a final examination due to illness or other emergency circumstances, should contact the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs or, in her absence, the College of Law Registrar, or the Chair of the Executive Committee, prior to the beginning of the examination. A student who has an examination time changed because of illness or other emergency must take that examination at the earliest practicable time.

 

Documented Disabilities

Students with documented disabilities who will require special examination accommodations should first contact the University Disability Resource Center and then make the necessary arrangements with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. Notwithstanding reasonable examination accommodations, all examinations must be taken on the date of the regularly scheduled examination. Any deferred or rescheduled examination must be taken no later than the last day of the relevant semester's (or summer session's) examination period. Any time a student has received a deferral to take an examination and fails to complete the examination by the end of the relevant semester's (or summer session's) examination period, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs shall refer the matter to the Executive Committee for its determination. The Executive Committee may take whatever action it deems appropriate.  If the Executive Committee determines that the examination should have been taken within the examination period at the time the examination was scheduled for that student, the student shall receive a "W" in that course.

 

Failure To Take or Complete Examination

  • Failure to Take Examination. A grade of "E" shall be awarded to a student who fails to take an examination unless the Executive Committee is convinced that extraordinary circumstances, which could not have been communicated to the Executive Committee, its Chair, or the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs prior to the scheduled exam, prevented the student from taking the exam. The instructor for the course involved does not have any discretion to award a grade under the circumstances covered by this rule. If a prior request to be excused from taking an examination is refused by the Chair of the Executive Committee or the Assistant Dean, and the student still elects not to take the examination, he or she may appeal the refusal to the full Executive Committee on the ground that the requisite extraordinary circumstances did exist. If the student elects to take the examination, however, there shall be no right to appeal the refusal to the Executive Committee in order to obtain relief from the grade received.
  • Failure to Complete Examination. If a student feels that he or she cannot complete an examination after the examination has started, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, after consultation with the instructor whose examination is being given, has complete discretion to grant relief in the event of extraordinary circumstances or to deny relief if the Assistant Dean determines that such circumstances do not exist. There is no right to appeal the decision of the Assistant Dean.

 

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Grading System

 

Grade Distribution Procedure

  • Grade Reporting and Posting
    • Reporting Grades. Grades for a course involving a final examination shall be reported to the Registrar's Office no later than three weeks after the examination is completed unless other arrangements are made with the Vice Dean. Grades for courses not involving a final examination shall be reported to the Registrar's office no later than three weeks after the end of the official final examination period.
    • Time for Posting Grades. Grades are posted as soon as possible after being finalized and reported to the Registrar's Office. In no event shall grades be posted sooner than the end of the official final examination period. Generally, grades are posted beginning 2 to 3 weeks after the end of the official final examination period.
    • Public Posting of Grades Prohibited. Posting of student grades is limited to methods that permit students to access their grades on an individual basis only. It is a violation of the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to publicly post student grades that are identified by a student's name or some type of number, including, for example, a student's institutional identification or examination number or the last four digits of a student's social security number, without first obtaining the student's written permission to do so.

 

Grading Procedures

  • Anonymous Grading Procedure. The following procedures for identifying and grading examinations at the College of Law shall be observed:
    • Each law student is assigned an individual examination number before each final examination period, accessible on the individual student's College of Law Forum site.
    • Each student shall use only the examination number assigned to the student to identify his or her final examination and shall not in any other manner reveal his or her identity to the instructor.
    • All examination papers shall be read, graded, and identified by the instructor solely through the use of student examination numbers.
    • In awarding grades inclusion of such factors as class preparation, performance on quizzes, outside written work, or class participation must be accomplished in a manner to ensure student anonymity. Faculty members who wish to award credit in the grading process for class participation should consult with the College of Law Registrar to devise a method of anonymous grade adjustment. For example, an instructor may submit raw examination scores assigned by student examination numbers to the Registrar along with a list of names of students who are to receive extra credit, expressed in points, for class participation. The Registrar may then add the points to the students' raw examination scores and return the list of all scores by examination number to the instructor, who then may calculate and award the final grades.
    • Any adjustment of grades because of class participation or other basis must be done before applying the mandatory curve or the maximum 3.5 mean grade point average requirement, whichever is applicable.
    • Once the instructor has submitted final grades, the Registrar shall furnish to the instructor a list of the students in the class that shows the grades awarded to the students by names and examination numbers.

 

Review of performance in Course.Each faculty member shall discuss with and disclose to each individual student, upon request, the factors which enter into the determination of the student's final grade. Such discussions should be made within a reasonable time after the release of grades following the close of each semester. A faculty member is not required to review examination papers in detail with individual students, but should be available for a private discussion with a student who requests a review of the student’s performance in the course. If a faculty member expects to be away from the College of Law during the period immediately following the release of grades, and in cases where, due to other commitments, it is inconvenient or impossible for a period of time for a faculty member to discuss grades with students, the faculty member shall leave with the Faculty Services office the students' examination papers, with detailed comments or a copy of model answers or the best student answers, and an explanation of the process by which the faculty member arrived at the students' final grades in the course. This data will be made available to inquiring students. Students should not attempt to discuss an examination with a professor until after the grades for the class are posted.

 

The grading policy for second year students taking first year courses is as follows: (a) all exams are graded anonymously as a group; (b) the curve is established on the basis on this anonymous grading; (c) second year students then are identified by the Registrar and are taken out of the curve; (d) the curve is adjusted for first year students only; and (e) the second year students receive the grade initially awarded to them, although the student is still entitled to any increase in grade which was made while the grading process was still anonymous.


Change of Grade.A final grade may be changed by an instructor only if there has been an error in computation or for an equally justifiable reason. A grade may not be changed as the result of re-examination. The grade change must be made on a grade-change form and approved by the Vice Dean or his or her representative and the Registrar.

Grade Grievance Procedure

(a) Consultation with Faculty Member.A student who wishes to appeal a grade must first discuss the grade with the faculty member who assigned the grade. Upon request, the instructor shall review the matter with the student, explain the grading procedure, and state the manner in which he or she arrived at the grade. Except for correcting a mathematical or transcription error in grading, however, the faculty member is not authorized to change the grade assigned. The consultation requirement of this paragraph may be waived by the Vice Dean if, for example, the faculty member is unavailable for or refuses the consultation request.

 

(b) Grievance.If consultation with the instructor who assigned the grade does not resolve the matter, the student may thereafter appeal his or her grade by written petition to the Vice Dean. An appeal shall be lodged within 60 days of the start of the next regular term following the term to which the appeal relates or 60 days after the grade is first posted, whichever occurs later. (Thus appeal of a Spring or Summer semester grade must be filed no later than 60 days after the date of the first day of classes of the following Fall semester unless the grade appealed was posted after the first day of Fall classes, while appeal of a Fall Semester grade must be filed either 60 days from the start of the Spring semester or 60 days from the date the grade was posted, whichever is later.) The time requirements of this paragraph may be waived if the student demonstrates to the Vice Dean extraordinary circumstances warranting a waiver.

 

(1)The grade appeal petition must recite with particularity the specific grounds  for the appeal. Grade appeals must be based on actions by the faculty member in the grading process. Events that happen during the teaching of the course and administration of exams, by themselves, cannot constitute grounds for a grade appeal.

 

(a) For a course not graded anonymously, the only grounds for appeal are a grade alleged either: (i) to be affected by the faculty member’s personal bias or animus toward the appealing student, or (ii) to have been assigned by the faculty member in an arbitrary and capricious manner.

 

(b)For a course graded anonymously, the only grounds for appeal is a grade alleged to have been assigned by the faculty member in an arbitrary and capricious manner. A course designed to be graded anonymously will be treated as an anonymously graded course unless the student can establish by a preponderance of the evidence that anonymity was compromised such that the course should be treated as not anonymously graded.

 

(2) The Vice Dean may dismiss any appeal which, after consideration of the petition, the Vice Dean determines to be unfounded.

 

(3)If the Vice Dean finds that the petition states a ground for appeal, the Vice Dean shall, prior to taking any action, first discuss the matter with the faculty member involved. Thereafter, the Vice Dean may refer the appeal to a committee comprised of three members of the faculty of the Vice Dean's choosing or take whatever other action the Vice Dean deems appropriate, including rendering a decision on his or her own.The evidentiary burden concerning all factual allegations supporting a ground for appeal shall be on the student, and evidence must meet the clear and convincing evidence standard. In the absence of substantial independent evidence of personal bias or animus, review on appeal shall be limited to the examination or paper of the appealing student and the grade assigned to it plus information, if relevant, concerning the instructor's grading process, without consideration of any other examination or paper, and shall not involve an inquiry into the involved faculty member’s academic judgment concerning the academic quality of the work in question or otherwise discharging his or her responsibility for assigning grades.

 

(4)The Vice Dean shall notify both the appealing student and the faculty member involved of the final decision in writing.

 

(c)Student Appeal.If the student remains dissatisfied with the outcome after having followed the procedures herein set forth, the student may file a written appeal to the Dean.The appeal to the Dean must be submitted within seven days of receiving the notice of the final decision from the Vice Dean. The appeal must indicate with specificity the reasons why the final decision reached by the Vice Dean or faculty committee appointed by the Vice Dean was not satisfactory.

 

(1) Based on a review of the written appeal, the Dean will decide whether or not to hear the appeal.If the Dean decides that there are not sufficient grounds for review, the Dean will notify the student by letter. If the Dean decides that there are sufficient grounds for review, the Dean will conduct a hearing at which the Dean will interview both the student and the involved faculty member. The Dean may choose to interview other involved persons as well.

 

(2)After the Dean has conducted a hearing, the Dean shall promptly issue a final decision, with copies to the student and the faculty member involved.

 

d) Faculty Appeal. If a faculty member whose grade has been appealed believes that his or her academic freedom or academic responsibilities have been affected by any administrative ruling in the process, the faculty member may appeal or grieve in accordance with the applicable procedures set forth in the University Handbook on Appointed Personnel or the ABOR Policy Manual. That appeal must be made within ten days of the action provoking it. No grade may be finally changed until the faculty member’s appeal process has been completed.

 

Grading System

University and College Grading System

 

 (a) Grades. The College of Law employs a letter grading system, including plus and minus 
grades, in which “A” means excellent, “B” means good, “C” means fair, “D” means poor, 
and “E” means failure. In addition, “P” means pass, “F” means fail, “I” means incomplete, and “W”  means withdrawal. The letter grades have the following numerical equivalents: 

 

A = 4.00 
A- = 3.67 
B+ = 3.33 
B = 3.00 
B- = 2.67 
C+ = 2.33 
C = 2.00 
C- = 1.67 
D+ = 1.33 
D = 1.00 
D- = .67 
E = 0.00 

 

(b) Limitations on Mandatory Plus and Minus Grades. Under the mandatory grading 
system described in subsection (a): (1) a grade of A+, E+, or E- may not be awarded; and 

 

(2) for purposes of raising grades on the basis of class participation, an instructor's 
discretion is limited to raising a grade by one grade increment only. For example, a B- may be raised  only to a B and a B+ only to an A-. 

 

 (c) Incomplete Work. A grade of “I” may be awarded if a student has not completed all the 
course work required for a grade. The grade of “I” may not be awarded if the student is expected to  repeat the course; in such case, a grade of “E” shall be awarded. A grade of I may not be used in the  calculation of grade point averages, but shall be automatically changed to a final grade of “E” unless  removed by a final grade within one year after the “I “is given. A student who receives a grade of “I”  in a course may not audit the course before removing the incomplete. 

 

(d) Grades Upon Withdrawal. Subject to Section 2-104 (b), a student may drop and/or add courses by following instructions and adhering to deadlines in the appropriate Schedule of Classes and Registration Dates and Deadlines link located on the University Registrar's website each semester. Course withdrawals filed by the end of the fourth week of classes during the fall and spring  semesters result in cancellation of registration in the course. For course withdrawals filed after the  end of the fourth week of classes, a grade of “W” will be awarded to a student who is passing at the  time of withdrawal; whereas a grade of “E” or “F” may be awarded if the student is not passing at  the time of withdrawal. The grade awarded shall be shown on the student's permanent record. 

 

CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES

Cumulative grade point averages shall  be computed by multiplying the unit value of each course completed or attempted by a student by the  number equivalent of the grade received in the course and dividing the sum of these products by the  sum of the units completed or attempted. Only the grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D, D- and  E have number equivalents, which are specified in Section 2-201(a). Other grades, such as P, F, I,  and W have no number equivalents and may not be used in calculating cumulative grade point  averages. Except as otherwise provided in Section 2-107(b), the cumulative grade point average may  be based only on work attempted within the College of Law. 

 

CHANGE OF GRADE

A final grade may be changed by an instructor only if there  has been an error in computation or for an equally justifiable reason. A grade may not be changed as  the result of re-examination. The grade change must be made on a grade-change form and approved  by the Vice Dean or his or her representative and the Registrar. 

 

 

Class Grade Distributions (Grade Curve), Dean's List, Class Ranks, Graduation with Honors, and Order of Coif

 

CLASS GRADE DISTRIBUTIONS

The following rules apply with respect to class  grade distributions at the Law College: 

 

 (1) Mandatory Curve for First Year Classes. Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (2) and (3), grades must be distributed in the following manner: 15 percent A's, 15 percent A-'s, 25 percent B+'s, 25 percent B's, 10 percent B-'s, and 10 percent C+'s or lower. 

 

(2) Permitted Deviations From Mandatory Curve for First Year Classes. Faculty may not deviate more than plus or minus 2.5 percent from the mandatory grade curve prescribed in  paragraph (1), except in extraordinary circumstances. Additionally, the combined number of A's  and A-'s awarded as prescribed in paragraph (1) must be 30 percent of the total grades awarded, plus  or minus 2.5 percent, and the combined number of B+'s, B's, and B-'s awarded as prescribed in  paragraph (1) must be 60 percent of the total grades awarded, plus or minus 2.5 percent. That is, for  example, with regard to students in a class subject to the curve, the grade of A may not be awarded  to more than 17.5 percent or less than 12.5 percent of the students; the grade of A- may not be  awarded to more than 17.5 percent or less than 12.5 percent of the students; and the grades of A and  A- combined may not be awarded to more than 32.5 percent or less than 27.5 percent of the students.  Faculty who believe that extraordinary circumstances justify a deviation of more than 2.5 percent for  a particular class may seek permission to do so in writing, explicitly stating the reasons for the  request, from the Academic Dean. Unless the grades are accompanied by written approval signed by  the Academic Dean, the Registrar may not record grades that deviate from the mandatory grade  curve by more than 2.5 percent.

 

 (3) First-Year Classes Excepted from the Mandatory Curve. Fall semester Legal Process Analysis, and Writing classes shall be graded on a pass/fail basis. Spring semester Legal Process, Analysis, and Writing classes, the year-long first-year legal research class, and upper-level  courses offered to first-year students as electives shall be graded as prescribed in paragraph (4). 

 

(4) Upper Level Classes. For all upper-level classes, other than substantial paper seminars, and other courses excepted by these bylaws or by a duly-passed faculty resolution, the target mean grade point average shall be 3.35. If the mean falls above or below the target mean, it  shall in no event be greater than 3.5 or less than 3.2. Faculty may not deviate from this requirement, except in extraordinary circumstances. Faculty who believe that extraordinary circumstances justify  a mean grade point average that falls outside the prescribed range may seek permission to do so in  writing, explicitly stating the reasons for the request, from the Academic Dean. Unless the grades are  accompanied by written approval signed by the Academic Dean, the Registrar may not record grades  that deviate from the grade point average prescribed in this paragraph. 

 

(5) Grades of D+, D, D- and E Under Mandatory Curve. For purposes of  evaluating work in assigning grades under the mandatory curve prescribed under paragraph (1), the  grades of D+, D, and D- reflect varying degrees of unsatisfactory work. A grade of "E" reflects work  that is so unsatisfactory as not to merit credit for the course. 

 

(6) Substantial Paper Seminars. There is no grade curve or required mean grade 
point average for substantial paper seminars or in house clinics.

 

 

Dean's List

A student who enrolls for and completes a minimum of 10 graded units of law credit in any semester and who receives at least a 3.30 average for that semester shall be placed on the Dean’s List.

 

Class Ranking

  1. First-Year Class. The first-year class shall not be ranked until the end of the academic year, except as is necessary to enable the Arizona Law Review or Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law to choose candidates on the basis of grade point averages.
  2. Second- and Third-Year Classes. The second- and third-year classes shall be ranked at the end of each semester. No new rankings are calculated following summer school.

 

    Dual Degree Students; Procedure for Ranking

        The following procedures for class rankings shall apply to any student who is    considered a dual degree student by the College of Law:

  1. First-Year Rank. Only after a dual degree student begins to take law courses, shall the student be ranked. For purposes of a first-year class rank, a dual degree student shall be ranked in the first-year law school class with whom the student completes her or his first year.
  2. Second-Year Rank. After completing the first year, a dual degree student shall be ranked with the Law College class that is currently completing its second year and with whom the student is taking courses. The student shall be ranked with that class until the student has completed a sufficient amount of course or other work to be classified as a third-year student.
  3. Third-Year Rank. Once a dual degree student is classified as a third-year student, the student shall be ranked with the College class that is currently completing its third year and with whom the student is taking courses. The student shall be ranked with that class until the student graduates, at which time the student shall be ranked with the other graduates in the class.

 

Graduation with Honors

J.D. graduates of the College of Law that rank within the highest 25 percent of the grade point averages for those in a graduation class may be awarded degrees with honors. No more than 25 percent of the total number of graduates in a class may graduate with honors. In the event that two or more graduates may have identical grade point averages that produce ties in rankings, fewer than 25 percent of those in the graduating class may be awarded degrees with honors.

 

1. Summa Cum Laude

Highest Distinction Top 7% of the class
2. Magna Cum Laude High Distinction Next 7% of the class
3. Cum Laude Distinction Next 11% of the class

 

As outlined above, those who rank within the highest seven percent are eligible to receive the honor of Summa Cum Laude - Highest Distinction; those who rank within the next highest seven percent are eligible to receive the honor of Magna Cum Laude - High Distinction; and those who rank within the next 11 percent are eligible to receive the honor of Cum Laude - Distinction.

 

Order of the Coif

The College of Law is one of a select number of law schools holding membership in this prestigious national order. The faculty of the College of Law, in its discretion, awards this honor to J.D. graduates who are within the top 10% of the graduating class and who have completed at least 75% of their law studies in graded College of Law units.


A student admitted as a transfer student at the College of Law is eligible for consideration to membership in the Order of the Coif. However, such transfer students must meet two specific requirements:

  • A transfer student must take, in his or her second and third years here, at least 75% of his or her course units in graded courses.
  • A transfer student's class ranking here, based on his or her GPA for the second and third years, will be compared with the University of Arizona College of Law students' class ranking, based on those students' GPA's for their second and third years here. Only if a transfer student is in the top 10% of the class, based on this computation, is that student eligible for Coif membership.

 

 

 

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Registration

 

Procedures for J.D. Registration

First-year students are assigned to both courses and instructors for all classes in the first year. For registration for the spring semester of the first year, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs distributes, via email at your University email address, instructions to each first-year student on how to register via the University on-line registration system.

Registration procedures for second and third year students will be distributed at the College of Law in late October or November, for the following spring semester and in late March or April, for the following fall semester.

 

Procedures for LL.M. and S.J.D. Registration

Prior to registration, LL.M. and S.J.D. students should review the schedule of classes, determine their preferences, and e-mail them to their Program Director (either IPLP or ITBL). The Program Director will review the student’s preferences, contact the student with any questions or suggestions, and provide the student with information about the next steps in the registration process. Please note that students will not be allowed to register until they provide proof of immunization. Students will also not be allowed to register until the Program Director approves the student’s schedule.

 

Policy

Students must be enrolled by the 7th day of classes, and no late registrations will be accepted after the 21st day of class. Registration is not complete until registration fees, and tuition, if appropriate, are paid. Failure to pay by the 21st day will result in the student not being allowed to enroll, even if the student has been attending classes. Late registration after this date will not be accepted unless the student submits a written appeal to the Registrar and can document extenuating circumstances such as medical problems (physically incapacitated and not able to be present), legal problems, or some other academic commitment which precluded enrolling prior to the 21st day.

 

Legal Residency

A student classified as a nonresident who desires to obtain legal residency for tuition purposes must present proof of his or her manifested intention to become an Arizona resident. For information about the procedure to be followed, contact the Domicile Classification Officer in the Modern Languages building, room 347, prior to registration at 621-3636.

 

Release of Information

The University and the College of Law comply with all provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) dealing with the release of education records.  ANY STUDENT WHO DOES NOT WISH TO HAVE DIRECTORY INFORMATION MADE PUBLIC, SHOULD PERSONALLY NOTIFY THE COLLEGE OF LAW REGISTRAR'S OFFICE AND THE MAIN CAMPUS REGISTRAR'S OFFICE.

 

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Procedure for Degree Candidacy

Candidates for the J.D., LL.M., and the S.J.D. degree are required to file a degree application form, which may be obtained from the Registrar of the College of Law. A $35 fee will be billed to your student account. Degree applications must be submitted to the College's Registrar, Janice Marotta, no later than the 1st week of school of the graduating semester. Graduation may occur in May, August, or December of each year. (Degree applications must be filed in August for December graduation, in January for May graduation, and in June for August graduation. Late degree applications may result in a delay in awarding of degree until the next graduation.)

 

Updated units and grades are recorded at the end of each semester. This information is available to the student upon request and on UAccess Student http://uaccess.arizona.edu/ .

 

Clearance of indebtedness to the University is required before a student will be certified for a degree. Student indebtedness records are maintained by the Accounts Receivable Section of the Business Affairs Office.

 

A certificate of completion of law studies is sent to the State Bar of Arizona by the Dean of the College of Law after grades have been recorded at the end of the graduating semester.

 

 

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Leaves of Absence, Probation, &       Disqualification

 

J.D. Policies

 

LL.M./S.J.D. Policies

 

 

 

 

J.D. Policies

Approved Leaves of Absence From the College of Law.

  • Leaves During First Year. A first-year student may petition for a leave of absence before completion of the first year. The petition must be filed with the College of Law Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and must include the reasons for the leave. To receive the leave, the student must show that there is an extraordinary need to delay his or her legal education. The Executive Committee shall decide whether to grant the petition.
  • Leaves During Second or Third Years. A second- or third-year student who is not subject to disqualification may file a petition with the College of Law Assistant Dean for Student Affairs seeking permission to take a one semester or one year leave of absence. The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs may grant such petition if the student shows good cause for the leave. Petitions for a leave of absence of longer than one year shall be decided by the College of Law Executive Committee. Such requests shall be granted only upon a showing of an extraordinary need to delay legal education for longer than one year.
  • Conditions for Leave During Course of Semester. If a leave of absence is granted either by the College of Law Assistant Dean for Student Affairs or the Executive Committee during the course of a semester, the student must file a formal request to withdraw from the University and meet all University requirements for withdrawal. Failure to file a formal withdrawal from the University by the last day of classes shall result in a grade of E being awarded for each of the courses in which the student is enrolled.
  • Withdrawal From University. Withdrawal from the University of Arizona must be arranged through the Office of the University Dean of Students. The effective date of withdrawal shall be the date the formal application is filed in the Office of the University Dean of Students, located on the main floor of the Old Main Building. Formal withdrawal from the University of Arizona is required. If a leave of absence is granted either by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (College of Law), or by the Executive Committee (College of Law) during the course of a semester, the student must additionally file a formal complete withdrawal with the University Dean of Students' Office located in the Old Main Building. A student may not withdraw from the University after the last day of classes unless approved by the College of Law Executive Committee. The Executive Committee may not approve such requests unless the student demonstrates that there are extraordinary circumstances that would justify such action.
  • Suspension and Dismissal. All students enrolled in the College of Law are subject to University rules and regulations regarding student behavior and reprehensible conduct. Failure to comply with these or any other University rules and regulations may result in a student’s suspension or dismissal from a course or from the University at any time. Such action shall be posted on the student’s academic record. Students suspended from the University are denied student privileges during the period of suspension; may not register for correspondence work except with permission of the dean of the college in which they were previously registered; and may not enroll for continuing education courses or establish credit by examination during the period of suspension.
  • Medical Withdrawal. A student may withdraw from the University for medical reasons. However, to be eligible for any refund of fees paid, the student must obtain approval for a medical withdrawal from the University Health Center and otherwise meet University requirements for fee refunds. Students who withdraw from the University for medical reasons must have their readmittance approved by the University Health Center.

 

Withdrawal Without Law College Approval; Failure to Request Extension of Leave

  • A student must re-enroll in the Law College at the beginning of the first semester, excluding summers, immediately following the expiration of the period of an approved leave of absence. A student who fails to do so or otherwise withdraws from the College without the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs or Executive Committee and later wishes to re-enroll in the College of Law shall file a petition for readmission with the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee may act on the petition or, in appropriate circumstances, refer it to the Admissions Committee for action. Petitions for readmission must be filed no later than one month prior to the beginning of the semester for which re enrollment is requested. For purposes of this section, a student withdraws from the College of Law if the student formally withdraws from the University as described above (Approved Leaves of Absence from the College of Law), or fails to continuously enroll in the College for the minimum course load required each semester, excluding summers, after beginning her or his matriculation in the College until the requirements for graduation are completed.

 

 

Probation with Conditions and Disqualification by Executive Committee Action

  • Probation; Definition of Semester. A student whose cumulative grade point average is less than 2.0, but not less than 1.629, at the end of the first year or any semester thereafter shall be placed on probation with conditions.
  • Conditions. A student who is on probation with conditions shall:
    • obtain approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs of a course schedule that consists of at least 13 units, unless the student qualifies for a reduced load under the James E. Rogers College of Law By-Laws (College By-Laws), in which case the rules regarding reduced course loads govern the number of required units;
    • repeat, during the second-year of law studies, any first-year course in which the student receives a grade of E;
    • not enroll in any course on a Pass-Fail basis, except for the first semester, first-year Legal Process, Analysis and Writing Practice Lab courses as required under the Section 2-213(c)(1);
    • not take an Incomplete or withdraw from any course without the approval of the Executive Committee;
    • achieve a semester grade point average of at least 2.0 for the next semester in which the student is enrolled and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 by the end of the subsequent semester in which the student is enrolled; and
    • meet such other reasonable conditions as the Executive Committee may impose on the student as a requirement for continuing in law school.
  • Failure of a student on probation with conditions to satisfy any one or more conditions imposed above shall subject the student to disqualification under Section 2-212.

 

Automatic Disqualification

  • First-Year Students. A student who fails to achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 1.629 at the end of the first year or any semester thereafter is disqualified from the College of Law.
  • Students on Probation with Conditions. A student on probation with conditions who fails to achieve any grade point average specifically required as a condition of probation for any semester or other period is disqualified from the College of Law under Section 2-111(b)(5).

Readmission

  • Petition for Readmission. Except as otherwise provided in Section 2-214, a disqualified student may petition the Executive Committee for readmission. The petition shall be filed with the Chair of the Executive Committee no later than two weeks prior to the semester for which readmission is sought. A student may appear before the Executive Committee at the meeting at which the student’s petition is heard. Communications to the Executive Committee may be sent through the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs at:  jordancu@email.arizona.edu.
  • Criteria for Readmission. Subject to subsection (C), a disqualified student may be readmitted to the Law College only:  (1) if the student has not already received credit for 88 or more hours of course work toward the J.D. degree; (2) the student persuades the Executive Committee that there were extenuating circumstances, not related to the student’s capacity to perform academically, that resulted in the disqualification, that the circumstances have changed, and (3) the Executive Committee is persuaded that there is a high probability that the student will be able to meet the conditions imposed for readmission.
  • Conditions for Readmission of Disqualified First-Year Students. In addition to the requirements for readmission set forth immediately above, a first-year student who is automatically disqualified may be readmitted only on condition that the student:
    • repeat the entire first year;
    • achieve a semester grade point average of at least 2.0 for the first semester following readmission and an annual grade point average of at least 2.0 for the two semesters of the repeated first year; and
    • achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 by the end of the third semester after readmission, such cumulative grade point average to be based on grades received in all courses taken at the Law College.
  •  
  • All Readmitted Students on Probation. All readmitted students are on probation and, except as otherwise provided immediately above, must meet the conditions specified for students on probation.

Limitation on Readmission

  • A student who, after having been readmitted under Section 2-219, is disqualified a second time under Section 2-212, may not again petition for readmission, and the Executive Committee has no authority to readmit the student.

Finality of Executive Committee Decisions and Reporting Requirements

  • Decisions of the Executive Committee on all matters of probation, disqualification, and readmission are final. The Executive Committee shall report its decisions on these matters to the faculty at the end of each semester.

 

Grade Replacement Opportunity (GRO)

  • Students not on Probation. A student may elect once to repeat any course in which the student receives a grade below a C. The grade received as a result of repeating the course shall replace the grade originally received in the course. In such a case, only the second grade may be used in calculating the student’s cumulative grade point average and only the units for which credit was received in repeating the course count towards the 88 units required for a J.D. degree. However, the original grade shall remain on the student’s transcript. The election to repeat a course may be exercised during the student’s matriculation at the Law College only for a maximum of 10 credits or, if the courses contain a greater number of units, three courses.
  • Students on Probation. Any student required to repeat a course as a condition of probation may elect to replace the grade received in the course on the first attempt with the grade received as a result of repeating the course. In so electing, only the second grade may be used in calculating the student’s cumulative grade point average, but the original grade shall remain on the student’s transcript. Only the units for which credit was received in repeating the course count towards the 88 units required for a J.D. degree. The election, however, must occur prior to the first day of class in the repeated course and may be exercised during the student’s matriculation at the Law College only for a maximum of 10 credits or, if the courses contain a greater number of units, three courses.
  • All students electing or required to use GRO.  Students electing or required to use GRO should speak with the College of Law's Registrar for details on the procedure governing this election. Any student repeating a class and pursuing GRO will be assigned to repeat the class with another instructor whenever possible.

 

Definition of Semester

For the purpose of the rules governing probation and readmission, particularly as they relate to the 2.0 GPA requirement, work undertaken during the summer will be counted together with work undertaken in the following full semester.

 

Appeal

There is no appeal process beyond the Executive Committee.

 

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LL.M./S.J.D. Policies

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Unless excused by an official Leave of Absence, all LLM and SJD students are subject to the Continuous Enrollment Policy and must pay applicable tuition and fees in order to remain in the program. If the student fails to obtain a Leave of Absence or maintain continuous enrollment, he or she will be required to apply for re-admission, pay the Graduate College application fee, and pay all overdue tuition and fees, including cumulative late penalties. Tuition or registration waivers cannot be applied retroactively.

 

Enrollment requirements: Because both the LL.M. and S.J.D. programs are full-time programs, students must maintain full-time enrollment during each of the fall and spring Semesters. During the fall and spring semesters, full-time status during their year of residency consists of enrollment for a minimum of nine units of graduate credit per semester. For SJD students who have completed their course work and are in the dissertation phase of their program, full-time status is three units per semester of 900-level enrollment only. LL.M. and S.J.D .students are not required to register for summer hours unless they are 1) graduating during the summer term and/or 2) plan to utilize faculty time or university resources. If either of those situations applies, the student must enroll for a minimum of 1 unit of graduate credit in applicable summer session. These rules regarding full-time status are University policy. Students who are receiving financial aid and/or scholarships from non-University sources are responsible for consulting with their financial aid provider to ensure that enrollment complies with the funder's regulations. International students should check with the University's International Students Office to ensure that their registration is in compliance with their visa status.

 

Leave of Absence Policy: During the course of their enrollment in the LLM or SJD program, students may be eligible for a leave of absence for academic, medical or personal reasons. Students interested in a LOA should consult the applicable Graduate College Policies and with the appropriate Program Director (IPLP or ITBL). Leaves of Absence (LOAs) may affect the status of a graduate student’s financial aid. Students are responsible for determining the requirements of their funding agency and/or academic unit prior to applying for a Leave of Absence. Failure to obtain a Leave of Absence or remain in continuous enrollment will result in penalties, as described in the Continuous Enrollment policy requirements.

 

Withdrawal from Courses and From the Program: Withdrawal from a course within the first four weeks after registration will result in the deletion of the course from the student’s academic record. After the fourth week and through the end of the eighth week of classes, the grade of "W" may be awarded to students earning a passing grade at the time of the official withdrawal. A student who elects to withdraw from The University by dropping all classes after having paid registration fees must initiate such a procedure by contacting IPLP’s Associate Director. A withdrawal may not be initiated after the last day of classes of any semester, and must be completed before the beginning of the final examination period. Under extraordinary circumstances, a student may petition for withdrawal after completion of classes for a term. If the student has experienced severe physical or psychological stress of such nature as to prevent satisfactory completion of course work in the semester or term in question, the student may petition for retroactive withdrawal from all courses taken that semester or term. This petition must be accompanied by adequate documentation .

 

Probation. If a student in the LLM or SJD program fails a class, the Program Director of IPLP or ITBL may place the student on probation and consult with the appropriate College of Law administrators regarding the scope and conditions of that probation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bar Examinations

Arizona

The Arizona Bar examination is given twice a year during the months of February and July. Students planning to take the examination in February must register between August 15 and November 30.  Students planning to take the July examination must register between January 15 and April 30.  You may order your application from: Committee on Character and Fitness Committee on Examination Arizona Supreme Court Administrative Office of the Courts, 1501 West Washington, Suite 104 Phoenix, AZ 85007-3231   Phone: (602) 452-3971.  You may also download the application from the website.  Please note:   these dates are subject to change.  Please review the Supreme Courts' website: www.supreme.state.az.us/admis/

 

Change in Arizona Testing To Recognize Uniform Bar Examination

The Arizona Supreme Court has adopted the Uniform Bar Examination (UBE).  Applicants passing a UBE are allowed to transfer a passing score earned in Arizona to other UBE jurisdictions without testing, subject to the rules of that state.  UBE rules vary from state to state; please contact specific jurisdictions if you wish to seek admission based on UBE.  Additional information about the Uniform Bar Examination, including a list of UBE jurisdictions, may be found at www.ncbex.org.

 

Rule 34.  Application for Admission

Applicant Requirements and Qualifications. 

1.     No applicant shall be recommended for admission to the practice of law in Arizona by the Committee on Character and Fitness unless the Committee is satisfied that:

  • The applicant is or at the time of the examination will be over the age of twenty-one years;
  • The applicant is of good moral character;
  • The applicant is mentally, emotionally, and physically able to engage in the practice of law, and possesses the required knowledge of the law to do so;
  • The applicant is a graduate with a juris doctor from a law school provisionally or fully approved by the American Bar Association at the time of graduation;  provided that this requirement shall not apply to an examination applicant who has been actively engaged in the practice of law in some other state or states for at least five of the last seven years prior to filing an application for admission to practice in Arizona; and
  • if ever admitted to practice in any jurisdiction, foreign or domestic, the applicant is presently in good standing, or the applicant resigned in good standing or is capable of achieving good standing status in that jurisdiction.

 

The Arizona Supreme Court's Admissions Unit states that: "It is your responsibility to ensure that you are applying for admission on the basis of the most current rules."

http://www.azcourts.gov/cld/AttorneyAdmissions.aspx.

 

There are three paths for admission to the practice of law in the state of Arizona; admission by examination or admission by motion.

 

Rules of Admission

 

GENERAL EXAMINATION INFORMATION

 

Written Examination

Subjects and Timing.

The written portion of the Arizona Uniform Bar Examination consists of six Multistate Essay Examination (MEE) questions and two Multistate Performance Tests (MPT). The test is a secure examination protected by U.S. copyright laws and you will return the test booklet to the Examinations Committee upon completion of each session (morning and afternoon).

All essay questions are suggested to be read and answered in 30 minutes and each MPT question should be read and answered in 90 minutes.  Questions will be not be labeled and subjects may be combined with other subjects in a question or may be separate.  Applicants may be tested on any subject matter listed by the National Conference of Bar Examiners as areas of law to be tested on the Multistate Bar Examination, Multistate Essay Examination, or Multistate Performance Test.

 

Answering Written Portion.

Each answer should demonstrate your ability to analyze facts and law, solve problems, organize and manage information, demonstrate fundamental lawyering skills and communicate effectively.  Each answer should demonstrate your proficiency in applying legal principles rather than a mere memory of them.  You may, but need not, cite legal authority in support of your answer.  State fully the reasons that support your answer.  All points should be thoroughly discussed.

 

If you handwrite, write your answer to each question in a separate answer booklet.  You will be provided with six answer booklets for essays, identified as Questions 1 through 6.  The MPT questions, will be identified as Questions 1 through 2.  Be sure to use the appropriate answer booklet, and be careful not to write a different answer in the same booklet.

Write single spaced in the essay answer booklets on the right side pages of the answer booklet and use the left side pages for any inserts or corrections you may have.  Continuation booklets will be available.

 

Only the material that appears on the pages of the answer and coninuation booklets will be considered in determining your grade.  Do not write your answers on scrap paper.  Answer material you write on scrap paper, even if left in the answer booklet, will not be considered in determining your score.

If you use your laptop computer, you will copy your answers to the USB flash drive provided after each session.

 

Multistate Bar Examination

Subjects and Timing.

This portion of the Arizona Uniform Bar Examination will consist of a sealed test booklet, with an enclosed answer sheet.  No other material will be provided or permitted.  Scrap paper will not be provided or permitted in accordance with the policy of the National Conference of Bar Examiners ("NCBE").

 

The morning and afternoon sessions are three hours each, with 100 questions in each session.  The subject areas, randomly dispersed throughout the 200 questions, include constitutional law, contracts, criminal law and procedure, evidence, real property, and torts, as described in the MBE information available from the NCBE at www.ncbex.org or 1-608-280-8550

 

Answering MBE Questions.

Questions on the Multistate Bar Examination are designed to be answered by applying fundamental legal principles rather than local case or statutory law.  All questions are multiple choice; you are to choose the best answer from the four stated alternatives.

Mark your answers on the computer encoded sheet using the No.2 black lead pencils provided.  Scrap paper is not allowed for the Multistate Bar Examination but you may make notations in the test booklet.

 

Grading and Scoring

Written Examination

The Examinations Committee members (Examiners) are responsible for the grading of the MEE and MPT segments.  The only identification on the answer books is your applicant number.  None of the Examiners or graders is provided any other information about you.

Each written answer is awarded a numerical grade from 0 (lowest) to 6 (highest).

 

Multistate Bar Examination

Grading of the Multistate Bar Examination is performed by the National Conference Bar Examiners (NCBE).  NCBE scores and scales each exam, and provides the Committee with the results.  Your MBE score will be reported to the first decimal place.  All answer sheets are centrally scored by machine regardless of the jurisdiction in which the applicant writes the MBE.  Raw to scaled score conversions are identical for every jurisdiction for the same administration of the MBE, but the scaling conversion will differ between each MBE administration dependent on the performance of the national pool of applicants, and the ease or difficulty level of the questions as compared to previous MBE questions.

 

Computation of Total Scores

The raw scores for written answers will be scaled to the MBE portion of the examination.  MBE scaled scores and written scaled scores shall be combined; the MBE will be weighted 50%, the written answers will be weighted 50%.  An applicant who receives a combined score of 273 or above will be deemed successful.

 

SCHEDULE OF FEES AND FILING DEADLINES (effective January 2, 2012

 

ARIZONA UNIFORM BAR EXAMINATION FEES

Arizona Uniform Bar Examination applicants pay three (3) fees for admission to the practice of law in Arizona:  The Arizona UBE Examination fee, Character Report fee, and Administrative Fee for Admission.  In addition, the applicant is required to pay dues for State Bar membership upon admission; these dues are assessed separately.  The first administration of the Arizona UBE is July 2012.

 

February Exam: 

Arizona UBE Examination filing Deadlines:

August 15 - October 31.  No applications accepted prior to August 15.  Fee:  $580

November 1 - November 30.  Includes $100 late fee.  Fee:  $680

November 30.  Close of Filing for applications and supporting documentation, including accommodation requests.

February 1.  Deadline for evidence of graduation for graduates of law school in previous semester only.

 

July Exam:

Arizona UBE Examination Filing Deadlines:

January 15 - March 30.  No applications accepted prior to January 15.  Fee:  $580

April 1 - April 30.  Includes $100 late fee.  Fee:  $680

April 30.  Close of Filing for applications and supporting documentation, including accommodation requests.

June 15.  Deadline for evidence of graduation for graduates of law school in previous semester only.

 

Character Report:

Character Report (Fee not applicable to UBE Transfer or AOM applicants).  Fee:  $300

Supplemental if previous character report processed within last three years by Arizona.  Fee:  125

 

Administrative Fee for Admission:

The Administrative Fee includes statutory or court established administrative admission fees including the taking of the online version of the Course on Arizona Law.  Dues for State Bar membership are assessed separately.  (Fee not applicable to UBE Transfer or AOM applicants).   Fee:  $160

 

Additional fee for in-person attendance at Course on Arizona Law (fee not applicable to applicants who choose and attend the on-line version).  Fee:  $200

 

UNIFORM BAR EXAMINATION TRANSFER

Applicants who wish to transfer a UBE score earned in another UBE jurisdiction may pay one (1) fee, or two if the applicant elects to take the required Course on Arizona Law in person.  The Application Fee includes all fees for admission including the fee for the required Course on Arizona Law (on-line version only).  Applicants who choose to attend the Course on Arizona law in-person pay an additional fee of $200.  In addition, applicants are required to pay dues for State Bar membership upon admission; these dues are assessed separately.

 

Uniform Bar Examination Transfer

Application for Uniform Bar Examination Transfer.  Fee:  $675

Additional fee for in-person attendance at required Course on Arizona Law (fee not applicable to applicants who choose and attend the on-line version).  Fee:  $200

 

ADMISSION ON MOTION (AOM)

Applicants for Admission on Motion pay one (1) fee.  The Application Fee includes all fees for admission including the required course on Arizona law (on-line or in-person attendance).  In addition, applicants are required to pay dues for State Bar membership upon admission; these dues are assessed separately.

 

Application for Admission on Motion.  Fee:  $1,800

 

OTHER FEES

  • Foreign Legal Consultant Fee.  $525
  • Application:  Printed Application for Admission, or Character Report (materials available online at no cost; fee applies if materials provided in hard copy).  Fee:  $20
  • Copy of Character Report:  for applicant's compliance with filing requirements (if copy is not included at time of filing).  Fee:  $20
  • MBE hand scoring.  Fee: $25
  • NSF Fee:  $40
  • Copy of Application and Character Report:  for personal use or transfer to another jurisdiction.  Fee:  $30
  • Document Deficiency Fee:  assessed if required supporting documents are not filed with application (excpet evidence of graduation for those who have not yet graduated).  Fee:  $100
  • Partial refund of fees if application withdrawn by deadline.  Fee:  $50
  • Use of laptop for Arizona UBE Examination (paid to the laptop vendor).  Fee:  $125

 

For more information on the Arizona Bar, you may access their website at:     www.supreme.state.az.us/admis/ .    Similarly, information about the admission requirements for other state bars will be found on their websites.

 

 

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California

Students planning to take the California Bar Examination should visit the California Bar website:  www.calbar.ca.gov

 

To be admitted to practice law in California, an applicant must:

  1. Complete the necessary general education;
  2. Register with the Committee of Bar Examiners as a law student or attorney applicant;
  3. Complete the requisite legal education;
  4. File an application to take the First-Year Students' Examination and pass, or establish exemption from the examination;
  5. File an application to take the California Bar Examination and after eligibility has been confirmed, take and pass the examination;
  6. File an application for a moral character determination and receive a positive moral character determination from the Committee of Bar Examiners;
  7. File an application, take the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination and achieve a minimum scaled score as determined by the Committee of Bar Examiners, which examination is administered and graded by the National Conference of Bar Examiners (www.ncbex.org);
  8. Be in compliance with California court ordered child or family support obligations; and
  9. Meet all admission requirements and take the attorney's oath of office no later than five years from the last day of administration of the California Bar Examination the applicant passes.

 

The foregoing is a summary of the requirements for admission to practice law in California.  The full text of all requirements for admission are set forth in the rules found in Title 4, Division 1, Chapter 4 of the Rules of the State Bar of California, which are available online at www.calbar.ca.gov.

 

Separate and distinct applications are required for registration, the First-Year Law Students' Examination, a moral character determination, and the bar examination.  All applications can be accessed online through the Admissions' portion of The State of California's Web site at www.calbar.ca.gov/admissions.

 

Applicants taking the California Bar Examination may be required to answer questions involving issues from all of the subjects listed below:
Business Associations Criminal Law & Procedure Remedies
Civil Procedure Evidence Torts
Community Property Professional Responsibility Trusts
Constitutional Law Real Property Wills & Succession
Contracts

 

 

The following provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code should be used where pertinent in answering the essay questions:

  • All of Article 1;
  • All of Article 2;
  • Those provisions of Article 9 concerning Fixtures
  • Business Associations

 

Applicants should be prepared to answer questions that have issues concerning a variety of Business Associations, including, but not limited to Corporations, Sole Proprietorships, Partnerships (General Partnerships, Limited Partnerships, Limited Liability Partnerships), Joint Ventures, Limited Liability Companies, and the principles of Agency inherent in business relationships.

 

Civil Procedure

Applicants should be prepared to answer questions that have issues concerning the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the California Code of Civil Procedure. Applicants should be prepared to discuss the differences between the Federal Rules and the California Rules, especially those California procedures of pleading and practice that have no specific counterparts in the Federal Rules.

 

Evidence

Applicants should be prepared to answer questions that have issues concerning the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code. Applicants should be prepared to compare and contrast the differences between the Federal Rules and the California Evidence Code, especially where the California rules of evidence have no specific counterparts in the Federal Rules.

 

Professional Responsibility

Applicants should be prepared to answer questions that test knowledge of the California Rules of Professional Conduct, relevant sections of the California Business and Professions Code, and leading federal and state case law on the subject in addition to the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and ABA Model Code of Professional Responsibility. Professional responsibility issues may be included in conjunction with any subject tested on the examination.

 

The Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) is a separate requirement for admission to practice law in California. More information concerning the MPRE can be found on the National Conference of Bar Examiners’ Web site at www.ncbex.org.

 

Wills and Succession

Applicants should be familiar with the following provisions of the California Probate Code and understand California law in the specific areas noted:

 

 

Division 2. General Provisions

Part 1. Effect of Death of Married Person on Community and Quasi-Community Property, Sections 100-103

Part 3. Contractual Arrangements Relating to Rights at Death, Sections 140-147, 150

Part 5. Simultaneous Death, Sections 220, 222-224

Part 6. Distribution Among Heirs or Beneficiaries, Section 240

 

Division 6. Wills and Intestate Succession

Part 1. Wills

 

 

Chapter 1. General Provisions, Sections 6100, 6101, 6104, 6105

Chapter 2. Execution of Wills, Sections 6110-6113

Chapter 3. Revocation and Revival, Sections 6120, 6121, 6123

Part 2. Intestate Succession, Sections 6400-6402

Part 3. Family Protection

Former Chapter 5. Spouse and Child Omitted from Will, Former Sections 6560-6562, 570-6573 [for decedents dying prior to January 1, 1998]

 

 

Division 11. Construction of Wills, Trusts and Other Instruments

Part 1. Rules of Interpretation of Instruments, Sections 21105, 21109, 21110, 21137

Part 6. Family Protection: Omitted Spouses and Children [for decedents dying on or after January 1, 1998]

 

Chapter 2. Omitted Spouses, Sections 21610-21612

Chapter 3. Omitted Children, Sections 21620-21623

 

MULTISTATE BAR EXAMINATION (MBE)

The Multistate Bar Examination (MBE) is developed and graded by the National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE).  This portion of the General Bar Examination is an objective six-hour examination containing 200 questions, which is divided into two three-hour sessions during which 100 questions are administered.  The MBE tests six subjects:  Constitutional Law, Contracts, Criminal Law and Procedure, Evidence, Real Property, and Torts.  Information regarding the MBE and an online practice examination are available through the NCBE's Web site at www.ncbex.org.

 

 

 

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Multistate Bar Examination (MBE)

 

The Multistate Bar Examination (MBE) is developed by the National Conference of Bar Examiners and is administered by participating jurisdictions on the last Wednesday in February and the last Wednesday in July of each year.  The purpose of the MBE is to assess the extent to which an examinee can apply fundamental legal principles and legal reasoning to analyze given fact patterns.

 

The MBE contains 200 multiple-choice questions, 190 of which are scored.  The 10 unscored questions are being evaluated for future use; because these questions are indistinguishable from the scored questions, examinees should answer all 200 questions.  The exam is divided into morning and afternoon testing sessions of three hours each, with 100 questions in each session.  The 190 scored questions on the MBE are distributed as follows:  Constitutional Law (31), Contracts (33), Criminal Law and Procedure (31), Evidence (31), Real Property (31), and Torts (33).  Subject matter outlines are available by clicking on http://www.ncbex.org/multistate-tests/mbe

 

Arizona:

State Bar Committee on Examinations/Character and Fitness

Arizona Supreme Court of Arizona

1501 West Washington, Suite 104

 

Phoenix, AZ  85007-323

(602) 452-3971

http://www.azcourts.gov/cld/AttorneyAdmissions.aspx

 

California:

The Committee of Bar Examiners

Office of Admissions

State Bar of California

180 Howard Street

San Francisco, CA  94105-1639

(415) 538-2300

-or-

1149 S. Hill St.

Los Angeles, CA  90015-2299     (213) 765-1500

www.calbar.ca.gov/admissions

 

* To Obtain Information regarding character and fitness, and the qualifications for admission to the Bar in the state(s) in which you intend to practice, please directly contact the State Bar Office in that state.

 

State Bar Office Web sites may be found on the Law School's web page under the Student Services section.

 

Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE)

Most states require that bar applicants pass the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE).  The online version to the 2012 MPRE Information Booklet and registration information appears at:  http://www.ncbex.org/assets/media_files/Information-Booklets/MPREIB2012.pdf

 or www.act.org/mpre.

 

 

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Career & Professional Development

 

The Career & Professional Development Office helps law students decide what to do with their law degrees and achieve their goals through individual counseling, career and professional development programs, and legal internships and Clinic opportunities.  The office has an extensive website allowing students to research employers, find advertised positions, contact law alumni, and access materials for your professional development.  The 1L Handbook for Legal Career Options fully outlines our programs and services.

 

The College of Law, in collaboration with the Pima County Bar Association and the Arizona Women Lawyers Association, sponsors a mentor program for incoming first-year students.  Mentors are attorneys and judges from the Tucson and Phoenix communities who have agreed to serve as guides/counselors to interested students.  The program is coordinated through the Career & Professional Development Office.

 

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Costs and Financial Aid

Financial Aid


The University of Arizona offers a variety of financial aid, including scholarships and loan opportunities. Most students are eligible to receive sufficient financial assistance to cover direct and indirect educational expenses.  Typically, financial aid packages combine two or more of the following types of aid:


  • Scholarships
  • Subsidized Stafford Loans
  • Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
  • Graduate Plus Loans


Information about available scholarships is posted on the Arizona Law website at   http://www.law.arizona.edu/current_students/financial_aid/uascholarships.cfm .  In order to apply for most types of financial aid, students must submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.  The priority processing date for a FAFSA is March 1.  In order to meet this deadline, students should submit their completed FAFSA by mid-February.


Emergency Loans 

Under special circumstances, students may borrow money on a short-term basis from the University of Arizona.  These short-term loans cannot exceed a set amount (typically $750), and must be repaid no later than the end of the semester in which the loan is granted, unless the loan agreement expressly provides otherwise.  In no event shall a short-term loan be extended beyond a student's graduation date.


GI Benefits

Educational benefits are available for eligible veterans.  For more information, contact the Veterans Services Office, Modern Languages, Room 347, Tucson, AZ 85721, (520) 621-9501, veterans@email.arizona.edu.


For further information on all issues concerning financial aid, please contact the College of Law Financial Aid office.

 

 

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Student Health Policy

 

Health Care Options

Students* who are registered for classes at The University of Arizona do not need health insurance in order to access health care at the Campus Health Service (CHS). However, we strongly urge every student to maintain adequate health insurance to cover unexpected medical expenses.

 

Health & Recreation Fee

 

Fee-For-Service

This option is automatic for currently enrolled University of Arizona students.  After designated office visit co-payments at the Campus Health Service, charges are then incurred for pharmacy, laboratory tests, x-rays, medical procedures and supplies.  The fees are generally less expensive than those charged in the community.  Payment is accepted as cash, check, credit card (exclusively for faculty and staff) or Bursar billing (exclusively for registered students). 

Current Fee Schedule, see Student Health Web site at:   www.health.arizona.edu/insurance.htm

 

CampusCare Supplement

This is a prepaid health care option limited to services provided within the Campus Health Service. It serves as an ideal supplement for students covered by private health insurance, where one may have a high deductible, limited benefits or no coverage for charges incurred at the health center. This option also serves well for students who do not have health insurance. After a designated office visit co-payment, all laboratory tests, x-rays, medical procedures and supplies are covered providing the diagnostic work-up is initiated at the Campus Health Service.

 

Student Health Insurance

The University of Arizona offers one major medical health insurance policy designed specifically for eligible University of Arizona students and their dependents. This policy provides coverage nationwide and has an emergency benefit worldwide. All three State of Arizona university health centers serve as primary care providers for the enrolled student.

 

*Attention International Students: The University of Arizona requires that all international students on non-immigrant visas, regardless of classification or number of units, carry the Student Health Insurance unless one qualifies for an exemption. Exemptions must be requested each semester.

Early Arrival Enrollment Application for International Students on non-immigrant visas.

 

Graduate Assistant/Associate Health Insurance Benefit

Providing you order your coverage, The University of Arizona will pay the premium for individual coverage as part of your benefits for being a Graduate Assistant/Associate.

 

Medical Students

If you are a new incoming 1st year medical student, you are eligible to enroll for the student health insurance summer coverage.

 

Post Doctoral Fellows, J1 Visiting Scholars and J1 Interns

If you are not a University of Arizona benefits eligible employee, the Student Health Insurance is an available option.

 

Commercial Health Insurance Plans

Are we a participant to your health insurance plan?  See Student Health Web site at:   www.health.arizona.edu/insurance.htm

 

Dental Discount Program

The Vital Savings Dental Discount Program offered through Aetna and endorsed by the Arizona Board of Regents is available to all registered University of Arizona students.

 

After-Hours Medical Assistance

The Campus Health Service is open Monday through Friday 8am to 4:30pm and Wednesdays 9am to 4:30pm, closed weekends and University holidays. Students in need of medical assistance after clinic hours may access an on-call physician or nurse practitioner by calling (520) 570-7898. In addition, a list of Tucson area Hospitals and Urgent Care facilities can be obtained from the Campus Health Service located outside the front doors of the Urgent Care/Pharmacy entrance.

 

Please direct any questions you may have concerning the health care options to (520) 621-5002.

 

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Health Care Options

Students* who are registered for classes at The University of Arizona do not need health insurance in order to access health care at the Campus Health Service (CHS). However, we strongly urge every student to maintain adequate health insurance to cover unexpected medical expenses.

 

Health & Recreation Fee

 

Fee-For-Service

This option is automatic for currently enrolled University of Arizona students.  After designated office visit co-payments at the Campus Health Service, charges are then incurred for pharmacy, laboratory tests, x-rays, medical procedures and supplies.  The fees are generally less expensive than those charged in the community.  Payment is accepted as cash, check, credit card (exclusively for faculty and staff) or Bursar billing (exclusively for registered students). 

Current Fee Schedule, see Student Health Web site at:   www.health.arizona.edu/insurance.htm

 

CampusCare Supplement

This is a prepaid health care option limited to services provided within the Campus Health Service. It serves as an ideal supplement for students covered by private health insurance, where one may have a high deductible, limited benefits or no coverage for charges incurred at the health center. This option also serves well for students who do not have health insurance. After a designated office visit co-payment, all laboratory tests, x-rays, medical procedures and supplies are covered providing the diagnostic work-up is initiated at the Campus Health Service.

 

Student Health Insurance

The University of Arizona offers one major medical health insurance policy designed specifically for eligible University of Arizona students and their dependents. This policy provides coverage nationwide and has an emergency benefit worldwide. All three State of Arizona university health centers serve as primary care providers for the enrolled student.

 

*Attention International Students: The University of Arizona requires that all international students on non-immigrant visas, regardless of classification or number of units, carry the Student Health Insurance unless one qualifies for an exemption. Exemptions must be requested each semester.

Early Arrival Enrollment Application for International Students on non-immigrant visas.

 

Graduate Assistant/Associate Health Insurance Benefit

Providing you order your coverage, The University of Arizona will pay the premium for individual coverage as part of your benefits for being a Graduate Assistant/Associate.

 

Post Doctoral Fellows, J1 Visiting Scholars and J1 Interns

If you are not a University of Arizona benefits eligible employee, the Student Health Insurance is an available option.

 

Commercial Health Insurance Plans

Are we a participant to your health insurance plan?  See Student Health Web site at:   www.health.arizona.edu/insurance.htm

 

Dental Discount Program

The Vital Savings Dental Discount Program offered through Aetna and endorsed by the Arizona Board of Regents is available to all registered University of Arizona students.

 

After-Hours Medical Assistance

The Campus Health Service is open Monday through Friday 8am to 4:30pm and Wednesdays 9am to 4:30pm, closed weekends and University holidays. Students in need of medical assistance after clinic hours may access an on-call physician or nurse practitioner by calling (520) 570-7898. In addition, a list of Tucson area Hospitals and Urgent Care facilities can be obtained from the Campus Health Service located outside the front doors of the Urgent Care/Pharmacy entrance.

 

Please direct any questions you may have concerning the health care options to (520) 621-5002.

 

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Health Insurance Alert

In years past, some students have required medical care but were not adequately covered by health insurance.  To prevent this occurrence, the College of Law strongly urges every student to maintain health insurance to cover medical expenses.  Below are links to the health insurance options provided by The University of Arizona:

 

For Health Care Options and information about Campus Health Service, see  www.health.arizona.edu/webfiles/main.htm

 

For information about fees and insurance, see www.health.arizona.edu/webfiles/insurance.htm

 

STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN

Administered by Aetna Student Health is a major medical insurance policy designed specifically for eligible University of Arizona students and their dependents.  After the close of the “Open Enrollment”, there are qualifying events that will allow one to come onto the plan.  Information on qualifying events can be obtained by contacting our office.  For benefit information, please visit:

www.health.arizona.edu/insurance_student_health_insurance.htm

www.health.arizona.edu/insurance_gradbenefit.html - Graduate Assistants & Associates

www.health.arizona.edu/insurance_postdoc.html - Post Doctoral Fellows & Visiting Scholars

http://www.health.arizona.edu/insurance_exemptions.htm - International Student exemption requests

 

To enroll, cancel, or change coverage, Go to UAccess Student Center, scroll down to "Finances".  An email confirmation will be received. 

 

Contact Campus Health Service concerning deadlines by submitting an email to chsinsurance@health.arizona.edu or give them a call at 520-621-5002.

 

Payments may be made by check made payable to the Campus Health Service, or by charge posted to the University of Arizona Bursar student account.  For questions specific to insurance coverage call (520) 621-5002.

 

To always have current information on Student Health Insurance,  please visit the websites listed above, or stop by the Campus Health Insurance Office at 1224 E. Lowell Street (next to the 6th street Garage), call (520) 621-6490, or email   chsinsurance@health.arizona.edu

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The Law Library                           

With a collection of over 400,000 volumes and access to a host of legal and law-related online databases, the College of Law Library plays a vital role in fulfilling the College=s dual mission of teaching and research.

 

Subject collections include the Foreign and International collection with a Mexican and Latin American emphasis, an Arizona collection, selected Government Documents, and a small Commonwealth collection.  The Law Library also holds extensive water law and Native American law collections. Special Collections contains historical treatises, many one-of-a-kind items, documents relating to the Colorado River litigation, as well as books authored by current and former College of Law faculty.  Special rules govern the use of these materials.  The Law Library also has a microform collection of United States, Ninth Circuit, and some Arizona Supreme Court records and briefs, Code of Federal Regulations, Federal Registers, state session laws, Attorney General opinions, bar journals and legal newspapers, and American Law Institute materials.

 

An experienced staff of professional librarians and paraprofessionals offer faculty and students a variety of services; of the nine professional librarians, all have masters degrees in library science and six have JDs. Services include an online catalog for accessing university-wide collections and resources; a computer lab with Bloomberg, Lexis-Nexis, Westlaw, and wireless internet access; borrowing privileges; Interlibrary Loan service; a Reserve Collection providing ready access to frequently-used student materials; legal research classes; and individualized reference and research guidance.  The library website, www.law.arizona.edu/library, contains links to legal information and more detailed information about the library.

 

Regular library hours are available at the following link:         

www.law.arizona.edu/library.

 

Hours may vary during vacation and intersession periods.  Notice of any change in hours will be posted in the Library and the weekly College of Law newsletter. You can also access the hours online or call the Reserve/Circulation desk at 621-1413, or visit the law library's web site at www.law.arizona.edu/library.

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Computer Lab

The Computer Lab is for the exclusive use of College of Law students.  In order that we may enforce this policy, please be prepared to show your UA ID card.  No student may allow another student to have access to the computer equipment or to your password.  Accessing any other user's material without the proper authorization of the owner of that material, or allowing others to use your password, may be deemed a violation of the honor code.

 

There is absolutely no eating, drinking, or smoking permitted in the lab or while using any of the college's computer equipment anywhere in the building.  No drinks, cups, or bottles are permitted in the lab at any time.  Violation of this policy will result in a loss of lab use privileges.

 

Students may not install any software, programs, or games on the lab computers without the permission of the Computer Services Librarian.  Violation of this policy will result in a loss of lab use privileges.

 

Students may not make any changes to the Windows Desktop, or changes to any program preferences without the permission of the Computer Services Librarian.  Violation of this policy will result in a loss of lab use privileges.

 

The primary uses of the computer lab are approved class projects, information technology research, legal research and word processing, and primary users will have priority in the use of the facilities.

 

Students assume all risk of equipment failure or malfunction.  The University of Arizona College of Law, its employees, and student lab assistants are not responsible for the performance of software or hardware, or for the destruction of data or media, including, but not limited to computer disks.

 

Students are responsible for any violation of copyright law.  None of the copyrighted programs or manuals in the computer lab may be duplicated in any form.

 

To gain access to the computer equipment and to the College of law network, students MUST acquire a University email account.

 

Students are responsible for knowing and understanding these policies, as well as any additional policies posted inside or outside the lab or published electronically over the computer network.  The burden is on you - if you're not sure, ask before you act.

 

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Student Committees/Activities

 

The SBA President recommends students to the Dean of the College of Law for appointment to the student committees.  The functions of each of the committees are set out briefly below.

 

Election

The responsibility of this committee is to insure compliance with the SBA Constitution during student elections.  The Election Committee will publish the candidacy and election procedure prior to each election.  Contact the SBA President or the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs to obtain a copy of the SBA Constitution.

 

Executive

This committee is comprised of the five SBA officers and the Chairperson of the Board of Governors.  The Executive Committee is responsible for the administration of the Student Bar.  It has authority to allocate SBA funds for projects it deems worthwhile.

 

Orientation

This committee assists in developing and implementing the orientation programs for new law students.

 

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Student Organizations

 

Student Bar Association

The purpose of the Student Bar Association (SBA) is to provide a vehicle through which students may collectively participate in enhancing their law school experience.  The SBA is designed to introduce students to the many facets of the legal profession, to encourage a thorough legal education, to provide both social and educational extracurricular activities, and to promote professional responsibility within the student body.

 

The Student Bar Association is a member of the American Law Student Association, the student affiliate of the American Bar Association.  While all regularly enrolled law students automatically become members of the SBA, annual dues are requested.

 

SBA Officers

The student government is comprised of the following elective officers:  President, Vice-President, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, Treasurer and the seven members of the Board of Governors.  Selection for these officers consists of a nominating primary and election held in the spring.  A student seeking candidacy must comply with the procedure established by the SBA Constitution. 


Board of Governors

The SBA Board of Governors is elected by the student body and consists of seven law students.  The Board's most important function is to create a professional atmosphere by making students aware of their responsibilities to themselves and to fellow students.

 

Funding

Please see the College of Law policies for information on how to recieve reimbursement for costs related to student organization events. Not following the procedures properly may result in denial of reimbursement.

 

* [The descriptions that follow are provided by the organizations described.]

Advocates for Life

"Advocates for Life" is a pro-life organization.  We believe that every human being is intrinsically valuable.  We believe that every human being begins life at the moment of conception.  From that moment on, every human being is a person worthy of basic human rights.  Among these rights is the right to life.  Our goal as an organization is to promote the recognition of the humanity of every person, even the smallest and most helpless among us."

 

American Bar Association Law Student Division

The Law Student Division (LSD) of the American Bar Association is the largest professional student organization in the nation with a total enrollment of approximately 40,000 students.  The University of Arizona is located in the 15th Circuit, which comprises all ABA-approved law schools in the Rocky Mountain area.

 

Nationally, the LSD offers benefits to its members such as the Student Lawyer, ABA Journal, free legal writing and career placement booklets, health and life insurance, a direct voice in ABA policy making, and reduced price memberships in any of the 25 sections of the ABA which deal with particular areas of law such as Criminal Justice, Natural Resources, Corporations, Banking, and Business Law.

 

The chapter has received a certificate of merit from the American Bar Association.  Membership is open to all students in the College of Law.

 

American Civil Liberties Union

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is dedicated to protecting the Constitution and extending its liberties to all people within the United States.  The U of A student division brings speakers to campus, sponsors an on-going film series, administers an essay contest for high school students, and serves as volunteer legal observers for local political demonstrations.

 

American Constitution Society for Law and Policy

The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy (ACS) is one of the nation's leading progressive legal organizations.  Founded in 2001, ACS is a rapidly growing network of lawyers, law students, scholars, judges, and policymakers.

ACS is a non-partisan, non-profit educational organization that affirms the belief that law can and should be a force for improving the lives of all people.  Members believe in the vitality of the Constitution and reject the idea of law as a series of sterile abstractions.  To that end, ACS promotes the abiding principles of the framers of the U.S. Constitution and the wisdom of forward-looking leaders who have shaped American law throughout its history.  As a result of their efforts, the Constitution has retained authority and relevance for each new generation.

The mission of ACS is to uphold the U.S. Constitution and it fundamental values:  individual rights and liberties, genuine equality, access to justice, democracy, and the rule of law.  ACS aims to revitalize and transform legal and policy debates in classrooms, courtrooms, legislatures and the media.  The UA Student Chapter provides a central meeting place to explore ideas, express views, and participate in activities that have a positive impact on the law.

 

Arizona Intellectual Property & Cyberlaw Society (AIPCS)

This is a student run organization focused on supplementing Intellectual Property classes with speakers, conferences, networking events, and symposia.  We love technology and the possibilities that patents, copyrights, trademarks, and cybersecurity create in our changing world.  The club also is determined to bridge the gap between Arizona Law and computer-focused departments on the main campus, such as MIS and Computer Science.  Additionally, we offer both peer and adviser guidance on student career paths and class choices.

 

Arizona Journal of Environmental Law & Policy

  The Arizona Journal of Environmental Law and Policy (AJELP) is a student-run scholarly journal dedicated to publishing academic work on the most important environmental issues of the day in addition to providing students an environment in which they can enhance their legal skills. Students are selected to the journal based on their performance in the write-on competition as well as their personal and professional interests and skills expressed in a separate application.  They receive one unit of credit for each year of work on the journal in addition to having their work published for a global audience.  AJELP's progressive online publication format allows it to publish more timely pieces through its rolling publication schedule, keeping both readers and its student editors abreast of pressing environmental issues.  Students interested in AJELP membership or in general are encourage to visit www.ajelp.com to learn more.

 

Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law

The Journal is a scholarly law review that analyzes international legal issues and provides student writers with an intensive atmosphere to develop their legal writing skills.  It publishes two volumes per year with articles from authors around the world and students at the University of Arizona.  Student writers receive an invitation to join after a Write-On Competition in the spring of their first year.  By satisfactorily completing a note of publishable quality and earning a total of four Journal units, Journal writers satisfy the College's Substantial Paper graduation requirement.  No more than three (3) units may be earned in one academic year.  The final decision for award of credit rests with the Faculty Advisor to the Journal.

By-laws for the Journal shall be adopted by the Editorial Board, subject to the approval of the faculty.  Any change in approved by-laws of the Journal shall be submitted to the faculty for approval.  By-laws of the Journal shall include the following:  (1) criteria and processes for selection of staff writers; (2) criteria and processes for selection of editors; (3) rules, consistent with College of Law Faculty Rules and By-Laws ' 4-402, for the award of academic credit; and (4) rules governing the commitments of staff and editors to the Journal and excluding or limiting any inappropriate outside activities.

 

Arizona Law Review

The Arizona Law Review is a scholarly journal under the control of an editorial board comprised entirely of third-year students.  Published quarterly, the Law Review contains student notes and comments on legal topics, as well as articles by attorneys, professors, and judges.

 

Students are selected for the second-year writing staff during their second semester in law school.  Candidates are selected on the basis of grades and through a "Write-On" program.  By satisfactorily completing a note of publishable quality and earning four Law Review units, Law Review writers may satisfy the College's Substantial Paper graduation requirement.  No more than three (3) units may be earned in one academic year.  The final decision for award of credit rests with the Faculty Advisor to the Law Review.

 

By-laws for the Law Review shall be adopted by the Editorial Board, subject to the approval of the faculty.  Any change in approved by-laws of the Law Review shall be submitted to the faculty for approval.  By-laws of the Law Review shall include the following:  (1) criteria and processes for selection of staff writers; (2) criteria and processes for selection of editors; (3) rules, consistent with College of Law Faculty Rules and By-Laws, for the award of academic credit; and (4) rules governing the commitments of staff and editors to the Law Review and excluding or limiting any inappropriate outside activities.

 

Asian Pacific American Law Students Association

If you are of Asian or Pacific-American descent, or simply enjoy the traditions of these cultures, it is wholeheartedly recommended that you join the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association (APALSA).  As a member of APALSA, you will be situated among students with whom you share common ties and/or a desire to celebrate and cherish the Asian and Pacific-American heritages.  APALSA also strives to maintain a strong connection with those in the greater Tucson legal community who share the same outlook and pride as APALSA.                                   


Black Law Students Association

The Black Law Student Association (BLSA) is a professional, nationally-affiliated organization of Black law students.  The purpose of the organization is to support Black students in reaching their academic, professional and social goals.  Community service, networking, professional development and continued education are BLSA's primary objectives.  BLSA focuses on building connections between student and professional organizations that share BLSA's vision for a legal community enriched by diversity.  BLSA welcomes all student participation to further these goals.


Business Law Society

The Business Law Society (BLS) is a student organization for law students who have a desire to work in one of the many fields of business law.  BLS is dedicated to providing opportunities for law students to learn more about various aspects of business and corporate law, enriching students' professional and personal development with additional resources concerning networking and career guidance, and working to strengthen the business law curriculum within the law college.  More information can be found at http://www.law.arizona.edu/blp/society.cfm.


Christian Legal Society

The Christian Legal Society (CLS) is a nondenominational group of Christian law students who meet to share their faith and apply the relevant truth of the Bible to the struggles of law school and the law profession.  Meetings may involve a guest attorney practicing in Tucson, service projects or just an informal time to eat lunch.  The national CLS is actively involved in religious freedom issues at the local, state and national levels through the Center of Law and Religious Freedom.  The Center participates regularly in major cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and elsewhere, generally as "friend of the court."

 

Criminal Law and Policy Program

The Program:  The Rogers College of Law offers an extensive criminal law program that includes a range of classroom and courtroom opportunities.  The curriculum includes a variety of courses, from basic introductory classes to specialized seminars in particular fields of practice.  These classes are taught by legal scholars who are members of the full-time faculty as well as distinguished practitioners.  Students interested in advanced research and writing in the area of criminal law can arrange independent studies with members of the faculty.  Vice-Dean & Ralph Bilby Professor of Law Marc Miller and Professor of Law and Director of Rogers Program on Law and Society Katherine Barnes serve as directors of the program.

The Weekly Speaker Series:  Every Wednesday at lunchtime, the Program in Criminal Law and Policy brings individual speakers or panels to campus to discuss issues relevant to the practice of criminal law.

The Certificate:  Students at the College of Law may enroll in a program that will lead to the award of a Certificate in Criminal Law and Policy at Commencement.  The program offers a structured curriculum preparing students for careers in criminal prosecution, defense, and policy, and a credential attesting to their commitment and training in the field.  Students must enroll prior to the beginning of their fifth semester of law school, i.e., generally no later than the end of the second year.


Environmental Law Society

Arizona Law students support an active chapter of the Environmental Law Society (ELS) by hosting speakers, films, and other events that encourage awareness and further study of how the law intersects with the environment.  Law students are exposed to historical, current, and emerging issues as well as the practical dimensions of environmental law practice.

ELS strives for two primary goals:

First, to serve as an informational and contacts resource for students interested in the fantastic Environmental Law Program and courses at the Law School.

Second, through organized activities, we strive to better involve law students with local environmental issues and to build connections between the law school and the local environmental community.

If you think you might be interested in the club, you are encouraged to join the ELS facebook group, "University of Arizona Environmental Law Society."

 

The Federalist Society

The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy is a group of conservative and libertarian students that promotes the separation of governmental powers and a judiciary that will "say what the law is, not what it should be."  The Federalist Society invites speakers to campus to debate all sides of an issue, not just the popular viewpoints.


Immigration Law  Student Association

The Immigration Law Student Association (ILSA) is dedicated to the professional development of students interested in the field of immigration law and policy. Yearly events include: service opportunities which provide students with opportunities to gain legal experience in immigration, while serving the community, including volunteering with attorneys to help individuals apply for naturalization or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA); as well as, community outreach like hosting the Naturalization Ceremony at the Law school with USCIS, a tour of the U.S. Mexico border, mixers with Tucson & Phoenix Immigration attorneys, & film screenings. In Spring 2014, ILSA also launched an immigration attorney mentoring program, matching students with immigration attorneys in the area. Other events are also educational like hosting lunchtime speaker events with experts in immigration. Past speakers include: Federal Public Defender Heather Williams on Operation Streamline and local attorney Williams Walker on civil disobedience on the border.

 

Intellectual Property Student Association

The Intellectual Property Student Association (IPSA) is dedicated to sustainable growth, supporting its members’ desires in the IP field.  IPSA hopes to continue organizational growth with more speakers and networking opportunities to give members the advantage in the IP legal community.  While the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office requires a hard-science background to pursue a career in patent prosecution, IPSA is built for every background.  IPSA meets monthly and hosts relevant speakers.

 

International Law Society

The mission of the International Law Society (ILS) shall be to promote awareness of international law and careers therein, improve students’ knowledge of international law and current international issues, and maintain contacts with and among students who desire to explore international law.  These objectives shall be met by bringing speakers onto campus; coordinating visits to relevant international events, and organizations; interacting with the law school’s international law faculty; networking among students, faculty, alumni and other organizations; and maintaining a list of contacts who practice international law.

 

J. Reuben Clark Law Society

The J. Reuben Clark Law Society is a student chapter of the international JRCLS organization. The chapter affirms the strength brought to the law by a lawyer's personal religious conviction. Members strive through public service and professional excellence to promote fairness and virtue founded upon the rule of law.

As a student chapter of the U of A, particular attention is paid to helping fellow students make their way through law school, focusing on academic and social help, and sharing common experiences to make the law-school experience more worthwhile.

Although most members are Latter Day Saints, those of all faiths are welcome. As Law Society members we can mentor and support each other, as well as be of service and an influence for good in the community. It is hoped that the support and camaraderie of other Law Society members will be felt by becoming involved in the Society's activities.

 

Jewish Law Students Association

The Jewish Law Students Association (JLSA) is a student organization and a local chapter of the National Jewish Law Students Association. JLSA is affiliated with Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life, and the University of Arizona Hillel Foundation.  JLSA's mission is to foster a Jewish identity in legal professionals and students and to promote their active involvement in the Tucson and national Jewish communities.

 

Latino Law Student Association (LLSA)

The Latino Law Student Association is dedicated to providing focused support to the Latino/a population.  LLSA is able to provide a vast network for Latino/a students at the U of A by integrating mentoring programs, career services, and developing relations within the legal community and Latino community at large.

 

Law Parents Club

The Law Parents Club is primarily a social organization dedicated to creating a support network for students with families.  We feel that during the challenging and stressful experience that is law school, it is important for students, their significant others, and their children, to foster friendships with those in the same situation.  It is also our goal to give back to the community by participating in small fundraising efforts for organizations that aid families in crisis.  We are proud to include students of a variety of ages and situations, and we welcome anyone who wants to join!

 

Law Student Legal Referral Clinic

The Law Student Legal Referral Clinic is held for two hours every Saturday of the school year at Woods Memorial and Himmel Park Libraries.  At each session, student volunteers meet with members of the community and listen to them describe their legal problems.  After listening to each person's legal problems, student volunteers then refer the clients to the appropriate community legal resources, and give the clients information about each resource.  The client leaves each meeting with a list of the names, addresses, and phone numbers for the relevant resources.  We try to guide people to the appropriate (often low-cost) organization or tool that will help them to address their legal issues.  We do not give legal advice; but we do try to provide clarity and direction to people who feel lost or don't know where to turn for help."

 

Law Students for Reproductive Justice

Law Students for Reproductive Justice (LSRJ) is a national nonprofit network of law students and lawyers.  LSRJ educates, organizes, and supports law students to ensure that a new generation of advocates will be prepared to protect and expand reproductive rights as basic civil and human rights. Reproductive justice connotes collective efforts to address and overcome the roots of reproductive oppression, while constructing legally tenable, realistically accessible avenues for informed, consensual, unobstructed decision making about education, sex, contraception, sterilization, abortion, procreation, birth, and parenting. Reproductive justice will be achieved when all people and communities have access to the information, resources, and support they need to attain sexual and reproductive self-determination. in short, we support the right to have children, the right to not have children, and the right to parent the children we have.

 

Law Women's Association

The Law Women's Association (LWA) is an organization devoted to the support and encouragement of women in the professional world.  LWA provides resources to students and others interested in improving the status of women in both academic and professional settings.  By serving as facilitators among students, faculty, local organizations, and the Arizona Women Lawyers Association, LWA supplies a forum for the exchange of ideas, a vehicle for change, and a tight-knit community for support within a larger environment that is not always so receptive to women.  LWA meets twice a month and periodically hosts brown-bag luncheons on legal issues of interest to women.  Topics have included alternative dispute resolution, reproductive rights, and interviewing skills.  LWA also organizes a big-sister, big-brother mentoring program and provides scholarships to qualified applicants. 


LEAD Mentoring

LEAD Mentoring is a unique program pairing law students with undergraduates at the U of A who are considering applying to law school. Law students serve as mentors to undergraduates, assisting them with the application process and answering questions about the transition to law school.  Mentors are expected to regularly meet with their mentees to ensure that any questions they have about law school are answered.  LEAD organizes one professional and one social event each month.  Professional events may include administering a practice LSAT or arranging for a mentee to shadow their mentor for a law school class. 

Although LEAD encourages mentees to apply to law school (and perhaps even attend U of A), a successful mentor-mentee match does not have to result in the mentee attending U of A Law, or even attending law school. Mentors instead should act as a friend and advisor, and encourage their mentees to pursue a career that will bring them happiness, regardless of whether that career is in the law. this program is an excellent opportunity for law students to meaningfully impact the lives of others on campus.

 

Middle Eastern Law Students Association

The Middle East Law Students Association (MELSA)'s mission is to promote dialogue on important issues pertaining to the Middle East and American-Middle Eastern relations.  MELSA hosts many events including hosting guest speakers, social activities, and food sales.  If you are interested in international law, current events in the Middle East, or if you share any of the Middle Eastern cultures, MELSA may be a good fit for you!  If you need any assistance, or would like to join our association, please contact MELSA's President, Mae Innabi, at innabi@email.arizona.edu.

 

Moot Court

Law students are introduced to oral and written appellate advocacy in the Moot court programs.  Each spring, second-year students can enroll in the Second-Year Moot Court competition, known as the Samuel M. Fegtly Moot Court Competition. The Second-Year Program is an elective, 2 unit course.  Persuasive Communication (Law 653a) is a prerequisite to Second-Year Moot Court, Jessup Moot Court, and Pace Environmental Moot Court.  Editing assistance and practice oral arguments are provided by the Moot Court Board (third-year students who excelled in the second-year competition the previous year).  Each student writes a brief and argues before local attorneys, judges, faculty members, and members of the Moot Court Board.  The briefs and preliminary oral rounds are scored, with the students scoring highest moving to the semifinals and finals.  The finals are usually judged by a panel consisting of outstanding judges and practitioners.  Past judges in the competition have included judges from the U.S. Court of Appeals, the Arizona Supreme Court, the Arizona Court of Appeals, and the Arizona Superior Court.

 

Third-year students are allowed to participate in Second-Year Moot Court but are not eligible for honors awarded in the competition.  The finalists in the Fegtly competition are eligible in their third year to be members of the national Moot Court Team and the Moot Court Board.  The national team represents the College of Law in the national competition held each Spring by the American Bar Association.  The two- or three-person teams write briefs and argue in the regional competition against teams from other schools, with winners of the regional competition advancing to the finals.  The members of the Moot Court Board supervise the second year competition, administer the competition, edit briefs, select judges, and judge practice rounds.  Unit credit is available for the national team and Moot Court Board work.

 

Qualified, selected students may participate in either the National Moot Court Competition or the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition for two units of credit.  However, students may not participate in either competition more than once.  Further, students will not be permitted to participate in both the National Competition and the Jessup Competition.

 

National Lawyers Guild

The National Lawyers Guild (NLG) is dedicated to the need for basic and progressive change in the structure of our political and economic system.  The U of A NLG runs three clinics for the indigent and disadvantaged populations of Tucson, sponsors lectures and programs, and volunteers as civil liberties watchdogs during political protests.

 

Native American Law Student Association

NALSA is a non-exclusive, national organization dedicated to issues facing the Native Americans in the law; and encouraging participation in the Native American community through clinical programs, summer internships, and the Federal Bar Association's Indian Law Conference.

 

NALSA works closely with the Office of Indian Programs, and the College of Law Administration in addressing the needs of Native American law students.  NALSA encourages participation of non-Native Americans who may have an interest in International Law, Natural Resources Law, or Family Law, as all are components of Indian Law.

 

National Contract Management Association Student Group (NCMA)

The NCMA , founded in 1959, is the world's leading professional resource for those in the field of contract management.  The organization, which has over 21,000 members, is dedicated to the professional growth and educational advancement of procurement and acquisition personnel worldwide.  NCMA strives to serve and inform the profession it represents and to offer opportunities for the open exchange of ideas in neutral forums.

The Student Group of the NCMA is a partnership between The University of Arizona Colleges of Business, Law, and Engineering, local businesses, and the professional Saguaro Chapter of the NCMA.

 

Oral Advocacy Organization

Whether one is standing in front of a jury, negotiating a settlement or explaining a legal issue to a client, verbal communication is an essential skill in the legal world.  The Oral Advocacy Organization (OAO) is an organization that recognizes the importance of oral advocacy excellence and dedicates itself to fostering that excellence among students for use in the law.  OAO aims to augment the legal curriculum by providing opportunities to gain hands-on experience and to learn from skilled professionals.  The faculty adviser is Professor Thomas Mauet, one of the nation’s foremost authorities on trial techniques. 

 

All law students are invited to join the OAO, and to weekly meetings where OAO members are randomly selected for impromptu debates and brief speeches. OAO plans to conduct competitive event training and host guest presenters from different legal fields that emphasize the use of oral communication. In addition to normal meetings, OAO will also sponsor:  Courtrooms Visits; Weekend Workshops; Undergraduate Moot Court Tournaments; and a Competitive Mock Trial Team.

 

OAO is very excited to help develop opportunities that will be infinitely valuable to law students during law school and beyond.  OAO welcomes the help and support of those who can lend it. 

 

Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, International

Founded in 1902, P.A.D. is a professional law fraternity composed of law students, attorneys, judges, and educators.  P.A.D. seeks all law students willing to dedicate themselves to service to the student, the school, the profession, and the community. 

 

What P.A.D. does:  Bridges the gap between undergraduate work, law school, and the practice of law.  P.A.D. promotes professional, social, academic, and community service programs designed to broaden the professional experience of its members.  P.A.D. strives to provide all interested members with a leadership role.  Annual events include speakers from the legal community, alumni networking, and a food drive.  P.A.D. also seeks to strike a balance between school and social activities, providing various social events throughout the semester.

 

Join the legacy: P.A.D. has more chapters than any other law fraternity with over 180 Law School Chapters, 95 Alumni Chapters, and over 200 Pre-Law Chapters; in fact, one of every five American attorneys is a member.  With more than 250,000 members worldwide, PAD is dedicated to promoting professional competency, service, and achievement within the legal profession.

 

Phi Delta Phi

Phi Delta Phi (PDP) is the oldest and largest legal fraternity in the world.  More American Presidents, Justices of the Supreme Court, State and Federal Judges, Governors, Senators, Representatives, Cabinet Members, Ambassadors, American and Canadian Bar Association presidents and law school deans have come from the ranks of Phi Delta Phi than from any other legal fraternity. 

 

During 2005-06, PDP was honored to win the Andrew Silverman Community service Award for outstanding student organization.  Some of PDP’s events have included packing boxes at the Community Food Bank, volunteering as bailiffs at the High School Mock Regional Trails, volunteering at the Habitat for Humanity Store, and raising money for the Katrina Relief Red Cross Fund.  PDP has also worked with the Pima County Bar Association Young Lawyers' Division on a trick-or-treat fund-raiser for the Food Bank. 

 

Among PDP's current plans are a series of lectures on legal ethics and professionalism and continued volunteer work in the community.  PDP also plans more social events such as seasonal parties and joint dinners with other organizations like the Pima County Bar Association Young Lawyers' Division.

 

PDP's dedication to community service is driven neither by religious nor political ideology, but by the will of its individuals to foster an appreciation for ethical behavior and to create a good impression of our oft-maligned profession.  Membership is open to all students in good standing.

 

Pride Law

Pride Law welcomes all students regardless of sexuality or gender identification.  Pride Law’s goal is to improve the legal status of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people on both a local and national level and to provide a forum for LGBT students and their allies to share ideas and concerns.

 

Pride Law is one of the only student organizations to run its own legal clinic, and the clinic is a great place to get some hands-on legal experience during your 1L year.  The clinic is hosted by Wingspan, Tucson’s LGBT community center, and Pride Law members volunteer for weekly shifts where they provide information and referrals to community members with LGBT related legal questions.  As a group, Pride Law offers a variety of both service and policy oriented opportunities, as well as low-key social events. 

 

Public Interest Law Organization

The Public Interest Law Organization (PILO) is a student- run organization dedicated to promoting public interest law among law students.  PILO provides grants to students who accept summer internships in the public sector that are low or non-paying; facilitates a network of support for students interested in pursuing public interest law; exposes the law school community to public interest law; and encourages students to pursue careers in the public sector. 1L's may serve as PILO officers.

 

Rogers Law Vets

 

Sports & Entertainment Law Society

The Sports & Entertainment Law Society (SELS) provides opportunities for College of Law students to learn about the diverse field of entertainment law. The organization's goal is to provide opportunities, resources, guidance, and contacts for interested students.  It is anticipated that monthly forums and speakers will be presented.

 

Student Animal Legal Defense

 

Students of Arizona Health Law Organization

The mission of the Students of Arizona Health Law Organization (SAHLO) is to provide opportunities for students to learn about the expansive field of health law as well as to foster connections between students and professionals in the legal world and other health disciplines.  SAHLO's goals include: educating members about various topics related to health law; creating connections between SAHLO students and students in other health disciplines; giving back to the community through education, mentorship, and volunteerism; contributing to the development of the health law curriculum at the James E. Rogers College of Law; and affiliating with the American Health Lawyers Association.

 

Wills for Heroes

The Wills for Heroes student chapter helps create wills for local first responders including police officers, firefighters, and federal law enforcement agents.  No training is required.  Volunteers serve as witnesses to the wills, and work with notaries and first responders as they finalize their wills and estate planning documents.  Volunteers may also shadow an attorney while they create the documents.  Typically, events are a few times a semester on Saturdays.  Shifts run from either 9:00-1:00 or 1:00-5:30.  Free lunch is usually served, and the dress is casual.

Wills for Heroes provides essential legal documents free of charge to our nation's first responders, including wills, living wills, and powers of attorney,.  By helping first responders plan now, they ensure their family's legal affairs are in order before a tragedy hits. 

 

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Student-Faculty Committees

There are a number of student-faculty committees.  With the exception of the Executive and Admissions Committees, these commit­tees do not take formal action but do make recommendations to the faculty.  A brief description of student-faculty committees follows.

 

Admissions

The Admissions Committee is responsible for formulating admission policies with faculty consultation, including determining the optimum size of the entering class, setting admission standards and selecting applicants.

 

Curriculum

The responsibility of this committee is to evaluate and when appropriate, to recommend changes in the curriculum.  The Curriculum Committee is also charged with the responsibility of studying the grading policies.

 

Executive Committee

The Executive Committee has the responsibility for implementing basic administrative policy where committee action is necessary.  The Committee performs functions specifically delegated by the law faculty or the Dean.  Additionally, the functions of this Committee include:  hearing grade grievance petitions, considering petitions for waiving course and credit requirements, ruling on academic disqualification and probation matters, acting on petitions for readmission, acting on petitions for reduced or excess course loads, acting on petitions to change exam times that are referred by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, acting on applications to take more than (6) six units of Independent Research, and approving class standings.  The student members of this Committee may be excluded from any meeting at the motion of the chairperson whenever he or she deems the presence of students inappropriate.  Additionally, any student presenting a petition to the Committee may exclude the student members during the consideration of that petition.

 

The Executive Committee also serves as the College's Honor Council when, as the Honor Council, the procedures outlined in the Honor Code govern (see p.66 and following of this Handbook).  Students requesting Executive Committee action should contact Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Dr. Willie Jordan-Curtis, for necessary advice and information on proper procedure.

 

Faculty Selection
This Committee is charged with responsibility for the preliminary recommendations of temporary and permanent faculty appointments.

 

Faculty Meetings

The President of the Student Bar Association (SBA), the Chairperson of the Board of Governors and one other student, selected by the student body in the manner it may determine, are invited to participate as non­voting student representatives at all regular faculty meetings, or certain portions thereof, at which the Dean deems their attendance appropriate.

 

One or more other students may be invited to attend a partic­ular faculty meeting when it is determined that the student(s) may contribute significantly to the resolution of a specific issue before the faculty.

 

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College of Law Policies

With respect to academic integrity, The University of Arizona Main Campus has adopted a Code of Academic Integrity that sets forth prohibited conduct, sanctions, student responsibility, faculty responsibility, student rights, and appeal procedures.  The College of Law has adopted similar prohibitions, rights, requirements and procedures embodied in its Honor Code.  There can be no choice of academic integrity Codes.  Law students are required to comply with and are subject to the procedures contained in the Honor Code.  Note, however, that when a law student takes classes on main campus, transactions regarding those classes are governed by the Main Campus Code of Academic Integrity. 

 

Additionally, all students are subject to the Student Code of Conduct (ABOR 5-308 et seq.) and other policies adopted by the University. Here are links to The University Code of Academic Integrity and the  Student Code of Conduct.


Law students are, as are all students, subject to the Student Code of Conduct (ABOR 5-308 et seq.) and other policies adopted by the University.  The Code of Conduct spells out Prohibited Conduct and sanctions for such conduct.  Additionally, student conduct which violates state or federal law has a bearing on the fitness to practice law, and must be reported by the student when applying to take the bar exam.  Further, any conviction in a student’s file must be reported by the College of Law when asked to certify the student for bar admission. 

 

The College of Law takes seriously its responsibility to foster civility and professionalism in its students.  It is expected that students will timely respond to faculty and staff requests for information or meetings to discuss matters of concern.  It is further expected that students will, at all times, deal courteously with fellow students, staff, faculty and administrators.

 

Student Reimbursement Guidelines

Students of the University of Arizona who incur expenses while on official business for the College of Law may be eligible for reimbursement. Eligibility is at the sole discretion of the College Dean or Assistant Dean of Finance, or designees. The Student Bar Association and the Chair(s) of the Skills Competitions have been designated authority to award travel grant funds and funding for moot court/skills competitions, respectively.

When in doubt, prior to spending your money, check with the College Finance Office first to ensure reimbursement requirements.

Following is a non-exhaustive set of basic procedures for reimbursement. The College operates under significant public oversight and scrutiny, and is subject to numerous federal, state, University, and College policies. Failing to comply with all applicable policies and time deadlines could result in denial of reimbursement requests.

 

If you have questions about reimbursements the College's Finance Office.

 

General Guidance

  • All reimbursements should be reasonable and have a clear and obvious business purpose
  • Submit original itemized receipts or invoices - credit card statements are never allowed as proof of payment by the IRS or the University
  • Payments using gift cards and reward points are not considered out-of-pocket expenses and cannot be reimbursed
  • Alcohol may never be reimbursed
  • All students are responsible for their own expenses. If sharing hotel rooms or cab fares, please contact the College Finance Office to discuss how to be reimbursed.
  • Submit reimbursement documents no later than 10 days following the date of the event for prompt payment. All reimbursement requests paid more than 60 days after the date of the receipts may be considered taxable income to the requestor by the IRS.
  • The University's fiscal year ends on June 30. In order to comply with University fiscal year closure deadlines, reimbursement requests must be submitted no later than June 10 of each year. If you will return after June 10 from your event, please contact the College Finance Office prior to leaving for trip to ensure timely reimbursement. You are required to physically sign the reimbursement, which may take several days from the date of submission. Please plan accordingly. Failing to submit a complete reimbursement request by the appropriate date could result in denial of reimbursement. Dates are subject to change to comply with University deadlines.

 

Requesting Reimbursement

  • Submit a cover memo to the Finance Office including: 1) your name, 2) Social Security number, 3) home mailing address, 4) email address, 5) event name, dates, and location of the conference or competition you attended, 6) business purpose of the reimbursement (include conference or competition flyer or brochure), 7) name of the club or organization that awarded you funding, and 8) your signature on the memo. Requests must be submitted in hardcopy.

 

Events

  • Invited guest speakers being paid for services or expenses paid on their behalf require special guidance. Please consult with the College Finance Office prior to obligating personal or College financial resources.
  • Food purchases must comply with the University’s purchasing policy. Please coordinate with the College Finance Office prior to holding event. Catering over $500 requires catering services by the UA Student Union. All food reimbursements must be accompanied by an event brochure or invitation, list of attendees, and an itemized original receipt.

 

Travel and Airfare

  • All travel on official College business requires pre-travel authorization. This approval places students on travel status for Risk Management and emergency issues, pre-approves travel purpose, and allows money to be identified to fund the trip. Send an email including the business purpose of the trip, dates of trip, flyer/brochure or official invitation to the event, and other pertinent information to Jennifer Kruse or Bethina Krogsgaard PRIOR to the trip. Once approved by the College, the traveler will receive a travel authorization email in response. Each traveler must have a separate travel authorization. Failure to comply could result in denial of reimbursement.
  • University will reimburse for economy class airfare only. Up to one day prior to and after the event is considered reimbursable as a business expense. Outside this is considered personal and not reimbursable. You must include the purchased and business only itineraries and will be reimbursed the lesser of the two.

 

Incur Expenses Before Requesting Reimbursement

  • The College policy is that students should incur the expense prior to a reimbursement being processed. Students who incur costs for an official event but then do not attend said event are not eligible for reimbursement, except in rare and extenuating circumstances as determined by the Dean or Assistant Dean of Finance. In limited hardship cases, the Assistant Dean of Finance, or designee, will allow the student to use the College credit card to pre-purchase airfare, conference registration, and transportation costs. Students may also be eligible for a travel advance. Hotels may never be pre-purchased.

 

Rental Cars

  • Additional purchased insurance cannot be reimbursed unless the student-driver/purchaser is under 25 years of age or rental takes place in a foreign country. State Risk Management provides damage/liability coverage for students operating on official University business. Limitations apply. Report any accident or loss to the rental agency and UA Risk Management as soon as possible.
  • Vehicle reimbursement policies limit upgrade and additional feature charges. Renter accepts responsibility for denial of reimbursement if the College has not pre-approved exceptions to these policies. Assistant Dean for Finance has final approval over exceptions.
  • High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) rentals cannot be reimbursed unless the driver has successfully passed the HOV training offered by UA Risk Management.

Hotels

  • Hotels must be booked using personal credit cards. The designated conference hotel is the best option, even if it is more expensive than alternatives. Please provide conference or moot court brochure showing conference room rates. If you decide to book a room at a non-conference hotel, it must be within the lodging per diem rate for the University (rates vary by location). Lodging must be with a commercial establishment. Original receipts should include the establishment's name, address, telephone number, dates of lodging, and daily room charges. The original receipt must show a zero balance.
  • Personal expenses like movies, room service, spa and fitness center expenses, etc. cannot be reimbursed.

 

Meals

  • Students who spend the night on University travel status are eligible for reimbursement of meals based on original itemized receipt(s) up to the allowable per diem rate per meal and location. Tips must be reasonable to be eligible for reimbursement.
  • Alcohol may never be reimbursed and will be deducted from receipts.
  • Students may be required to submit an Independent Contractor (ICON) form for reimbursement.

 

The College Finance Office is located in Law Commons, Suite 201.

 

 

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Student Complaints

As an ABA-accredited law school, The University of Arizona Rogers College of Law is subject to the ABA Standards for Approval of Law schools. The Standards may be found at here. Any student at the College of Law who wishes to bring a formal complaint to the Administration of the College of Law of a significant problem that directly implicates the College’s program of legal of education and its compliance with the ABA Standards should take the following steps:

 

  1. The student complaint should be submitted in writing to the Dean, the Vice Dean, or any Associate Dean of the College.
  2. The writing should describe in detail the behavior, program, or process complained of, and demonstrate how it implicates the College’s program of legal education and the school’s compliance with a particular identified ABA Standard.

  3. The writing must provide both the name of the student submitting the complaint, the student’s official University of Arizona email address, and a street address for further communication about the complaint.

Procedures for Addressing Complaints:

  • The Dean to whom the complaint is submitted should acknowledge the complaint within three business days of receipt of the written complaint. Acknowledgment may be made by e-mail, U.S. mail, or by personal delivery.

 

  • Within two weeks of acknowledgment of the complaint, the Dean or the Dean’s designee shall either meet with the complaining student or respond to the substance of the complaint in writing. The student should either receive a substantive response to the complaint or information about what steps are being taken by the College to address the complaint or further investigate the complaint.

 

  • Appeals may be taken to the Dean of the College, or, if the Dean of the College has decided the merits of the complaint, to the Executive Committee of the College of Law.

 

  • Any decision made on appeal by the Dean or the Executive Committee shall be final.

 

  • A copy of the complaint and a summary of the process and resolution of the complaint shall be kept in the office of the Dean of the College of Law for a period of eight years.
  • This policy shall be published in the Student Handbook of the College of Law.

 

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College Email Policy

 

Official Student Email Policy: Use of Email for Official Correspondence with Students

 

1.  University use of email

Email is a mechanism for official communication within the University of Arizona.  The University has the right to expect that such communications will be received and read in a timely fashion.  Official email communications are intended only to meet the academic and administrative needs of the campus community.  As steward of this process, the Office of the Registrar is responsible for directing the use of the official student email.  See, Guidelines for the Use of Official Student Email Addresses for details.

 

2.  Assignment of student email

Official University email accounts are available for all enrolled students.  The addresses are all of the form [Name]@email.arizona.edu or [Name]@u.arizona.edu.  These accounts must be activated before the University can correspond with its students using the official email accounts.  The Account website has been designed for this purpose.  The official email address will be maintained in UAccess.  Official email address will be directory information. As with other directory information, any student may request that his or her official email address be restricted in its access.

 

3.  Redirecting of email

If a student wishes to have email redirected from their official @email.arizona.edu address to another email address (e.g., @aol.com, @hotmail.com, or an address on a departmental server), they may do so, but at their own risk.  The University will not be responsible for the handling of email by outside vendors or by departmental servers.  Having email redirected does not absolve a student from the responsibilities associated with official communication sent to his or her @email.arizona.edu account. 

 

4.  Expectations about student use of email

Students are expected to check their email on a frequent and consistent basis in order to stay current with University-related communications.  Students have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time-critical.  "I didn't check my email", error in forwarding mail, or email returned to the University with "Mailbox Full" or "User Unknown" are not acceptable excuses for missing official University communications via email.

 

5.  Authentication for confidential information

It is a violation of University policies, including the Student Code of Conduct, for any user of official email addresses to impersonate a University office, faculty/staff member, or student.  To minimize this risk, some confidential information may be made available only through UAccess Student, which is password protected.  In these cases, students will receive email correspondence directing them to UAccess Student, where they can access the confidential information only by supplying their Net ID credentials.  The confidential information will not be available in the email message.

 

6.  Privacy

Users should exercise extreme caution in using email to communicate confidential or sensitive matters, and should not assume that email is private and confidential.  It is especially important that users are careful to send messages only to the intended recipient(s).  Particular care should be taken when using the "reply" command during email correspondence.

 

7.  Educational uses of email

Faculty will determine how electronic forms of communication (e.g., email) will be used in their classes, and will specify their requirements in the course syllabus.  This "Official Student Email Policy" will ensure that all students will be able to comply with email-based course requirements specified by faculty.  Faculty can therefore make the assumption that students' official @email.arizona.edu accounts are being accessed and faculty can use email for their classes accordingly.

 

Related Links:

 

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Room Reservations

Rooms in the Law College building may be reserved for College of Law-related activities by requesting room(s) on line at here.   Your login information is the same as your login for Forums.  Information must include the name of the event, and the name, telephone number, and email address of the person requesting the reservation

Before scheduling an event which includes alumni, where the community is invited, or where the Dean is expected to speak, you must attend a mandatory Event Certification.  Please contact Marissa White at mwhite@email.arizona.edu to set up your event certification. 

 

 

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College Parking

 

The College of Law has no control over parking.  Rules and regulations that apply to all members of the University community have been adopted for the control of motor vehicles and bicycles on University property in order to promote the safety, welfare, and convenience of faculty, staff, students and visitors and to facilitate the general operation of the University.  PLEASE READ THE CURRENT EDITIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA MOTOR VEHICLE PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS AND BICYCLE RULES AND REGULATIONS.  These publications are available from University Parking and Transportation of the University of Arizona website, http://parking.arizona.edu/ .


Bicycle racks located throughout the campus are provided for the use of faculty, staff, students and visitors.  Bicycles should be locked.  U Locks, by Masterlock, are recommended by UAPD (University of Arizona Police Department), and can be purchased at cost.  UAPD is located off Campbell at 1852 E. First St.  UAPD’s telephone number is 621-8273.  Bicycles should be parked at the racks provided and nowhere else.  Bic

 

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College Signage

 

Official Notices

All official notices regarding class schedules, examinations, registration and law school regulations are posted on the College of Law web site or sent to students at their official University email accounts.  Students are expected to check this on a regular basis.  In addition, official notices are posted pursuant to the following College of Law Signage Policy.

 

Signage Policy

The purpose of this policy is to set forth guidelines for signs, posters, and written notices (“signage”) in the College of Law.  All signs, posters, and written notices in compliance with this policy shall be permitted as authorized. No other signs, posters or written notices shall be permitted and will be removed.  Posting guidelines shall be located on approved bulletin boards and in the Student Handbook.

 

Locations and Uses
    1. Official notices from the College of Law administration of activities of interest and related to the College of Law (e.g. class announcements, special events) may be posted:
      • on the tackable surface of the bulletin board in the student lounge (Lewis & Roca Student Lounge)
      • on Stanchions/Portable Display Banners with permission of the College of Law administrator responsible for the display
      • Special Events are posted on the Events Guide Telescreen located in the Jennings, Strouss & Salmon Student Lounge located near the Speedway entrance to the College of Law.
    2. Official notices from approved student groups of activities of interest and related to the College of Law (e.g. special events) may be posted:
      • on the tackable surface of the bulletin board in the Lewis & Roca Student Lounge
      • on Stanchions / Portable Display Banners with permission of the College of Law administrator responsible for the display
    3. Other announcements /personal notices may be posted:
      • on the tackable surface of the bulletin board in the vending/kitchenette area of the student lounge over the mail folders
      • to student lockers in the student locker room (Room 128)
      • Under no circumstances can signs be attached to glass, finished or painted surfaces.
    4.  

General Rules

    1. Official notices must be in the approved format, printed with a red border, and shall be no larger than 8 1/2” x11”.
    2. Signage shall contain the date on which it is to be posted and the date on which it is to be removed.  The individual or organization posting the signage is responsible for taking signage down by the day specified on the sign.
    3. Signage shall not remain posted for more than 14 days.
    4. Signage will not be permitted any place other than as described herein.  In no case shall signage be posted on any glass or wooden surface.  Prohibited locations include, but are not limited to, soundproofing on any classroom wall, rest room doors, hand rails, the floor or ground.
    5. Exceptions may be authorized by any Assistant or Associate Dean.  No posting is allowed in the library without the specific approval of Associate Dean Chiorazzi or his designee, Bonnie Schlichting.  The person authorizing the exception must initial the signage prior to posting and state the nature of the exception (e.g. oversize, alternate location, extended posting period).
    6. Signage not in conformance with the above shall be removed and discarded.
    7. Individuals or organizations found in repeated derogation of this policy may lose posting rights as determined by any Assistant or Associate Dean.  Dr. Jordan-Curtis (Student Affairs) shall have final review authority.

 

 

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University Policies

 

 

Student Life Policies

 

 

 

Academic Policies

 

 

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Updated: 08/14/2014