CourseContemporary Issues in Employment Law - Law 697K
Instructor Sherry Downer   View Faculty Page
Emailsdowner@fclaw.com
Units 2 - Graded
Prerequisites:

None

 
Recommended Courses:  
Overview

Examine and discuss legal issues connected with current employment-related topics that may impact you as an employee, employer or lawyer. This course will look at the use of social media in pre-employment decisions and when social media conduct may be used as a reason for discipline or termination without running afoul of the National Labor Relations Act.  We will also explore ethical issues relating to social media and advertising, socializing and litigation.  This course will also examine how Arizona’s Medical Marijuana law impacts employers and some of the federal-state law issues that arise for employers as a result of this law.  We will look at other contemporary laws and issues that regularly impact employment including unemployment claims and employment investigations.  Students will prepare a short paper regarding a contemporary employment issue of their choice to present in class for discussion.

 
Materials

A reading list will be distributed with the syllabus. Materials will include federal and state laws and administrative regulations related to each topic, select ethics opinions from around the country relating to social media, portions of the National Labor Relations Act, the National Labor Relations Board Report regarding social media. All materials are available on the internet or Westlaw.

 
Course Format

Lecture and discussion. Students are expected to participate in the discussion of issues

and hypotheticals during each class session.
 
Written Assignments

(1) In-class essays relating to social media (open materials, no notes); (2) prepare drug testing policy based on hypothetical; (3) persuasive letter disputing an unemployment claim; (4) prepare and present for discussion a short paper regarding a contemporary employment law issue.

 
Type of Exam

None.

 
Basis for grading

Written assignments and class participation.

 
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