Course International Environmental Law (co-meets w/696N 011) - Law 696i
Instructor James C. Hopkins
Email hopkinsj@email.arizona.edu
Coteachers:
Units 3
Prerequisites:

 None.

 
Recommended Courses:

 Public International Law is helpful for the first two weeks of this course but most of the class will not have taken it prior to enolling.

 
Overview

Options: Students may take the course/seminar as a:

2 unit course with final examination;
2 unit course with approx. 20 page term paper (no exam);
3 unit course with substantial paper (no exam) - Please sign up for LAW 696N-001

 

This course will analyze the expanding framework of and the legal process leading to regional and international regulation of the human environment. Topics addressed include the sources of international environmental law; regional and international efforts to protect the global commons; protection of endangered species; cross-border pollution and efforts to deal with such problems, with particular emphasis on the United States-Mexico border and the NAFTA instruments; climate change and global warming; conflicts between protection of the environment, economic development and sustainable development; and conflicts between trade, investment and the environment. There will also be some discussion regarding how the United States will address global environmental issues such as the continuing negotiations to replace the Kyoto Protocol. 

 
Materials

 Supplemental materials will be provided on D2L; others are available on the Internet. It is not necessary to purchase the documents supplement.

 
Course Format

 Lecture/Discussion

 
Written Assignments

 Examination or term paper.

 
Type of Exam

 Take home exam, open book, open notes.

 
Basis for grading

 Examination and class discussion; term or substantial paper (696N-001) when those options are selected. Class discussion and attendance may count for up to 20% of grade.

 
Additional Comments

 Foreign lawyers in the class typically provide a variety of viewpoints.

 
Print this Course Description