Fri Oct 31 2014   
 

The Environmental Curriculum

 

Introduction

 

The environmental law curriculum at Arizona Law is both broad and deep.  We strive to prepare lawyers to engage at all levels of environmental law and policy, from an understanding of the nature of environmental problems, to the development of law and policies to address them, to the skillful representation of clients whose future may depend upon a judge or jury’s application of that law in the courtroom, to functioning effectively as a citizen lawyer in a nation and a world in which environmental law and policy issues are critically important. 


Our courses are taught by permanent law faculty (Kirsten Engel, David Gantz, Robert Glennon, James Hopkins, Mona Hymel, Marc Miller, Carol Rose) and also by a growing number of leading environmental law specialists who teach as adjunct law faculty.  There are also numerous courses that law students may take for law school credit offered in a number of the University of Arizona’s outstanding natural and social science departments, including courses taught by faculty members whose teaching and scholarship are so closely affiliated with the law that they have been granted the status of affiliated faculty.  


The curriculum is designed both for students who are preparing for a career in environmental law or policy and for students who understand the importance of environmental law as part of a strong general legal background.


Environmental law courses are available to second and third year students.  While the first-year curriculum does not include specialized law courses in environmental law, several of the required first-year courses touch upon issues of great importance to environmental law and practice in addition to serving as a foundation to a student’s understanding of our legal system.  These courses include Property Law, Torts, Contracts, and the Introduction to the Regulatory State.


Arizona Law offers a joint degree program for students who wish to concentrate in environmental law and the study of resource economics.  This joint degree, in which students obtain a JD/MS after a three-year course of study, is offered through the Program on Economics, Law, Governance and the Environment.  Students interested in this joint-degree program should consult the following for more information


Finally, many of our courses are available to non-law graduate students at the University, provided they obtain permission from the instructor.  The addition of non-law students specializing in other fields of study, such as science, economics, political science and public policy, is welcomed by law instructors as it enhances the understanding of the inter-disciplinary aspects of environmental law and policy.

 

 

Current Course Offerings

 

Fall 2014 Environmental Courses

 

LAW 621A: Administrative Law (Engel)
Administrative law is the law relating to administrative agencies.  Because much of environmental law is made by administrative agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Department of Interior, knowledge of administrative law is vitally important for any student wishing to practice environmental law.  Administrative law encompasses constitutional law (especially separation of powers and procedural due process), federal statutory law (especially the Administrative Procedure Act), and occasionally state statutory law. 


LAW 625B: The Colorado River in American History (Glennon)
Using the work of the New West historians as a framework, this course examines the role of the Colorado River in American History.  After examining the geology of the Grand Canyon and the use made of the River and its resources by Native peoples, it examines the exploration of the Colorado River and its canyons by John Wesley Powell and other early European explorers.


LAW 696I: International Environmental Law (Hopkins)
This course involves the development and exchange of scholarly information. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.


LAW 643D: Native American Natural Resources Law (Hopkins)
This course examines several themes:  conflicts over which government has sovereign control over which resources; the role that tribal governments play in natural resource allocation and management; questions relating to ownership of natural resources; the changing federal policies relating to natural resources allocation; the role of federal courts, Congress, and Executive branches in relation to the trust responsibilities to protect tribal lands and resources; environmental protection; and natural resource development and management.


LAW 640: Public Land and Mining Law (Lacy)
This course examines the acquisition, disposal, and management of the public lands.  Particular emphasis is placed upon the mineral land laws and the laws related to mineral exploration and development of mineral resources.


ECON 696W: Environmental and Energy Economics – Empirical (Langer)
The course analyses the important and current empirical topics in environmental and energy economics.  It begins with a brief introduction to some of the most important theoretical ideas of environmental economics and then dives into recent empirical analyses of the costs and benefits of environmental and energy issues. 


GEOG/ECOL/HWRS/RNR 578: Global Change (Cole, Saleska)
This courses analyses of the Earth system through an examination of its component parts and their interactions with human activities, emphasizing information needed to understand modern and future environmental changes.  Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth written exercise and additional activities as described in the syllabus.


HWRS/RNR 581: Environmental Policy (Schlager)
The course examines the role of government in management of energy, natural resources and environment; process and policy alternatives; special attention to the Southwest.  Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and a substantial research paper of at least 25 pages in length.


RNR 585A/PA 585A: Natural Resources Economics and Planning (DeSteiguer)
This course proves an introduction to decision-making techniques for natural resources management and planning; includes modeling, economic theory, benefit-cost analysis, input-output analysis, and management science techniques.  Graduate-level requirements include an annotated bibliography of economics-related journal articles related to a topic of interest to the student. Such topics may include natural resource issues, environmental issues, public lands management, or other such issues related to the public economic sector.


PLG 660: Land Use Planning Law (Cassidy)
This course reviews the principal legal devices available to implement planning decisions on community design, the use of land, and housing needs (including urban renewal). Special attention will be paid to the significance and legal effect of a comprehensive plan and to the social and economic effects of planning decisions.

 

 

Spring 2015 Environmental Courses

 

LAW 669: Environmental Law (Engel)
This is a foundational course in environmental law and regulatory policy.  The course will focus on the concepts underlying approaches to protecting the environment, using the common law and various environmental statues primarily as examples of the different approaches to environmental protection.


LAW 641: Water Law (Glennon)
The course in Water Law traditionally emphasizes state law rules that govern rights to use surface water and groundwater throughout the country. We also will consider the role of federal law, particularly federal reserved water rights claimed by Indian tribes, and the federal government's long history of attempting to irrigate the West through its Bureau of Reclamation. 


LAW 603J: Sustainability and Environmental Policy (Miller and Rose)
Over the past twenty-five years sustainability (or sustainable development) has emerged as a central goal of environmental policy making. Sustainability has moved from the work of scholars and activists to laws and administrative regulations. The language of sustainability has extended to the world of business and commerce. This class examines the meaning, application and value of the concept of sustainability from a variety of disciplinary perspectives; primarily law, political science and ecology.


LAW 650C: Energy Law:  Focus on Renewables (Trubatch)
This course on Energy Law is a survey course with an opportunity for hands-on practice experience.  The course provides a comprehensive overview of all of the technical and economic aspects of energy, with an emphasis upon renewable power.

For more course information, please visit Arizona Law's Course Schedules.

 

 

 

Guide:  Core & Specialized Courses


The environmental law curriculum spans “core courses” and “specialized courses.”  Core courses are taught primarily by permanent law faculty and cover basic topics in environmental law.  Specialized course address a particular environmental topic for in-depth coverage.  Specialized courses are taught by permanent law faculty, leading practitioners, and outstanding scholars from across the University in areas of law, science and policy.  Specialized courses include both law courses (carrying a course number preceded by “LAW”) and courses offered in other departments (such as the Department of Geography “GEOG” or the Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics “AREC”).  Students enrolled in the JD program may take six out of the total number of credits required  for completion of their JD degree in courses offered by schools or departments other than the Law College (courses with designations other than “LAW”).     


We recommend that those students interested in concentrating in environmental law during their second and third year of law school enroll in a selection of the core courses during their second year.  This will facilitate enrollment in more advanced classes during their third year, even though most of the advanced courses have no formal prerequisites.  At the same time, students who wish to enroll in one or more environmental law courses to complete their upper level course of study should obviously feel free to take (and will be welcome in) such classes during any semester of their second or third years. 


Following the list of core and specialized courses is the listing of courses that students interested in particular topical areas – water law, property and land use, and natural resource economics – might want to consider when formulating their course of study.


Below is a comprehensive listing of environmental courses that are available to students at Arizona Law.   Not all of the classes listed are offered every year.  Students interested in taking one of the courses listed should check the Academic Program site for an up-to-date listing of environmental courses for the semester at issue.

 

 

Core Environmental Courses: At a Glance

 

Environmental Law: LAW 669

Administrative Law: LAW 621

Water Law: LAW 641

Natural Resources Law and Economics: AREC 576 / LAW 576

Mining and Public Land Law: LAW 640

International Environmental Law: LAW 696N


 

Core Environmental Courses: Descriptions

 

Environmental Law:  LAW 669
This is an introductory course in environmental law and regulatory policy.  The course will focus primarily on the domestic regulation of hazardous waste and air and water pollution and laws related to the protection of natural resources.  Our goal in studying these issues will be to gain a better understanding not only of particular environmental laws and policies, but also of the processes by which the government can regulate potentially harmful activities.  We will look not only at traditional regulatory mechanisms, but also at the opportunities for market and non-regulatory solutions.
Credits:  3

 

Natural Resources Law and Economics: AREC 576 / LAW 576 
This is a selective survey course in natural resources law and economics. 
Credits:  3


Water Law:  LAW 641
Water Law traditionally emphasizes state law rules that govern rights to use surface water and groundwater throughout the country.  Although we will give ample attention to the prior appropriation doctrine, riparian water rights, and various systems for regulating groundwater use, this course will also emphasize how federal law may impact water rights.  Increasingly, environmentalists and others claim that there are public rights to water that may take precedence over rights under the prior appropriation system.  We also will consider the role of federal law, particularly federal reserved water rights claimed by Indian tribes, and the federal government's long history of attempting to irrigate the West through its Bureau of Reclamation. 
Credits:  3


International Environmental Law:  LAW 696N
This course analyzes the expanding framework of and the legal process leading to international regulation of the human environment through “multilateral environmental agreements,” including regional and international regulation of air and water pollution and the protection of marine mammals and endangered species; the relationship between environmental and trade issues; protection of the "global commons"; conflicts between protecting the environment and economic development; enforcement of international environmental obligations by the United States and other nations; international legal aspects of climate change; and regional regulation of environmental matters, including the NAFTA and the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation.
Credits:  2 or 3

 

Administrative Law:  LAW 621
Administrative law is the law relating to administrative agencies.  Because much of environmental law is made by administrative agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Department of Interior, knowledge of administrative law is vitally important for any student wishing to practice environmental law.  Administrative law encompasses constitutional law (especially separation of powers and procedural due process), federal statutory law (especially the Administrative Procedure Act), and occasionally state statutory law.  The validity of an agency’s actions depends on compliance with administrative law. Thus, lawyers for agencies, regulated industries, and public interest groups are vitally concerned with administrative law. Much of their practice both as litigants and advisors involves administrative law. Thirteen states, including Oregon, test Administrative Law on their bar exams. This course uses a problem orientation to stress practical application of administrative law.
Credits:  3



Specialized Environmental Courses: At a Glance


The following courses are offered in the Law College or cross-listed in the Law College:

 

Natural Resource Law and Economics AREC 576 / LAW 576

Energy, the Environment and Business Strategy ECON 578 / LAW 578

Environmental Policy: PA 581 / LAW 581

Arizona Water Policy:  HWRS 596B / LAW 596B

Comparative and International Water Policy:  GEOG 596I / LAW 596I

Law, Geography and Property:  GEOG 596L / LAW 596L
Sustainability and Environmental Policy:  LAW 603J
Global Climate Change and the Law:  LAW 603M / SWES 603M
Property, Social Justice, and the Environment:  LAW 603N
American Legal History (The Colorado River):  LAW 625
Oil and Gas Law:  LAW 627

Animal Law:  LAW 630
Mining and Public Land Law:  LAW 640
Native American Natural Resources:  LAW 643D
Environmental Moot Court:  LAW 653C

Land Use Law:  PLG 660 / LAW 662B
Problems in Water Law and Policy (Substantial Paper Seminar): LAW 696N
Economics, Law, Environment and Governance Workshop: LAW 697S / AREC 697S

 

The following courses are offered in other departments, schools or colleges at the University of Arizona.  Where the course is cross-listed as a Law College course, the "LAW" listing is provided as well as the other departmental listing:

 

Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics (AREC)
Economic Evaluation of Water and Environmental Policy: AREC 575
Natural Resource Law and Economics:  AREC 576 / LAW 576

Economics, Law, Environment and Governance Workshop: LAW 697S / AREC 697S

 

Department of Economics (ECON)
Energy, the Environment and Business Strategy ECON 578 / LAW 578

 

Department of Geosciences  (GEOS)
Global Change:  GEOS 578

 

Department of Geography (GEOG)

Power, Politics and Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon:  GEOG 580

Comparative and International Water Policy: GEOG 596I / LAW 596I
Law, Geography, and Property:   GEOG 596L / LAW 596L

 

Department of Hydrology and Water Resources (HWRS)

Arizona Water Policy:  HWRS / LAW 596B

Introduction to Water Resources Policy:  HWRS 515
Water Resources Management, Planning, and Rights: A Policy Approach: HWRS 520

 

School of Government and Public Policy (POL) (formerly the School of Public Administration (PA))
Environmental Policy:  PA 581 / LAW 581

 

School of Planning (PLN)
Land Use and Growth Controls:  PLN 559

 

Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science (SWES)
Applied Environmental Law:  SWES 544

Law of Global Climate Change:  LAW 603M / SWES 603M

 

School of Natural Resources and the Environment (RNR)
Natural Resources Economics and Planning:  RNR 585
Natural Resources Policy and Law:  RNR 580

 

College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

Land Use Planning Law:  PLG 660 / LAW 662B

 

 

 

Specialized Environmental Courses: Descriptions


Courses Offered in the Law College or cross-listed as LAW courses:

 

Natural Resource Law and Economics:  AREC 576 / LAW 576
Advanced legal analysis of environmental and natural resource policies.
Credits:  3


Energy, the Environment and Business Stategy:  ECON 578 / LAW 578
Analysis of issues and ideas that cut across corporate social responsibility, sustainable business practices, energy considerations, and environmental innovation.

Credits:  3

 

Arizona Water Policy:  HWRS 596B / LAW 596B
This course focuses on current Arizona water policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Through readings, research, discussion and presentations, the student is exposed to current water resource issues facing Arizona and other parts of the West and policies to address them.   This course is offered by the University of Arizona’s Water Resources Research Center.
Credits:  3

 

Law, Geography and Property:  GEOG 596L / LAW 596L

This seminar aims to bring together law, geography, and political economy, where they overlap in matters of nature and environment.  Property rights are the central theme.  The goals of the course are to bridge the separate worlds of "law-and-society" and environmental studies, and to prepare graduate students to do interdisciplinary legal and policy analysis as part of their academic research.

Credits:  3

 

Sustainability and Environmental Policy:  LAW 603J
Over the past twenty years sustainability (or sustainable development) has emerged as a central goal of environmental policy making. Sustainability has moved from the work of scholars and activists to laws and administrative regulations. The language of sustainability has extended to the world of business and commerce. This class examines the meaning, application and value of the concept of sustainability from a variety of disciplinary perspectives; primarily law, political science and ecology. Many courses in law school and in various graduate programs might be said to touch on issues of sustainability. This course is intended to wrestle head-on with the concept and its evolving meanings and uses. The close study of one central concept will hopefully reveal general insights about environmental law, science and policy, and indeed about the interplay of law, science and policy in other areas. The study of a concept rather than the law of the concept produces a set of materials that only occasionally look like those typical to law school course (i.e., case law and statutes) and will lead us to reflect regularly on institutions other than courts and the role of lawyers as policy makers and citizens more often than advocates and counselors. This focus also makes this course especially appropriate for graduate students from a wide range of backgrounds: no prior exposure to legal materials or legal reasoning, and no detailed understanding of the operation of the modern administrative state are necessary to participate in, learn from or contribute to this course. 

Credits:  3

 

Global Climate Change and the Law:  LAW 603M / SWES 603M
Climate change is widely considered the defining environmental law and policy challenge of the 21st century and one of its most dynamic.  The development of climate change law and policy is not only moving at breakneck speed, but is occurring at multiple scales – global, national, state, local –and in multiple venues (international treaty negotiations, U.S. courts, Congress, statehouses and municipalities) simultaneously.  This class will introduce students to the legal response to global climate change, from the international response to the domestic and including the interactions and relationships between the multiple scales and institutions involved in climate change regulation.  A particular focus will be the scale at which a mitigation or adaptation response is being initiated and the impact of regulation at one scale (e.g., the domestic state level) upon regulation at another scale (e.g., the national scale).  Another focus will be upon the method of regulation chosen with a particular emphasis upon “cap and trade”, the advantages, perils and pitfalls of trading regimes and the particular challenges posed by the linking of multiple trading regimes at the domestic and global levels.
Credits:  2 or 3 

 

Property, Social Justice, and the Environment:  LAW 603N
This seminar will take up a number of hot button issues from all over the world, where property rights intersect with issues of the environment and social justice. It will start with some basics about property and the classic “tragedy of the commons,” using some examples and asking whether well-structured property rights might (or might not) contribute to overcoming environmental degradation as well as to long-term poverty. It will then move through some specific issues of property-rights approaches where environmental and social issues overlap. 
Credits:  1

 

American Legal History (The Colorado River):  LAW 625
Using the work of the New West historians as a framework, we shall examine the role of the Colorado River in American History.  After examining the geology of the Grand Canyon and the use made of the River and its resources by Native peoples, we shall examine the exploration of the Colorado River and its canyons by John Wesley Powell and other early European explorers.  The main theme of the course will be the important role that the water of the Colorado River has played in the Southwest.  The battle among competing interests to harness the waters of the River, and the fight over the legal rights to use the water, has consumed essentially the entire twentieth century.  By critically examining these fights, aided by readings from other disciplines, including environmental history, literature, economics, and ecology, the history of the Colorado River will suggest lessons about current public policy issues as well as insights into American attitudes about nature and natural resources, particularly water.
Credits:  2

 

Oil and Gas Law:  LAW 627
This course will provide interested students with an overview of oil and gas statutes, regulations, and case law, as well as an overview of typical transactions involving oil and gas, such as oil and gas leases, royalty agreements, etc. The course will focus on the legal rules that govern the development of privately owned mineral rights, which often also apply to governmentally owned resources. The course includes an overview of conservation law; rule of capture and correlative rights; how an oil and gas lease works; implied covenants; severed minerals and some of the problems related [e.g., double fractions, meaning of “minerals”]; contracts (support, farmout, operating, drilling); and pooling and unitization.
Credits:  1

 

Animal Law:  LAW 630

The course will survey the growing field of animal law.  Students will analyze laws affecting many types of animals including companion animals, farm animals, animals in laboratories, animals used for entertainment, and wildlife in the contexts of constitutional, tort, criminal, administrative and contract law.  The course will provide an overview of state and federal case law, regulations and statutes, focusing on Arizona Laws.  Students will be required to attend one court or administrative hearing involving animals.

Credits:  2

 

Mining and Public Land Law:  LAW 640
This course examines the acquisition, disposal, and management of the public lands of the United States.  Particular emphasis is placed upon the mineral land laws and the laws related to mineral exploration and development of mineral resources.
Credits:  2

 

Native American Natural Resources Law:  LAW 643D
This course will examine several themes: conflicts over which government has sovereign control over which resources; the role that tribal governments play in natural resource allocation and management; questions relating to ownership of natural resources; changing federal policies relating to natural resources allocation; the role of federal courts, Congress and Executive branches in relation to the trust responsibilities to protect tribal lands and resources; environmental protection, including EPA policy in relation to Indian Reservations; and natural resources development and management.
Credits:  3

 

Environmental Moot Court:  LAW 653C
This course may be taken only by the three 2L or 3L students selected to compete in the Pace Environmental Moot Court Competition held each spring at Pace Law School.  During years that the Law College participates in the competition, selection of the three team members occurs in the fall semester.  The course consists of the joint preparation of an appellate brief, multiple practice sessions preparing for the competition, and participation in the Environmental Moot Court competition at Pace Law School.
Credits:  2

 

Problems in Water Law and Policy (Substantial Paper Seminar):  LAW 696N

This seminar offers an opportunity to write a paper on an aspect of water law and/or policy that interests you.  It is a writing seminar that satisfies the College of Law’s “starred seminar” requirement.  Possible formats for the paper include: a law review Note and an appellate brief.  Students interested in a particular subject matter may make it the subject of an analytic essay.  Other papers may focus on a pending case.  If the case has been set for oral argument, a student might obtain the briefs and then write a judicial opinion.  For a case on which oral argument has not been set, you might prepare a brief on the merits.
Credits:  3

 

Economics, Law, Environment and Governance Workshop: LAW 697S / AREC 697S
This workshop exposes students and participating faculty members to a broad range of original research in the area of overlap between law, economics and environmental issues.  The Workshop consists of presentations of works-in-progress by visiting scholars.  Students are expected to critically analyze the scholars’ work through the completion of short writing assignments.
Credits:  1 

 

The following are courses offered by (including cross-listed courses) other departments, schools or colleges:

 

College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (CALA):

 

Land Use Planning Law:  PLG 660 / LAW 662B

Review of the principal legal devices available to implement planning decisions on community design (official map, subdivision control), the use of land (nuisance, covenants and zoning) and housing needs (including urban renewal). Special attention will be paid to the significance and legal effect of a comprehensive plan and to the social and economic effects of planning decisions.

Credits:  3

 

Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics (AREC)

 

Economic Evaluation of Water and Environmental Policy:  AREC 575
Theory and application of economic concepts needed to evaluate water and environmental laws and policies, including benefit cost analysis, externalities, public goods and valuation methodologies. Case studies include federal, state, tribal and international water and environmental policies.
Credits:  3

 

Natural Resource Law and Economics:  AREC 576 / LAW 576
Advanced legal analysis of environmental and natural resource policies.
Credits:  3

 

Department of Economics (ECON)

 

Energy, the Environment and Business Stategy:  ECON 578 / LAW 578)
Analysis of issues and ideas that cut across corporate social responsibility, sustainable business practices, energy considerations, and environmental innovation.

 

Department of Geosciences (GEOS)

 

Global Change:  GEOS 578
Analysis of the Earth system through an examination of its component parts (particularly climate and biogeochemistry) and their interactions with human activities, emphasizing information needed to understand modern and future environmental changes. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth written exercise and additional activities as described in the syllabus.

 

Department of Geography (GEOG)


Comparative and International Water Policy: GEOG 596I / LAW 596I
This course examines major issues in comparative and international water policy, including water markets, privatization, dams and river basin management, environmental flows, social equity, and water governance. The course is interdisciplinary and builds on law, geography, political economy, and institutional economics.
Credits:  3

 

Power, Politics and Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon:  GEOG 580

Despite the opposition of a large percentage of the Brazilian population and the alarm of environmentalists across the globe, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon continues. Today nearly 20 percent has been cut down and the rate of deforestation may be increasing. Why is this happening and what can be done about it? This seminar examines the wide variety of causal explanations and policy proposals offered by Latin American and North American political scientists, geographers, economists, historians, anthropologists, ecologists, journalists and environmental activists.

Credits:  3

 

Law, Geography and Property:  GEOG 596L / LAW 596L

This seminar aims to bring together law, geography, and political economy, where they overlap in matters of nature and environment.  Property rights are the central theme.  The goals of the course are to bridge the separate worlds of "law-and-society" and environmental studies, and to prepare graduate students to do interdisciplinary legal and policy analysis as part of their academic research.

Credits:  3

 

Department of Hydrology and Water Resources (HWRS)


Introduction to Water Resources Policy:  HWRS 515
Water resources policy including the identification of regional problems of water use, the elements of water planning, water rights, and a consideration of institutional structures and processes.
Credits:  3

 

Water Resources Management, Planning, and Rights: A Policy Approach: HWRS 520
An introduction to basic concepts and issues of water resources management and administration, emphasizing water law and rights, water resources planning, institutional and organizational arrangements, and policy processes such as adjudication and rule-making.
Credits:  3

 

Arizona Water Policy: HWRS 596B / LAW 596B

This course focuses on current Arizona water policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Through readings, research, discussion and presentations, the student is exposed to current water resource issues facing Arizona and other parts of the West and policies to address them.   This course is offered by the University of Arizona’s Water Resources Research Center.
Credits:  3

 

School of Government and Public Policy (POL) / (formerly the School of Public Administration (PA))

 

Environmental Policy:  PA 581 / LAW 581
Emphasis on the interactions among science, decision making, policy, and property rights in relation to natural resource dilemmas. Special attention paid to community based management. Case studies are drawn from water, forestry, fisheries, and grazing lands.
Credits:  3

 

School of Planning (PLN)

 

Land Use and Growth Controls:  PLN 559
Current planning and legal issues dealing with regulation of growth, the sequence of growth, and the limiting of growth are analyzed. Issues of equity in controlling land use are also explored.
Credits:  3

 

Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science (SWES)

 

Applied Environmental Law:  SWES 544
A guided journey through real world environmental law; U.S. legal system, major environmental laws-criminal and civil; common marketplace problems and solutions; high profile cases; essential professional skills.
Credits:  3

 

Global Climate Change and the Law:  LAW 603M / SWES 603M
Climate change is widely considered the defining environmental law and policy challenge of the 21st century and one of its most dynamic.  The development of climate change law and policy is not only moving at breakneck speed, but is occurring at multiple scales – global, national, state, local –and in multiple venues (international treaty negotiations, U.S. courts, Congress, statehouses and municipalities) simultaneously.  This class will introduce students to the legal response to global climate change, from the international response to the domestic and including the interactions and relationships between the multiple scales and institutions involved in climate change regulation.  A particular focus will be the scale at which a mitigation or adaptation response is being initiated and the impact of regulation at one scale (e.g., the domestic state level) upon regulation at another scale (e.g., the national scale).  Another focus will be upon the method of regulation chosen with a particular emphasis upon “cap and trade”, the advantages, perils and pitfalls of trading regimes and the particular challenges posed by the linking of multiple trading regimes at the domestic and global levels.
Credits:  2 or 3 

 

School of Natural Resources and the Environment (RNR)

 

Natural Resources Economics and Planning:  RNR 585
This course examines methods for planning and decision-making in the management of renewable natural resources on public lands. The course topics are: economic welfare and market failure, cost-benefit analysis, market and non-market valuation, linear programming, input-output analysis, multi-criteria decision methods, and timber harvest scheduling. The renewable natural resources considered are water, timber, wildlife, wilderness, fisheries, range and recreation.
Credits:  3

 

Natural Resources Policy and Law:  RNR 580
This course examines the natural resource and environmental policy formulation process, the participants in that process and the policies themselves. The course emphasizes public policy as it applies to federal lands. However, the principles apply to state lands and policies as well.
Credits:  3

 

 

 

Environmental Curriculum – By Topic Area


Water Law and Policy
Water Law:  LAW 641
American Legal History (The Colorado River):  LAW 625
Arizona Water Policy: HWRS 596B / LAW 596B
Problems in Water Law and Policy (Substantial Paper Seminar): LAW 696N
Comparative and International Water Policy: GEOG 596I / LAW 596I
Introduction to Water Resources Policy:  HWRS 515
Water Resources Management, Planning, and Rights: A Policy Approach: HWR 520
Economic Evaluation of Water and Environmental Policy:  AREC 575

 

Sustainability and Environmental Economics
Sustainability and Environmental Policy:  LAW 603J
Economics, Law, Environment and Governance Workshop: LAW 697S / AREC 697S
Energy, the Environment and Business Strategy: ECON 578 / LAW 578

 

Property and Land Use
Land Use Law:  PLG 660 / LAW 662b
Property, Social Justice, and the Environment:  LAW 603N
Law, Geography and Property:  GEOG 596L / LAW 596L

 

Natural Resources and Public Lands
Natural Resources Law and Economics:  AREC 576 / LAW 576
Native American Natural Resources Law:  LAW 643D
Mining and Public Land Law:  LAW 640
Natural Resources Economics and Planning:  RNR 585
Natural Resources Policy and Law:  RNR 580
Oil and Gas Law:  LAW 627

 

International Environmental Law and Climate Change
International Environmental Law:  LAW 696N
Global Climate Change and the Law:  LAW 603M / SWES 603M
Global Change:  GEOS 578