Wed Sep 17 2014   
Affilitiated Faculty
 

College News and Events

Celebration of Admission to the Practice of Law in Arizona

Alumni who passed the July 2014 Arizona Bar and guests are invited to a celebration of admission to the practice of law in Arizona on Friday, October 24, 2014, at 4:00 p.m., in the Ares Auditorium (Room 164). Thomas A. Zlaket, Justice, Arizona Supreme Court (Retired), will preside at this celebration.

While this celebration is ceremonial only and applicants will not be admitted to the practice of law in Arizona until all requirements have been completed, it will be an opportunity to congratulate new alumni who are on their way to being officially admitted.

Posted: 09/15/2014

The Mind and the Law Lecture Series Starts Wednesday, September 10

The Mind and the Law, a series of public lectures at University of Arizona sponsored by the College of Science and the James E. Rogers College of Law (Prof. Christopher Robertson) and the Cognitive Science Program in the School of Mind, Brain and Behavior (Prof. Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini), will be held on select Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m., in Ares Auditorium.

These lectures will address the remarkable development of interdisciplinary studies exploring the cognitive components, for the most part unconscious, involved in legal settings. How do eyewitnesses reconstruct their memories? How do juries make sense of brain images? How can appellate judges make decisions about prejudicial evidence, without themselves being prejudiced by the evidence? Are disclosure mandates an effective way to prevent biases in healthcare due to conflicting interests? How do emotional appeals impact jury decision making? These public lectures will offer a unique panorama of this field, drawing on leading scholars from around the country, from across Arizona, and from across four colleges here at the University of Arizona.

The schedule is as follows:

  • September 10, The (Unavoidable) Behavioral Lens within Lawmaking, David Yokum (Department of Psychology, University of Arizona. Fellow with the U.S. Social and Behavioral Sciences Team in Washington, D.C.);
  • September 17, Through the Partisan Looking Glass:  The Psychology of Political Polarization, Peter H. Ditto (Department of Psychology & Social Behavior, School of Social Ecology, University of California, Irvine);
  • October 1, And If Your Friends Jumped Off a Bridge, Would You Do It? Translating Juvenile Developmental Neuroscience into Law, Amanda Pustilnik (University of Maryland Frances King Carey School of Law; and at Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law, Biotechnology, and Bioethics, Harvard Law School);
  • October 22, The Memory Factory, Elisabeth Loftus (University of California, Irvine);
  • November 5, Blinding as a Solution to Bias, Christopher T. Robertson (James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona);
  • November 19, Our Perfect Supreme Court? "From the crooked timber of humanity no straight thing was ever made." Charles Fried (Harvard Law School; formerly Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and Solicitor General of the United States);
  • December 3, Can the Law Do Anything to Improve Patient Safety? Michael Saks (Regents' Professor of Law and Psychology, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, Arizona State University).

For more information, see this page.

Posted: 09/03/2014

Prominent Legal Scholar to Speak About Religious Freedom

University of Notre Dame Professor of Law Richard W. Garnett will discuss current and emerging legal issues involving faith, church-state relations, and the exercise of religion at a free, public lecture sponsored jointly by the Notre Dame Alumni Club of Tucson and the Rehnquist Center at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. The lecture, entitled Law, Religion, and Politics:  Understanding the Separation of Church and State, will be held Friday, September 19, 2014, 7:00 - 8:30 p.m., in Room 168. A reception will follow.

In addition to teaching law, Professor Garnett has a concurrent professorship in political science. His work focuses on constitutional law, education reform, and church-state relations. He was raised in Anchorage, Alaska, and is a graduate of Duke University and Yale Law School. Before joining Notre Dame in 1999, he was a law clerk to Chief Justice William Rehnquist and practiced law in Washington, D.C. He is the founding director of Notre Dame’s program on Church, State, and Society, and serves as a consultant to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Religious Liberty.

This program is part of the annual Hesburgh Lecture Series, sponsored by Notre Dame in cities across the country to encourage intellectual dialogue.

The Rehnquist Center was established at the James E. Rogers College of Law in 2006 and is dedicated to encouraging scholarship about, and public understanding of, the separation of powers, the balance of powers between the federal and state governments, and judicial independence. Information on the Center is available at www.rehnquistcenter.org.

Posted: 08/28/2014

Barney Frank to Deliver McCormick Lecture at UA

Former U.S. Representative Barney Frank will deliver the 36th lecture sponsored by the J. Byron McCormick Society for Law and Public Affairs on Thursday, October 16, 2014, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m., in the Ares Auditorium at the College of Law. He will be speaking on Why We Need More Government and How We Can Pay for It.

Barney Frank served as United States Representative from Massachusetts for more than three decades, starting in 1981. An outspoken and deeply respected legislator noted for his keen sense of humor, Frank has played a key role in some of the most important legislation of our country’s recent history, including the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell.”

As Chair of the House Financial Services Committee from 2007 to 2011, Frank helped craft the compromise bill to slow the tide of home mortgage foreclosures in the wake of the subprime mortgage crisis, as well as the subsequent $550 billion rescue plan, and the landmark Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act – the sweeping set of regulatory reforms named partly after Frank and signed into law in July 2010, to prevent the recurrence of the financial crisis.

He also led the passage of the Credit Cardholders’ Bill of Rights Act, a measure lauded by consumer advocates, and fought to preserve affordable rental housing, as well as to reduce military spending in favor of providing for important quality-of-life needs at home.

Frank graduated from Harvard in 1962 and went on to pursue a PhD. He left before completing the degree to take a job as chief assistant to Boston Mayor Kevin White in 1968. Frank won a seat in the Massachusetts State Legislature in 1972, and though still closeted, went on to become a national leader of the LGBT rights movement, introducing the state’s first two gay rights bills in 1973.

The J. Byron McCormick Society for Law and Public Affairs was formed to honor the memory of J. Byron McCormick, who served Arizona with distinction as president of the University of Arizona, as dean of the College of Law, and as an advisor to the Arizona Board of Regents. Members of the McCormick Society foster dialogue about the critical issues of our time through an annual public lecture. Many of these lectures can be viewed here.

The Society actively seeks members who are committed to lifelong learning through the exchange of ideas and perspectives. For membership information, contact McCormick Society President Toni Massaro at massaro@email.arizona.edu.

This event is free and open to the public. Space is limited. Priority seating is available for members of the McCormick Society, invited guests, and law students with confirmed reservations, which can be made here.

Posted: 08/21/2014

Alumnus Michael Trauscht Commits $500,000 to "Arizona Law Now" Scholarship Fund

Students at the College of Law will find their debt load a little lighter, thanks to the generosity of alumnus Michael E. Trauscht (‘73).

A longtime supporter of the law college, Trauscht has made a new gift commitment of $500,000 to be used for student scholarships.

In making the gift, Trauscht said he wanted to honor “three individuals who have been critical influences in my life, and who have been a constant source of inspiration and wise counsel.” The first is Professor Emeritus Art Andrews, who was one of Trauscht’s law school teachers. The second is Dean Emerita and Regents’ Professor Toni M. Massaro, who worked closely with Trauscht and a colleague on previous fundraising projects. Maria Baier (‘92) was honored as well, for her “steadfast friendship and professional accomplishments.”

Trauscht’s gift launches the College of Law’s participation in the University of Arizona’s “Arizona Now” campaign, a five-year effort to benefit students and programs.

Dean Miller said he was “delighted that Michael Trauscht understands the critical need to keep law school tuition affordable – and make a great public school legal education accessible to all students. We have worked very hard to reduce tuition in each of the last two years, but we need alumni support to realize our ultimate goal. We’re delighted that Mike is taking the lead.”

Posted: 08/21/2014

Environmental Breakfast Club 2014 - 2015 Schedule

The Environmental Breakfast Club, a diverse group of faculty from various departments, programs and colleges on the campus who meet monthly at Arizona Law to discuss works in progress on the environment and natural resources, has released their schedule for the coming year. All presentations will be on the first Friday of each month (except January), from 8:30 - 9:45 a.m., in the Law College Faculty Lounge (Room 237).

  • September 5, 2014 - Karl Flessa, Professor of Geosciences
    Topic:  Science and Policy of the 2014 Pulse Flow to the Colorado River Delta.
  • October 3, 2014 - Gautam Gowrisankaran, Professor of Economics
    Topic:  Information Feedback and Long-Term Electricity Conservation:  Evidence from the Tapestry Building, with Shahzeen Attari, Troy Simpson and Sabine Marx
  • November 7, 2014 - Vic Baker, Regents’ Professor of Hydrology & Water Resources
    Topic:  The 2011 Tohoku Tsunami and the Fukushima Nuclear Plant Disaster
  • December 5, 2014 - Eric Lutz, Assistant Professor, Community, Environment & Policy Division, College of Public Health
    Topic:  Comparison of Diesel and Alternative Fuel Emission Exposures in Underground Mining
  • February 6, 2015 - George Frisvold, Professor and Extension Specialist, Agricultural-Resource Economics
    Topic:  Climate Policy as Water Policy:  Co-Benefits for Water Conservation and Quality
  • March 6, 2015 - Eve Edelstein, Associate Professor, College of Architecture
    Topic:  T.B.D.
  • April 3, 2015 - Mona Hymel, Arthur W. Andrews Professor of Law
    Topic:  Using U.S. Tax Policy to Address Climate Adaptation Problems

Posted: 08/13/2014

Arizona Now Campaign Aims to Raise $1.5 Billion

The University of Arizona's largest fundraising campaign in history, Arizona Now, officially launched in April. Arizona Now aims to raise $1.5 Billion over the next several years for the UA. Arizona Law's fundraising effort is $18 million. More information about Arizona Now is available at UA News

Posted: 05/30/2014